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Engaging with Disabled Volunteers by Mind Map: Engaging with Disabled Volunteers
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Engaging with Disabled Volunteers

Contribution - high interest stakeholders

High influence

Sponsors, Undertake evaluations of disabled volunteering initiatives (See link: page 15), Diversity awareness sessions for senior staff and trustees (See link: page 18), Organisations that promote the recruitment and development of disabled volunteers (See link: page 59), Potential for a conflict of interest if service-users are on a volunteer Board (See link: page 16), Involvement of a former recipient of services on a Board, to establish some distance from day-to-day challenges (See link: page 14), Disability organisations understand the issues and barriers faced by disabled people (See link: page 6), Analysing barriers and identifying ways to remove them must involve disabled people (see link: page 10), Involve disabled people in development of policy and decision-making (See link: page 18), Ensure the organisation establishes a clear rationale for involving disabled volunteers (See link: page 36), Establish an organisational diversity strategy, aligned with its Aims and Values (See link: page 18), (Also see link: page 7)

Blockers, If volunteers require a great deal of continuous time and effort, it can be argued they are more like clients than volunteers (See link: page 19), Development of a policy on involvement of disabled volunteers (See link: page 30), Foster the concept of self-help (See link: page 9), No finances to meet additional travel costs for disabled people who cannot use public transport (See link: page 10), Also see link: page 33), Based upon a sound business case, set aside a budget for engaging with disabled volunteers (See link: page 21), Wheelchair accessibility can be achieved fairly cheaply ( - link: page 2), Also, 31% of adjustments cost nothing, and 50% cost little (See link: page 16), Seek accessing grants and additional funding where available (See link: page 10), A perception that making the workplace accessible is very costly (See link: page 7), Disability/equality training provision (See link: page 32), A risk averse culture among employers[child protection & health and safety]prevents engaging young, disabled volunteers (See link: page 129), (Also, see link: page 7), Development of a policy on involvement of disabled volunteers (See link: page 30), Involve disabled volunteers in carrying out risk assessment (See link: page 42), Obtaining guidance on legal issues and incorporate in employers liability and public liability insurance policies (See link: page 40), Management have concerns that disable people's health could affect their volunteering (See link: page 10), (Also, see link: page 7), Development of a policy on involvement of disabled volunteers (See link: page 30), Assumptions made on a person's ability based on their disability (See link: page 2), (Also, see link: page 7), (Also, see link: pages 4-5), Disability/equality training provision (See link: page 32), Disabled people could impact negatively on organisational reliability (See link: page 33), A structured programme involving disabled volunteers over a period of time (See link: page 29), Planning workshop, getting people to explore how to involve disabled volunteers (See link: page 32), Management fears over the extent of special provisions (both practical and management support) that need to be made (See link: page 34), A member of staff with specific responsibility for coordinating disabled people volunteering (See link: page 8), Development of a policy on involvement of disabled volunteers (See link: page 30), A structured programme involving disabled volunteers over a period of time (See link: page 29), Disability/equality training provision (See link: page 32), Evidence from volunteer coordinators shows the extent of support for disabled volunteers is not much different from non-disabled volunteers (See link: page 9)

Low influence

Beneficiaries, Staff benefiting and learning from engaging with disabled volunteers (See link: page 6), Look for opportunities to promote disabled volunteers to positions of higher responsibility (See link: page 22), Clarity around the role of a disabled volunteer promotes them being viewed as a valuable team member (See link: page 31)

Helpless victims, Less favourable treatment and stereotyping due to an impairment (See link: page 33), Development of a policy on involvement of disabled volunteers [to include bullying/harassment section] (See link: page 33), Disability/equality training provision (See link: page 32), (Also see link: page 13), People's fear of doing and saying the wrong thing (See link: page 32), (Also, see link: page 5), Disability/equality training provision (See link: page 32), (Also see link: page 11), Obtain feedback from volunteers about their experience in the placement (See link: page 14), (Also see link: page 22), Staff feeling inadequately trained to support disabled people volunteering (See link: page 9), Disability/equality training provision (See link: page 32), (Also see link: page 11), Encouraging others to discuss their concerns/fears around involving disabled volunteers (See link: page 13), 'Adjustments' can negatively affect others' working conditions (See link: page 5), Use alternative solutions for access (See link: page 5)

Contribution - low interest stakeholders

High Influence

Positive influencers, Liasing with those with links with disabled people (See link: page 5), Disability organisations (See link: pages 17-18), Disability Officers within Job Centres, Day Centres, Colleges, Local advocacy groups, Learning Disability Partnership Boards, Over 80% of managers found employing disabled people had 'been easy' (See link: page 6), Good links with other organisations to refer disabled volunteers if unable to place them (See link: page 12), Organisations with an interest in positive impacts on physical and mental health (See link: page 3), Senior management with responsibility for the Corporate Social Responsibility strategy (See link: page 60), The development of proactive initiatives in recruiting disabled people as volunteers (See link: page 8), Suggestions for 'positive action' (See link: pages 23-24), Develop a business case for involving disabled volunteers (See link: pages 16-17), Undertake evaluations of disabled volunteering initiatives (See link: page 12), Involve all stakeholders (See link 20: page 15), An organisational culture that is open to new approaches, creativity and flexibility (See link: page 8), Hubs of supported volunteer programmes (See link: page 9), Disability organisations find it difficult to find what services welcome volunteer participation by disabled people (See link: page 62)

Negative influencers, Volunteering organisations 'under-matching' tasks to disabled volunteer for fear of setting them up to fail (See link: page 8), Obtain feedback from volunteers about their experience in the placement (See link: page 14), Also see link: page 22), Support from the local CVS can be limited (See link: page 5), Negative media images and stereotyping of disabled people (See link: page 32), Disabled people predominantly volunteer for disability-related organisations, rather than within the wider VCS (See link: page 6), Disability organisations encouraging their volunteers to move on as part of ongoing personal development (See link: page 8), Positive examples of employment of disabled people can be found in all sectors (including public, education and private (See link: page 6), Working with employers to encourage full participation of disabled people across all sectors (See Link: page 132), Management lack awareness of what disabled people can contribute to volunteering (See link: page 10), Facilitating contact with other organisations (See link: page 32), Volunteering organisations tend to make reactive adjustments to volunteering requests, rather than take proactive steps to engage disabled volunteers (See link: page 7), Undertake a disability audit (See link: page 19)

Low influence

Bystanders, Image. Photos of disabled people involved with volunteering tends to show then as passive beneficiaries (See link: page 3), Volunteer recruitment via web-sites can present a number of barriers for disabled people (See link: page 7), Advertise through a range of mediums to approach disabled volunteers (See link: page 38), Development of accessible web-sites (See link: page 7), A perception that organisations engage with disabled people to fulfil its PR needs (See link: page 5), A lack of awareness and benefits that volunteering placements can offer (See link: page 5), (Also see link: page 3), Involving volunteer knowledge to develop improved engagement with potential volunteers (See link: page 4), Disability organisations encouraging the transition from service-user to volunteer (See link: page 8), A lack of awareness that training is often available (See link: page 5)

Commitment

Achievement

Some disabled people see volunteering as a potential change in lifestyle, or route to employment (See link: page 17), (Also, see link: page 3)

Some disabled people wish to play an active role in society (See link: page 17), Disabled people have an aptitude for service provision roles and befriending (See link: page 7), involve disabled volunteers in peer mentoring (See link: page 13), (Also, see link: page 4)

Some disabled people have a desire to support a specific organisation or cause (See link: page 17)

Volunteering organisations struggling to create 'meaningful' tasks/placements (See link: page 10), Develop opportunities for volunteers to take ownership of tasks/activities (See link: page 23), Working in a person-centred way [no 'one-size fits all'] (See link: page 4), Also, see 'discussing requirements' (See link: pages 45 & 51), Linking the placement to a course/qualification (See link: page 11)

Disabled volunteers given tasks below their capacities describing them as "boring and frustrating" (See link: page 8), Flexibility within projects so volunteers can help with a wide variety of tasks (See link: page 6), Developing cultures and systems that focus on the volunteer's ability rather than their disability (See link: page 37), Ensure all disabled volunteers have the opportunity for continued self-development (See link: page 15)

Status/Influence

Disabled volunteers not having the confidence to volunteer for non-disabled organisations (See link: page 2), (Also see link: page 5), (Also see link: page 235), Having a clear role description and offering a trial placement (See link: page 37)

Disabled people often feel they will not be welcome or respected (See link: page 60), (Also see link: page 5), Clarity around the role of a disabled volunteer promotes them being viewed as a valuable team member (See link: page 31), Evidencing the transition of service-user to service-providers for disabled volunteers (See link: page 3)

Social/affiliation

Some disabled volunteers are keen to volunteer in order to socialise (See link: page 17), (Also see link: page 3), Ensure disabled volunteers are involved in any organisational social activities (See link: page 39), Consider opportunities for pairs or groups of disabled people to commence volunteering (See link: page 19), involve disabled volunteers in peer mentoring (See link: page 13)

Safety

Anxiety about trying something new (See link: page 5), Provision of a personal supporter, or someone from within the organisation (See link: page 9), Offer a 'taster' session following an interview (See link: page 13)

90% of disabled volunteers with a learning disability report experiencing harassment (See link: page 33), Development of a policy on involvement of disabled volunteers [to include bullying/harassment section] (See link: pages 30 & 37), Disability/equality training provision (See link: page 32), (Also see link: page 11)

Disabled volunteers can feel unsafe if they are not used to volunteering (See link: page 42), Discuss openly about personal requirements, and promote a supportive culture (See link: page 37), Provide route learning and develop travel confidence (See link: page 28)

Practicality

The cost of transport to and from their place of volunteering (See link: page 25), Look for on-line or 'distance-volunteering opportunities (See link: page 26), Set aside a budget for engaging with disabled volunteers (See link: page 21)

Lack of accessibility in venues (See link: page 10), (Also see link: page 33), NB venues where organisations provide a service to the public should already have accessible premises (See link: page 24), Checklist for physical accessibility (See link: page 38), (Also see link: page 25), Checklist for practical solutions (See link: page 16), (Also see link: page 17), Look for on-line or 'distance-volunteering opportunities (See link: page 26)

Lack of available storage space for equipment or medication (See link: page 56)

Need for specialist equipment (See link: page 3), Set aside a budget for engaging with disabled volunteers (See link: page 21), Prioritising special IT equipment can overcome a number of barriers (See link: page 3), Total Communication courses to review methods of effective communication (See link: page 11), Checklist for equipment solutions (See link: page 17), Checklist for communication solutions (See link: pages 18-27)

Restricted allocation of workspace that hinders use of equipment, support workers etc.(See link: page 56)

Lack of accessible parking bays (See link: page 56), Checklist for practical solutions (See link: page 16)

Health conditions of volunteers can affect the continuity of their placements (See link: page 3), Also, ill-health is a reason given by disabled people for non-involvement(See link: page 24)

Voluntary organisations with limited time and capacity to engage disabled volunteers (See link: page 3), (Also see Link: page 10), In some 'work' environments, it is relatively easy to engage disabled volunteers (See link: page 13)

Competence

Skills

Organisational, Inflexibility on working arrangements (See link: pages 10 and 56), (Also see link: page 33), Offer a range of placement lengths, including fixed-term opportunities (See link: page 23), Checklist for flexible support and working arrangements (See link: page 17), To engage effectively with disabled volunteers, a volunteer managers need an advanced skill set (See link: page 12), Can be supported by a disabled volunteer's coach/mentor (See link: page 10), A gap between knowledge gained in training to engage with disabled volunteers and applying this in practice (See link: page 11), Ask disabled volunteers about their communication needs (See link: page 30), Use case study examples to tailor training (See link: page 13), Volunteer management and communication resources guides, Recruitment, interviewing, training (See link: pages 23-27), Recruitment, support and supervision (See link: pages 6-11), Communication tips, advertising, support and development, boundaries and protection (See link: pages 6-11), Recruiting and supporting volunteers (See link: pages 6-10), Recruiting, managing and recognising volunteers (See link: pages 29-32), Discussion of resources required (See link: pages 11-14), Engaging disabled volunteers to support peers, based on life experience, rather than skills can result in them being removed due to the inability to do the task (See link: page 15), Match opportunities to skills and abilities (See link: page 15), Challenges for staff with discussing topics such as hygiene and appropriate behaviour (See link: page 14), involve disabled volunteers in peer mentoring (See link: page 13), (Also, see link: page 4), Peer mentoring can be undermined where a disabled person was more judgemental to some with the same impairment than someone without it (See link: page 5), Liasing with those with links with disabled people (See link: page 3), Time limited tasks that are not conducive for those using alternative technology (See link: page 56), Organisations inability to use alternative communicating formats (See link: page 33), Some disabled people will be discouraged from applying if recruitment messages are in limited formats (See link: page 10), Use of the most common forms of accessible formats (See link: page 3), Volunteering organisations tend to under-estimate true abilities of disabled volunteers and gave tasks below their capacities (See link: page 8), Flexibility within projects so volunteers can help with a wide variety of tasks (See link: page 6), Staff becoming emotionally attached to volunteers (See link: page 11), Work with the volunteer to establish a code of conduct (See link: page 48), Volunteer agreement that ensures volunteers and staff are clear about boundaries (See link: page 37), Checklists for engaging volunteers with specific impairments (See link for purchasing document), Volunteers with learning disabilities (pages 21-22), Volunteers who are visually impaired (pages 23-25), Volunteers who are deaf or hard of hearing (pages 37-38), Autism & Asperger syndrome and volunteering (pages 39-40)

Individual, Low levels of literacy and numeracy (See link: page 235), Also, creates difficulties to find out information, fill forms and undertake formal training (See link: page 60), Demonstrating challenging behaviour and difficulties understanding unwritten workplace rules (See link: page 235), Linking new volunteers to a mentor (See link: page 2)

Knowledge

Organisational, Organisational staff may have limited contact/experience with disabled people (See link: page 32), (Also see link: page 33), Guidelines for interacting with disabled people (See link: pages 8-14), Facilitating contact with other organisations (See link: page 32), Management lack awareness of what disabled people can contribute to volunteering (See link: page 10), Disability/equality training provision (See link: page 32), Also see link: page 11), NB to be delivered by disabled people (See link: page 39), Disability awareness training providers (See link: page 69), Key areas to understand (See link: page 12), Organisations can assume disabled people are not interested in volunteering with them, if they haven't done so in the past (See link: page 32), Challenges created by the diverse causes and manifestations of disability (See link: page 61)

Individual, Inability to recognise their own abilities and strengths (See link: page 5), Disabled volunteers who fail to acknowledge their limitations and sought responsibilities beyond their capabilities (See link: page 10), A lack of awareness that training is often available (See link: page 5), A lack of awareness and benefits that volunteering placements can offer (See link: page 5), (Also see link: page 3), Advertise through a range of mediums to approach disabled volunteers (See link: page 38), Disabled people most commonly find out about volunteering via word of mouth (See link: page 7)