REAL ESTATE MARKET ANALYSIS

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REAL ESTATE MARKET ANALYSIS by Mind Map: REAL ESTATE MARKET ANALYSIS

1. RESIDENTIAL

1.1. TYPES

1.1.1. RESIDENTIAL HOUSING

1.1.1.1. DETACHED HOUSE

1.1.1.2. ATTACHED HOUSE

1.1.1.3. SEMI-DETACHED HOUSE

1.1.1.4. DUPLEX

1.1.1.5. BUNGALOW

1.1.1.6. ENGLISH COTTAGE

1.1.1.7. MANSION

1.1.1.8. MANUFACTURE HOUSE

1.1.1.9. ROW HOUSE

1.1.1.10. TOWNHOUSE

1.1.1.11. INDIVIDUAL OWNERSHIP

1.1.1.12. CON-DOMINIUM

1.1.2. COMMUNITIES

1.1.2.1. SINGLE-FAMILY SUBDIVISION

1.1.2.2. MASTER-PLANNED COMMUNITY

1.1.2.3. INFILL DEVELOPMENT

1.1.2.4. SECOND-HOME COMMUNITY

1.1.2.5. AFFORDABLE HOUSING

1.1.2.6. COLLEGE STUDENT HOUSING

1.1.2.7. MARKET-RATE RENTAL DEVELOPMENT

1.1.2.8. AGE-RESTRICTED HOUSING

1.2. EFFECT FACTORS

1.2.1. DEMOGRAPHIC

1.2.1.1. AGE GROUP

1.2.1.2. HOUSEHOLD SIZE

1.2.1.3. IMPACT OF IMMIGRATION AND ETHNIC DIVERSITY

1.3. IDENTIFYING THE MARKET AREA

1.3.1. DATA AVAILABILITY

1.3.2. POLITICAL SUBDIVISION

1.3.3. TRAVELLING TIME FROM ENPLOYMENT CENTERS

1.3.4. KEY DESTINATIONS & INFRASTRUCTURE PROJECTS

1.3.5. NATURAL AMENTY

1.3.6. SOCIOECONOMIC STATUS & COMMUNITY CHARACTER

1.4. ANALYZING MARKET AREA DEMAND

1.4.1. EMPLOYMENT

1.4.1.1. Projection of employment

1.4.1.2. PMA depend on Commuting distance of workers

1.4.1.3. Aggregate housing demand included housing demand and share of demand captured by rental apartment

1.4.2. HOUSEHOLD AND POPULATION

1.4.2.1. Household units most relevant to asses the new housing demand

1.4.2.2. Census within the period of 10 years

1.4.2.3. Secondary Data be collected from Private data vendor

1.4.2.4. Types of households living in the market area and household sizes are crucial

1.4.2.5. Same product can appeal to more than one type of household

1.4.3. MARKET SEGMENTATION

1.4.3.1. Each household need a typical housing product based on hard-to quantity considerations

1.4.3.2. Target customers’ need should overgeneralize

1.4.3.3. Techniques for learning including focus groups, interviews and surveys of current home shoppers or rental office visitors

1.4.3.4. Direct consumer research and psychographic analysis can be combined to provide a nuanced portrait of buyers or renters

1.4.4. INCOME

1.4.4.1. Sense of the region’s economic vitality is a must to grasp

1.4.4.2. Distribution of households by income range, median and average household income should analyze and compare to the metropolitan area

1.4.4.3. Wealth (assets minus liabilities) more precise measure to decide income level

1.4.4.4. Information on equity and Housing prices can be used to project wealth

1.5. EXAMINING COMPETITIVE SUPPLY

1.5.1. STUDY EXISTING COMPETITION

1.5.2. IDENTIFYING FUTURE COMPETITORS

1.5.3. CAPTURE, PENETRATION, ABSOPBTION RATE

1.5.3.1. Capture Rate = Proposed units/ Total Qualified Demand

1.5.3.2. Penetration Rate* = Approved Units/ Eligible Total Demand * For affordable project

1.5.3.3. Net Absorption = Total Supply Units – Occupied Units during a given time period

1.5.3.4. Absorption Rate (Sales Pace)= the number of units/leased placed under contract each month

1.5.3.5. MATRIX CAPTURE AND ABSORPTION RATE

1.5.4. ECONOMIC CONDITIONS

1.5.4.1. JOB GROWTH

1.5.4.2. Nonresidential building activity

1.5.4.2.1. office, hospital, warehouse and shopping center projects beginning over the year

1.5.4.3. Non-farm employment has been increasing mostly in private service-providing sector

1.5.4.4. Consumer spending is expected to moderate

1.5.4.5. diverse economies and low exposure to declines

2. RETAIL

2.1. TYPES

2.1.1. SHOPPING CENTERS

2.1.2. PEDESTRIAN-ORIENTED BUSINESS DISTRICT

2.1.3. FREESTANDING STORES

2.2. SECTORS

2.2.1. GAFO

2.2.1.1. general merchandise, apparel, furniture and other merchandise

2.2.1.1.1. Wal-Mart, Aeon Mall

2.2.2. CONVENIENCE STORES

2.2.2.1. super market, food stores, or drug stores

2.2.2.1.1. Family mart, pharmacity

2.2.3. RESTAURANT AND BAR

2.2.3.1. Full service

2.2.3.2. Limited service

2.3. WHAT STUDY

2.3.1. Shopping center developers

2.3.2. Local Government

2.3.3. Market Studies

2.3.4. Economic development

2.3.5. Real estate department at chain retailer and franchisers

2.3.6. Prospective anchor tenants

2.4. TREND IN SHOPPING AND SPENDING

3. OFFICE AND INDUSTRIAL

3.1. OFFICE

3.1.1. CLASS

3.1.1.1. :Measured by evaluating the space’s age, location, quality of finishes, building systems, amenities, lease rates, and tenant profile

3.1.2. LOCATION

3.1.2.1. Divided 3 areas

3.1.2.1.1. CBD

3.1.2.1.2. Outside CBD

3.1.2.1.3. Surban

3.1.3. SIZE, FLEXIBILITY

3.1.3.1. Office buildings generally fall into three size categories

3.1.3.1.1. Low rise

3.1.3.1.2. Mid rise

3.1.3.1.3. High rise

3.1.3.2. Flexibility

3.1.3.2.1. Floor plate size

3.1.3.2.2. Floor space flexibility

3.1.4. USE, OWNERSHIP

3.1.4.1. USE

3.1.4.1.1. Office Condominium

3.1.4.1.2. Multi-tenant Office

3.1.4.2. OWNERSHIP

3.1.4.2.1. Own

3.1.4.2.2. Lease

3.1.5. FEATURES, AMENITIES

3.1.5.1. The availability and accessibility to mass transit in urban cores and building’s architecture and the quality of finishes

3.1.5.1.1. Cost of parking

3.1.5.1.2. High capacity computer and voice mail systems

3.1.5.1.3. Security

3.1.5.1.4. Energy Saving Building

3.1.5.1.5. Conference rooms, training Space and Health Club

3.1.6. ANALYSIS DEMAND

3.1.6.1. Employment Growth

3.1.6.1.1. Evolve with technology, workplace culture and corporate employment policies

3.1.6.1.2. It is important to estimate employment status and prospects

3.1.6.2. Replacement Demand

3.1.6.2.1. Replace obsolete facilities

3.1.6.2.2. Vintage office can converted to residential or hotel use

3.1.6.3. Historic Net Absorbtion

3.1.6.3.1. It will be support to expect future demand, because it is the change in the amount of occupied office space over a period of time is a direct expression of recent demand

3.1.6.4. Submarket Demand

3.1.6.4.1. Proximity to a business’s client base or facilities

3.1.6.4.2. Availability of labor

3.1.6.4.3. Accessibility for workers

3.1.6.4.4. Proximity to employee amenities

3.1.6.4.5. Housing costs

3.1.6.4.6. Image of the submarket

3.1.6.4.7. Comparative rents

3.1.6.4.8. Real estate taxes

3.1.6.4.9. Impact fees levied

3.2. INDUSTRIAL

3.2.1. BUILDING TYPE

3.2.1.1. Manufacturing

3.2.1.1.1. The Representative Type of Industrial Property

3.2.1.2. Warehouse

3.2.1.2.1. Means facilities for the transportation, storage and unloading of cargo.

3.2.1.3. Flex space

3.2.1.3.1. Flex buildings are single storey properties and normally have multiple units.

3.2.1.4. R&D facilities

3.2.1.4.1. A destination for research, manufacturing and more

3.2.2. DESIGN, FEATURES

3.2.2.1. Physical

3.2.2.1.1. Land

3.2.2.1.2. Property

3.2.2.2. Technical

3.2.2.2.1. Loading Capability

3.2.2.2.2. Parking cars and trailers

3.2.2.2.3. Power

3.2.3. OWNERSHIP, MANAGEMENT

3.2.3.1. Factory

3.2.3.1.1. Designed and built to user specifications

3.2.3.1.2. Owned by corporations

3.2.3.2. Warehouse/Laboratories

3.2.3.2.1. Single-user/Build to suit

3.2.3.2.2. Multi-tenant

3.2.4. SPECIALIZED MARKETS

3.2.4.1. Metropolitan areas often specialize in different types of industrial space.

3.2.4.1.1. Economic zone

3.2.4.1.2. Transportation

3.2.5. ANALYSIS DEMAND

3.2.5.1. Demand Determinants

3.2.5.1.1. Change in corporate logistics and freight volumes

3.2.5.1.2. Demand Growth is also propelled by expansion in global trade

3.2.5.2. Freigh Movement

3.2.5.2.1. Analyzing domestic and international freight market

3.2.5.2.2. Relationship is derived between the change in occupied industrial space and the change in GMP

3.2.5.3. Replacement Demand

3.2.5.3.1. As with office space, converted to residential loft apartments or condominiums, or simply are no longer actively markets as industrial properties

3.2.5.4. Historic Net Absorbtion

3.2.5.4.1. Using historical average annual net absorption as the basis for future demand projections is a common approach

3.2.5.5. Government Incentives

3.2.5.5.1. Influenced by the availability of government incentives to spur industrial development

3.3. ANALYSIS SUPPLY

3.3.1. Leasing Activity Absorbtion

3.3.1.1. Leasing Activity

3.3.1.1.1. The gross amount of space for which leases are signed in a specified time period

3.3.1.2. Net Absorbtion

3.3.1.2.1. The change in occupied office or industrial space over a specified time period

3.3.1.2.2. Net Absorption indicates the real strength or weakness of a market, while leasing activity indicates movement within a market area

3.3.2. Rent trends lease terms

3.3.3. Vacancy Rates

3.3.3.1. A strong office or industrial market was characterized by a vacancy rate no higher than 5 to 7 percent

3.3.3.2. Based on such generalizations often result in flawed conclusions

3.3.3.3. It is worth the time and trouble to identify a data source that characterizes the market

3.3.4. Sublet Space

3.3.4.1. Ascertaining the amount of space available for sub leasing in a market area is an important element of the supply analysis

3.3.4.2. Sublet space, even if it is not occupied, is not technically vacant.

3.3.4.3. Space available for sublease is offered at a discount and thus is less expensive than other vacant space

3.3.5. Transaction Data

3.3.6. Future Additional Supply

3.3.6.1. The inventory of competitive supply must include planned projects that may come online and compete with the project under consideration

4. HOTELS AND RESORTS