Explicate Problem for DScaffoldingPublic

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Explicate Problem for DScaffoldingPublic von Mind Map: Explicate Problem for DScaffoldingPublic

1. Describe Stakeholders

1.1. Add Client(s)

1.1.1. PhD students

1.1.1.1. What are their goals?

1.1.1.1.1. Learn how to perform problem analysis

1.1.1.1.2. Perform a rich problem analysis

1.1.2. PhD supervisors

1.1.2.1. What are their goals?

1.1.2.1.1. Speed up the tutoring process

1.1.2.1.2. Early detection of DSR deviations

1.2. Add Decision Maker(s)

1.2.1. UPV/EHU

1.3. Add Professional(s)

1.3.1. Oscar Diaz

1.3.2. John Venable

1.3.3. Jeremías Pérez

1.4. Add Witness(es)

2. Describe Terminology

2.1. Design Science Research

2.1.1. "Design science is the scientific study and creation of artefacts as they are developed and used by people with the goal of solving practical problems of general interest."

2.2. Artefact

2.2.1. "an object made by humans with the intention that it be used to address a practical problem."

2.3. Problem

2.3.1. "an undesirable state of affairs or, more precisely, a gap between the current state and a desirable state, as perceived by the participants in the practice."

2.4. Practice

2.4.1. "a set of human activities performed regularly and seen as meaningfully related to each other by the people participating in them."

3. Set Problem Statement

3.1. Poor problem analysis

3.1.1. Supporting Evidences?

3.1.1.1. "this initial stage of the designing process is seldom satisfactorily formulated."

3.1.1.2. "Mathias (1993) found that novice designers tend to rush towards embodiments with undue haste and they tend to ‘justify’ their designs."

3.1.1.3. "In most design projects in design schools with which the author was confronted, the "problem analysis" was poorly worked out"

4. Assess Problem as Difficulties

4.1. Ascertain Consequences

4.1.1. Comprehensibility can be compromised

4.1.1.1. ...leads to...

4.1.1.1.1. Comparability can be compromised

4.1.1.1.2. Replicability can be compromised

4.1.2. Incomplete understanding of the problem

4.1.2.1. ...leads to...

4.1.2.1.1. Incomplete solution / design alternatives not considered

4.1.3. Over-confident analysis

4.1.4. The relevance of the problem may be unclear

4.1.5. Lack of rigor

4.1.5.1. ...leads to...

4.1.5.1.1. Difficulties for communication

4.2. Ascertain Causes

4.2.1. Lack of problem-solving skills

4.2.1.1. ...follows from...

4.2.1.1.1. Lack of experience

4.2.1.1.2. Inefficient tutoring

4.2.1.1.3. Lack of proper mental-structures for problem solving

4.2.1.1.4. Lack of domain knowledge

4.2.2. Lack of assistance

4.2.2.1. ...follows from...

4.2.2.1.1. Lack of clear operationalization insights

4.2.2.1.2. Lack of appropriate tools

4.2.3. Unfocused reading

4.2.3.1. Supporting Evidences?

4.2.3.1.1. "students get distracted from the main focus of the research project for example, by reading texts unrelated to the topic."

5. Assess Problem as Solutions

5.1. Alleviate Consequences

5.1.1. No longer The relevance of the problem may be unclear

5.1.2. No longer Over-confident analysis

5.1.3. No longer Comprehensibility can be compromised

5.1.3.1. ...leads to...

5.1.3.1.1. No longer Replicability can be compromised

5.1.3.1.2. No longer Comparability can be compromised

5.1.4. No longer Incomplete understanding of the problem

5.1.4.1. ...leads to...

5.1.4.1.1. No longer Incomplete solution / design alternatives not considered

5.1.5. No longer Lack of rigor

5.1.5.1. ...leads to...

5.1.5.1.1. No longer Difficulties for communication

5.2. Lessen Causes

5.2.1. No longer Lack of problem-solving skills

5.2.1.1. ...follows from...

5.2.1.1.1. No longer Lack of experience

5.2.1.1.2. No longer Inefficient tutoring

5.2.1.1.3. No longer Lack of proper mental-structures for problem solving

5.2.1.1.4. No longer Lack of domain knowledge

5.2.2. No longer Lack of assistance

5.2.2.1. ...follows from...

5.2.2.1.1. No longer Lack of appropriate tools

5.2.2.1.2. No longer Lack of clear operationalization insights

5.2.3. No longer Unfocused reading

5.2.3.1. Who else addresses it?

5.2.3.1.1. "When reading papers, it helps me to have a writing task so that I am being an active reader instead of letting my eyes glaze over mountains of text only to forget everything I just read. So for example, when I read for background information, I will save informative sentences from each article about a specific topic in a Word document. I'll write comments along the way about new ideas I got or questions I need to explore further. Then, in the future, I’ll only need to read this document instead of re-reading all the individual papers."

6. Design Problem Template

6.1. Improve

6.1.1. Poor problem analysis

6.2. By

6.2.1. Computer based scaffolding tool based on mind mapping

6.3. Such that

6.3.1. Usability

6.3.2. Learnability

6.3.3. Comprehensibility

6.3.4. Interoperability

6.3.5. Effectiveness

6.3.6. No longer Lack of appropriate tools

6.3.7. No longer Instruction is a time consuming process

6.3.8. No longer Lack of proper mental-structures for problem solving

6.3.9. No longer Difficulties for communication

6.3.10. No longer Unfocused reading

6.4. In order to

6.4.1. PhD students achieve(s) Learn how to perform problem analysis

6.4.2. PhD supervisors achieve(s) Speed up the tutoring process

6.4.3. PhD students achieve(s) Perform a rich problem analysis

6.4.4. PhD supervisors achieve(s) Early detection of DSR deviations

7. Describe Context

7.1. Describe Practice

7.1.1. Problem Analysis in DSR

7.1.1.1. "The first activity of the method framework is Explicate Problem. The goal of this activity is to formulate the initial problem precisely, justify its importance, and investigate its underlying causes."

7.1.1.2. Subactivities

7.1.1.2.1. Define precisely

7.1.1.2.2. Position and justify

7.1.1.2.3. Find root causes

7.2. Describe Activities

7.2.1. Read bibliography

7.2.2. Look for bibliography

7.2.2.1. Define alerts

7.2.3. Gather feedback

7.3. Describe Tooling

7.3.1. Reference managers

7.3.1.1. Mendeley

7.3.1.2. Zotero

7.3.2. Mind mapping software

7.3.2.1. Freemind

7.3.2.2. Mindmup

7.3.2.3. Mindmeister

7.3.3. Bibliographic databases

7.3.4. Documentation tools

7.3.4.1. Wikis

7.3.4.2. Word processors

8. Describe Problematic Phenomena

8.1. Descriptive Questions

8.1.1. What is "Poor problem analysis" like?

8.1.2. What are its properties?

8.1.2.1. High impact

8.1.2.1.1. "The first phase in the research process which is critical to the progress and performance of the beginning researcher involves the definition, construction and articulation of the research problem itself."

8.1.3. How can it be categorized?

8.1.3.1. Methodological problem

8.1.4. How can we measure it?

8.1.4.1. Asking PhD supervisors

8.1.5. What is its purpose?

8.1.6. What are its components?

8.1.6.1. Instructional

8.1.6.2. Methodological

8.1.7. How do the components relate to one another?

8.1.7.1. The instruction received by the student impacts his methodological knowledge

8.1.8. What are all the types of "Poor problem analysis"?

8.1.8.1. Deficient problem analysis

8.1.8.2. Justification of a solution

8.1.8.3. No problem analysis at all

8.1.9. How does "Poor problem analysis" differ from similar problems?

8.1.9.1. Deficient documentation

8.1.9.1.1. A poor problem analysis impacts the progression of a project, while that's not necessarily the case with a deficient documentation

8.2. Occurrence Questions

8.2.1. How often does "Poor problem analysis" occur?

8.2.1.1. Often

8.2.2. What is an average amount of "Poor problem analysis"?

8.2.3. How does "Poor problem analysis" normally work?

8.2.3.1. The PhD student perceives a problem in a practice

8.2.3.2. (He superficially analyses the problem)

8.2.3.3. He embodies the solution

8.2.3.4. Finally, he performs a (kind of) problem analysis

8.2.4. What is the process by which "Poor problem analysis" happens?

8.2.5. In what sequence do the events of "Poor problem analysis" occur?

8.2.6. What are the steps "Poor problem analysis" goes through as it evolves?

9. Requirements

9.1. Functional Requirements

9.1.1. No longer Lack of appropriate tools

9.1.2. No longer Instruction is a time consuming process

9.1.3. No longer Lack of proper mental-structures for problem solving

9.1.4. No longer Difficulties for communication

9.1.5. No longer Unfocused reading

9.2. Non-functional Requirements

9.2.1. Structural

9.2.1.1. Coherence

9.2.1.2. Consistency

9.2.1.3. Modularity

9.2.1.4. Conciseness

9.2.2. Usage

9.2.2.1. Usability

9.2.2.2. Comprehensibility

9.2.2.3. Learnability

9.2.2.4. Customisability

9.2.2.5. Suitability

9.2.2.6. Accessibility

9.2.2.7. Elegance

9.2.2.8. Fun

9.2.2.9. Traceability

9.2.3. Management

9.2.3.1. Maintainability

9.2.3.2. Flexibility

9.2.3.3. Accountability

9.2.4. Environmental

9.2.4.1. Expresiveness

9.2.4.2. Correctness

9.2.4.3. Generality

9.2.4.4. Interoperability

9.2.4.5. Autonomy

9.2.4.6. Proximity

9.2.4.7. Completeness

9.2.4.8. Effectiveness

9.2.4.9. Efficiency

9.2.4.10. Robustness

9.2.4.11. Resilience