Engaging with Disabled Volunteers

Get Started. It's Free
or sign up with your email address
Rocket clouds
Engaging with Disabled Volunteers by Mind Map: Engaging with Disabled Volunteers

1. Contribution - high interest stakeholders

1.1. High influence

1.1.1. Sponsors

1.1.1.1. Undertake evaluations of disabled volunteering initiatives (See link: page 15)

1.1.1.2. Diversity awareness sessions for senior staff and trustees (See link: page 18)

1.1.1.3. Organisations that promote the recruitment and development of disabled volunteers (See link: page 59)

1.1.1.4. Potential for a conflict of interest if service-users are on a volunteer Board (See link: page 16)

1.1.1.4.1. Involvement of a former recipient of services on a Board, to establish some distance from day-to-day challenges (See link: page 14)

1.1.1.5. Disability organisations understand the issues and barriers faced by disabled people (See link: page 6)

1.1.1.6. Analysing barriers and identifying ways to remove them must involve disabled people (see link: page 10)

1.1.1.6.1. Involve disabled people in development of policy and decision-making (See link: page 18)

1.1.1.7. Ensure the organisation establishes a clear rationale for involving disabled volunteers (See link: page 36)

1.1.1.7.1. Establish an organisational diversity strategy, aligned with its Aims and Values (See link: page 18)

1.1.1.7.2. (Also see link: page 7)

1.1.2. Blockers

1.1.2.1. If volunteers require a great deal of continuous time and effort, it can be argued they are more like clients than volunteers (See link: page 19)

1.1.2.1.1. Development of a policy on involvement of disabled volunteers (See link: page 30)

1.1.2.1.2. Foster the concept of self-help (See link: page 9)

1.1.2.2. No finances to meet additional travel costs for disabled people who cannot use public transport (See link: page 10)

1.1.2.2.1. Also see link: page 33)

1.1.2.3. A perception that making the workplace accessible is very costly (See link: page 7)

1.1.2.3.1. Disability/equality training provision (See link: page 32)

1.1.2.4. A risk averse culture among employers[child protection & health and safety]prevents engaging young, disabled volunteers (See link: page 129)

1.1.2.4.1. (Also, see link: page 7)

1.1.2.5. Management have concerns that disable people's health could affect their volunteering (See link: page 10)

1.1.2.5.1. (Also, see link: page 7)

1.1.2.6. Assumptions made on a person's ability based on their disability (See link: page 2)

1.1.2.6.1. (Also, see link: page 7)

1.1.2.6.2. (Also, see link: pages 4-5)

1.1.2.7. Disabled people could impact negatively on organisational reliability (See link: page 33)

1.1.2.7.1. A structured programme involving disabled volunteers over a period of time (See link: page 29)

1.1.2.7.2. Planning workshop, getting people to explore how to involve disabled volunteers (See link: page 32)

1.1.2.8. Management fears over the extent of special provisions (both practical and management support) that need to be made (See link: page 34)

1.1.2.8.1. A member of staff with specific responsibility for coordinating disabled people volunteering (See link: page 8)

1.1.2.8.2. Development of a policy on involvement of disabled volunteers (See link: page 30)

1.1.2.8.3. A structured programme involving disabled volunteers over a period of time (See link: page 29)

1.1.2.8.4. Disability/equality training provision (See link: page 32)

1.1.2.8.5. Evidence from volunteer coordinators shows the extent of support for disabled volunteers is not much different from non-disabled volunteers (See link: page 9)

1.2. Low influence

1.2.1. Beneficiaries

1.2.1.1. Staff benefiting and learning from engaging with disabled volunteers (See link: page 6)

1.2.1.2. Look for opportunities to promote disabled volunteers to positions of higher responsibility (See link: page 22)

1.2.1.3. Clarity around the role of a disabled volunteer promotes them being viewed as a valuable team member (See link: page 31)

1.2.2. Helpless victims

1.2.2.1. Less favourable treatment and stereotyping due to an impairment (See link: page 33)

1.2.2.1.1. Development of a policy on involvement of disabled volunteers [to include bullying/harassment section] (See link: page 33)

1.2.2.1.2. Disability/equality training provision (See link: page 32)

1.2.2.2. People's fear of doing and saying the wrong thing (See link: page 32)

1.2.2.2.1. (Also, see link: page 5)

1.2.2.3. Obtain feedback from volunteers about their experience in the placement (See link: page 14)

1.2.2.3.1. (Also see link: page 22)

1.2.2.4. Staff feeling inadequately trained to support disabled people volunteering (See link: page 9)

1.2.2.4.1. Disability/equality training provision (See link: page 32)

1.2.2.4.2. Encouraging others to discuss their concerns/fears around involving disabled volunteers (See link: page 13)

1.2.2.5. 'Adjustments' can negatively affect others' working conditions (See link: page 5)

1.2.2.5.1. Use alternative solutions for access (See link: page 5)

2. Contribution - low interest stakeholders

2.1. High Influence

2.1.1. Positive influencers

2.1.1.1. Liasing with those with links with disabled people (See link: page 5)

2.1.1.1.1. Disability organisations (See link: pages 17-18)

2.1.1.1.2. Disability Officers within Job Centres

2.1.1.1.3. Day Centres

2.1.1.1.4. Colleges

2.1.1.1.5. Local advocacy groups

2.1.1.1.6. Learning Disability Partnership Boards

2.1.1.2. Over 80% of managers found employing disabled people had 'been easy' (See link: page 6)

2.1.1.3. Good links with other organisations to refer disabled volunteers if unable to place them (See link: page 12)

2.1.1.4. Organisations with an interest in positive impacts on physical and mental health (See link: page 3)

2.1.1.5. Senior management with responsibility for the Corporate Social Responsibility strategy (See link: page 60)

2.1.1.5.1. The development of proactive initiatives in recruiting disabled people as volunteers (See link: page 8)

2.1.1.5.2. Develop a business case for involving disabled volunteers (See link: pages 16-17)

2.1.1.6. An organisational culture that is open to new approaches, creativity and flexibility (See link: page 8)

2.1.1.7. Hubs of supported volunteer programmes (See link: page 9)

2.1.1.8. Disability organisations find it difficult to find what services welcome volunteer participation by disabled people (See link: page 62)

2.1.2. Negative influencers

2.1.2.1. Volunteering organisations 'under-matching' tasks to disabled volunteer for fear of setting them up to fail (See link: page 8)

2.1.2.1.1. Obtain feedback from volunteers about their experience in the placement (See link: page 14)

2.1.2.2. Support from the local CVS can be limited (See link: page 5)

2.1.2.3. Negative media images and stereotyping of disabled people (See link: page 32)

2.1.2.4. Disabled people predominantly volunteer for disability-related organisations, rather than within the wider VCS (See link: page 6)

2.1.2.4.1. Disability organisations encouraging their volunteers to move on as part of ongoing personal development (See link: page 8)

2.1.2.4.2. Positive examples of employment of disabled people can be found in all sectors (including public, education and private (See link: page 6)

2.1.2.4.3. Working with employers to encourage full participation of disabled people across all sectors (See Link: page 132)

2.1.2.5. Management lack awareness of what disabled people can contribute to volunteering (See link: page 10)

2.1.2.5.1. Facilitating contact with other organisations (See link: page 32)

2.1.2.6. Volunteering organisations tend to make reactive adjustments to volunteering requests, rather than take proactive steps to engage disabled volunteers (See link: page 7)

2.1.2.6.1. Undertake a disability audit (See link: page 19)

2.2. Low influence

2.2.1. Bystanders

2.2.1.1. Image. Photos of disabled people involved with volunteering tends to show then as passive beneficiaries (See link: page 3)

2.2.1.2. Volunteer recruitment via web-sites can present a number of barriers for disabled people (See link: page 7)

2.2.1.2.1. Advertise through a range of mediums to approach disabled volunteers (See link: page 38)

2.2.1.2.2. Development of accessible web-sites (See link: page 7)

2.2.1.3. A perception that organisations engage with disabled people to fulfil its PR needs (See link: page 5)

2.2.1.4. A lack of awareness and benefits that volunteering placements can offer (See link: page 5)

2.2.1.4.1. (Also see link: page 3)

2.2.1.5. A lack of awareness that training is often available (See link: page 5)

3. Commitment

3.1. Achievement

3.1.1. Some disabled people see volunteering as a potential change in lifestyle, or route to employment (See link: page 17)

3.1.1.1. (Also, see link: page 3)

3.1.2. Some disabled people wish to play an active role in society (See link: page 17)

3.1.2.1. Disabled people have an aptitude for service provision roles and befriending (See link: page 7)

3.1.2.2. involve disabled volunteers in peer mentoring (See link: page 13)

3.1.2.2.1. (Also, see link: page 4)

3.1.3. Some disabled people have a desire to support a specific organisation or cause (See link: page 17)

3.1.4. Volunteering organisations struggling to create 'meaningful' tasks/placements (See link: page 10)

3.1.4.1. Develop opportunities for volunteers to take ownership of tasks/activities (See link: page 23)

3.1.4.2. Working in a person-centred way [no 'one-size fits all'] (See link: page 4)

3.1.4.2.1. Also, see 'discussing requirements' (See link: pages 45 & 51)

3.1.4.3. Linking the placement to a course/qualification (See link: page 11)

3.1.5. Disabled volunteers given tasks below their capacities describing them as "boring and frustrating" (See link: page 8)

3.1.5.1. Flexibility within projects so volunteers can help with a wide variety of tasks (See link: page 6)

3.1.5.2. Developing cultures and systems that focus on the volunteer's ability rather than their disability (See link: page 37)

3.1.5.3. Ensure all disabled volunteers have the opportunity for continued self-development (See link: page 15)

3.2. Status/Influence

3.2.1. Disabled volunteers not having the confidence to volunteer for non-disabled organisations (See link: page 2)

3.2.1.1. (Also see link: page 5)

3.2.1.2. (Also see link: page 235)

3.2.1.2.1. Having a clear role description and offering a trial placement (See link: page 37)

3.2.2. Disabled people often feel they will not be welcome or respected (See link: page 60)

3.2.2.1. (Also see link: page 5)

3.2.2.1.1. Clarity around the role of a disabled volunteer promotes them being viewed as a valuable team member (See link: page 31)

3.2.2.1.2. Evidencing the transition of service-user to service-providers for disabled volunteers (See link: page 3)

3.3. Social/affiliation

3.3.1. Some disabled volunteers are keen to volunteer in order to socialise (See link: page 17)

3.3.1.1. (Also see link: page 3)

3.3.1.1.1. Ensure disabled volunteers are involved in any organisational social activities (See link: page 39)

3.3.1.1.2. Consider opportunities for pairs or groups of disabled people to commence volunteering (See link: page 19)

3.3.1.1.3. involve disabled volunteers in peer mentoring (See link: page 13)

3.4. Safety

3.4.1. Anxiety about trying something new (See link: page 5)

3.4.1.1. Provision of a personal supporter, or someone from within the organisation (See link: page 9)

3.4.1.2. Offer a 'taster' session following an interview (See link: page 13)

3.4.2. 90% of disabled volunteers with a learning disability report experiencing harassment (See link: page 33)

3.4.2.1. Development of a policy on involvement of disabled volunteers [to include bullying/harassment section] (See link: pages 30 & 37)

3.4.2.2. Disability/equality training provision (See link: page 32)

3.4.2.2.1. (Also see link: page 11)

3.4.3. Disabled volunteers can feel unsafe if they are not used to volunteering (See link: page 42)

3.4.3.1. Discuss openly about personal requirements, and promote a supportive culture (See link: page 37)

3.4.3.2. Provide route learning and develop travel confidence (See link: page 28)

3.5. Practicality

3.5.1. The cost of transport to and from their place of volunteering (See link: page 25)

3.5.1.1. Look for on-line or 'distance-volunteering opportunities (See link: page 26)

3.5.1.2. Set aside a budget for engaging with disabled volunteers (See link: page 21)

3.5.2. Lack of accessibility in venues (See link: page 10)

3.5.2.1. (Also see link: page 33)

3.5.2.1.1. NB venues where organisations provide a service to the public should already have accessible premises (See link: page 24)

3.5.2.1.2. Checklist for physical accessibility (See link: page 38)

3.5.2.1.3. Checklist for practical solutions (See link: page 16)

3.5.2.1.4. Look for on-line or 'distance-volunteering opportunities (See link: page 26)

3.5.3. Lack of available storage space for equipment or medication (See link: page 56)

3.5.4. Need for specialist equipment (See link: page 3)

3.5.4.1. Set aside a budget for engaging with disabled volunteers (See link: page 21)

3.5.4.2. Prioritising special IT equipment can overcome a number of barriers (See link: page 3)

3.5.4.3. Total Communication courses to review methods of effective communication (See link: page 11)

3.5.4.4. Checklist for equipment solutions (See link: page 17)

3.5.4.5. Checklist for communication solutions (See link: pages 18-27)

3.5.5. Restricted allocation of workspace that hinders use of equipment, support workers etc.(See link: page 56)

3.5.6. Lack of accessible parking bays (See link: page 56)

3.5.6.1. Checklist for practical solutions (See link: page 16)

3.5.7. Health conditions of volunteers can affect the continuity of their placements (See link: page 3)

3.5.7.1. Also, ill-health is a reason given by disabled people for non-involvement(See link: page 24)

3.5.8. Voluntary organisations with limited time and capacity to engage disabled volunteers (See link: page 3)

3.5.8.1. (Also see Link: page 10)

3.5.8.1.1. In some 'work' environments, it is relatively easy to engage disabled volunteers (See link: page 13)

4. Competence

4.1. Skills

4.1.1. Organisational

4.1.1.1. Inflexibility on working arrangements (See link: pages 10 and 56)

4.1.1.1.1. (Also see link: page 33)

4.1.1.2. To engage effectively with disabled volunteers, a volunteer managers need an advanced skill set (See link: page 12)

4.1.1.2.1. Can be supported by a disabled volunteer's coach/mentor (See link: page 10)

4.1.1.3. A gap between knowledge gained in training to engage with disabled volunteers and applying this in practice (See link: page 11)

4.1.1.3.1. Ask disabled volunteers about their communication needs (See link: page 30)

4.1.1.3.2. Use case study examples to tailor training (See link: page 13)

4.1.1.4. Volunteer management and communication resources guides

4.1.1.4.1. Recruitment, interviewing, training (See link: pages 23-27)

4.1.1.4.2. Recruitment, support and supervision (See link: pages 6-11)

4.1.1.4.3. Communication tips, advertising, support and development, boundaries and protection (See link: pages 6-11)

4.1.1.4.4. Recruiting and supporting volunteers (See link: pages 6-10)

4.1.1.4.5. Recruiting, managing and recognising volunteers (See link: pages 29-32)

4.1.1.4.6. Discussion of resources required (See link: pages 11-14)

4.1.1.5. Engaging disabled volunteers to support peers, based on life experience, rather than skills can result in them being removed due to the inability to do the task (See link: page 15)

4.1.1.5.1. Match opportunities to skills and abilities (See link: page 15)

4.1.1.6. Challenges for staff with discussing topics such as hygiene and appropriate behaviour (See link: page 14)

4.1.1.6.1. involve disabled volunteers in peer mentoring (See link: page 13)

4.1.1.6.2. Liasing with those with links with disabled people (See link: page 3)

4.1.1.7. Time limited tasks that are not conducive for those using alternative technology (See link: page 56)

4.1.1.8. Organisations inability to use alternative communicating formats (See link: page 33)

4.1.1.8.1. Some disabled people will be discouraged from applying if recruitment messages are in limited formats (See link: page 10)

4.1.1.9. Volunteering organisations tend to under-estimate true abilities of disabled volunteers and gave tasks below their capacities (See link: page 8)

4.1.1.9.1. Flexibility within projects so volunteers can help with a wide variety of tasks (See link: page 6)

4.1.1.10. Staff becoming emotionally attached to volunteers (See link: page 11)

4.1.1.10.1. Work with the volunteer to establish a code of conduct (See link: page 48)

4.1.1.10.2. Volunteer agreement that ensures volunteers and staff are clear about boundaries (See link: page 37)

4.1.1.11. Checklists for engaging volunteers with specific impairments (See link for purchasing document)

4.1.1.11.1. Volunteers with learning disabilities (pages 21-22)

4.1.1.11.2. Volunteers who are visually impaired (pages 23-25)

4.1.1.11.3. Volunteers who are deaf or hard of hearing (pages 37-38)

4.1.1.11.4. Autism & Asperger syndrome and volunteering (pages 39-40)

4.1.2. Individual

4.1.2.1. Low levels of literacy and numeracy (See link: page 235)

4.1.2.1.1. Also, creates difficulties to find out information, fill forms and undertake formal training (See link: page 60)

4.1.2.2. Demonstrating challenging behaviour and difficulties understanding unwritten workplace rules (See link: page 235)

4.1.2.2.1. Linking new volunteers to a mentor (See link: page 2)

4.2. Knowledge

4.2.1. Organisational

4.2.1.1. Organisational staff may have limited contact/experience with disabled people (See link: page 32)

4.2.1.1.1. (Also see link: page 33)

4.2.1.2. Management lack awareness of what disabled people can contribute to volunteering (See link: page 10)

4.2.1.2.1. Disability/equality training provision (See link: page 32)

4.2.1.3. Organisations can assume disabled people are not interested in volunteering with them, if they haven't done so in the past (See link: page 32)

4.2.1.4. Challenges created by the diverse causes and manifestations of disability (See link: page 61)

4.2.2. Individual

4.2.2.1. Inability to recognise their own abilities and strengths (See link: page 5)

4.2.2.2. Disabled volunteers who fail to acknowledge their limitations and sought responsibilities beyond their capabilities (See link: page 10)

4.2.2.3. A lack of awareness that training is often available (See link: page 5)

4.2.2.4. A lack of awareness and benefits that volunteering placements can offer (See link: page 5)

4.2.2.4.1. (Also see link: page 3)