Living in a digital world- mobile phones

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Living in a digital world- mobile phones by Mind Map: Living in a digital world- mobile  phones

1. A screen which echoes the user's typing displays text messages, contacts, and more.

2. phone functions

3. A battery, providing the power source for the phone functions. An input mechanism to allow the user to interact with the phone. These are a keypad for feature phones and touch screens for most smartphones.

4. The first commercial automated cellular network was launched in Japan by Nippon Telegraph and Telephone in 1979. This was followed in 1981 by the simultaneous launch of the Nordic Mobile Telephone (NMT) system in Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden.[6] Several other countries then followed in the early to mid-1980s.

5. Smartphone

6. In 1983, the DynaTAC 8000x was the first commercially available handheld mobile phone.

7. From 1983 to 2014, worldwide mobile phone subscriptions grew to over seven billion, penetrating 100% of the global population and reaching even the bottom of the economic pyramid.[4] In first quarter of 2016, the top smartphone manufacturers were Samsung, Apple, and Huawei (and "[s]martphone sIn 1983, the DynaTAC 8000x was the first commercially available handheld mobile phone.ales represented 78 percent of total mobile phone sales"

8. The first handheld mobile phone was demonstrated by John F. Mitchell[1][2] and Martin Cooper of Motorola in 1973, using a handset weighing c. 4.4 lbs (2 kg)

9. There are Jewish orthodox religious restrictions which, by some interpretations, standard mobile telephones overstep. To deal with this problem, some rabbinical organizations have recommended that phones with text-messaging capability not be used by children.[12] Phones with restricted features are known as kosher phones and have rabbinical approval for use in Israel and elsewhere by observant Orthodox Jews. Although these phones are intended to prevent immodesty, some vendors report good sales to adults who prefer the simplicity of the devices. Some phones are approved for use by essential workers (such as health, security, and public service workers) on the sabbath, even though the use of any electrical device is generally prohibited during this time.

10. The first handheld mobile phone was demonstrated by John F. Mitchell[1][2] and Martin Cooper of Motorola in 1973, using a handset weighing c. 2 kilograms (4.4 lbs).[3]

11. Basic mobile phone services to allow users to make calls and send text messages.

12. 2000s-era mobile phones support a variety of other services, such as text messaging, MMS, email, Internet access, short-range wireless communications (infrared, Bluetooth), business applications, video games, and digital photography. Mobile phones offering only those capabilities are known as feature phones; mobile phones which offer greatly advanced computing capabilities are referred to as smartphones.

13. Evolution of mobile phones, to an early smartphone A mobile phone is a portable telephone that can make and receive calls over a radio frequency link while the user is moving within a telephone service area.

14. In 1983, the DynaTAC 8000x was the first commercially available handheld mobile phone.

15. Feature phone

16. Main article: Feature phone Feature phone is a term typically used as a retronym to describe mobile phones which are limited in capabilities in contrast to a modern smartphone. Feature phones typically provide voice calling and text messaging functionality, in addition to basic multimedia and Internet capabilities, and other services offered by the user's wireless service provider.

17. Kosher phone

18. All GSM phones use a SIM card to allow an account to be swapped among devices. Some CDMA devices also have a similar card called an R-UIM.

19. A text message (SMS). A common data application on mobile phones is Short Message Service (SMS) text messaging. The first SMS message was sent from a computer to a mobile phone in 1992 in the UK while the first person-to-person SMS from phone to phone was sent in Finland in 1993. The first mobile news service, delivered via SMS, was launched in Finland in 2000,[citation needed] and subsequently many organizations provided "on-demand" and "instant" news services by SMS. Multimedia Messaging Service (MMS) was introduced in 2001.[citation needed]

20. SIM card Main articles: Subscriber Identity Module and Removable User Identity Module Typical mobile phone SIM card. GSM feature phones require a small microchip called a Subscriber Identity Module or SIM card, in order to function. The SIM card is approximately the size of a small postage stamp and is usually placed underneath the battery in the rear of the unit.

21. In sound, smartphones and feature phones vary little. Some audio-quality enhancing features, such as Voice over LTE and HD Voice, have appeared and are often available on newer smartphones. Sound quality can remain a problem due to the design of the phone, the quality of the cellular network and compression algorithms used in long distance calls.[14][15] Audio quality can be improved using a VoIP application over WiFi.[16] Cellphones have small speakers so that the user can use a speakerphone feature and talk to a person on the phone without holding it to their ear. The small speakers can also be used to listen to digital audio files of music or speech or watch videos with an audio component, without holding the phone close to the ear.