Business Information Services Library (BiSL®) study guide mind map

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Business Information Services Library (BiSL®) study guide mind map by Mind Map: Business Information Services Library (BiSL®) study guide mind map

1. BiSL® Fundamentals

1.1. Business Information Services Library (BiSL®) is a framework in the public domain which is used by Business Information Managers (Business Analysts) to uniform user organizations.

1.1.1. Describes how a user organization can ensure that information provisioning within an organization is working properly?

1.1.2. The needs of a business process can be translated to both IT solutions and non- IT solutions?

1.1.3. How to shape the information provisioning for the long term?

1.2. BiSL® is a standard / model / process framework and library (of knowledge) for the implementation of business information management (BIM)

1.2.1. BiSL® offers guidance for the BIM domain, which deals with actively managing, maintaining and supporting the functionality of information systems.

1.2.1.1. BiSL® assumes a business point of view and describes the processes and activities related to information management that are a business responsibility

1.3. Vendor independent

1.4. Public domain library

1.5. Aims to professionalize the information demand function

1.5.1. The purpose of BiSL® is to come to a single process model, within an organization.

1.5.1.1. The uniformity and uniform terminology within BiSL® contributes to easy and clear communication with professional suppliers and other involved parties.

1.5.1.2. The goal is to minimize the cost in the management of the information provisioning and to support the end user optimal in the desired information provisioning.

1.6. Library is promoted and supported by the ASL BiSL Foundation (ABF)

1.6.1. www.aslbislfoundation.org

2. IT Management Domains

2.1. Loojen and Delen's model

2.2. Business Information Management (BIM)

2.2.1. User / organizational perspectives

2.2.2. focus

2.2.2.1. Information provisioning

2.2.3. Managerial aspects

2.2.4. System owner & business information managers

2.2.5. Business information management / contract management

2.2.6. BiSL® standard is dedicated to this domain

2.3. IT infrastructure Management (ITIM)

2.3.1. Production perspective

2.3.2. focus

2.3.2.1. Information technology (IT)

2.3.3. Technical aspects

2.3.4. Data center

2.3.5. Operation / renewal

2.3.6. Infrastructure (HW & system SW)

2.4. Application Management (AM)

2.4.1. Maintenance perspective

2.4.2. focus

2.4.2.1. Information systems & applications (applications & data)

2.4.3. Focused on IT solutions

2.4.4. Maintenance organization / application development

2.4.5. Application operation & change / development

2.5. IT management domains are “inextricably linked”

3. BiSL® Official publications

3.1. BiSL®: A Framework for Business Information Management - 2nd Edition

3.1.1. ISBN-13: 978-9087537029

3.1.2. Published: 2012

3.1.3. Pages: 200

3.1.4. http://www.amazon.com/BiSL-Framework-Business-Information-Management/dp/9087537026/ref=pd_sim_b_1?ie=UTF8&refRID=14ZNW1Z0261QZ4NR4QHD

3.1.5. The most important, key position on BiSL® preparing for Foundation exam.

3.2. BiSL® Pocket Guide - 2nd Edition

3.2.1. ISBN-13: 978-9087537111

3.2.2. Published: 2012

3.2.3. Pages: 160

3.2.4. http://www.amazon.com/BISL-Pocket-Guide-Practice-Publishing/dp/9087537115

3.3. BiSL® Self-assessment - Diagnosis for Business Information Management

3.3.1. ISBN-13: 978-9087537395

3.3.2. Published: 2014

3.3.3. Pages: 42

3.3.4. http://www.amazon.com/BiSL-Self-assessment-Diagnosis-Information-Management/dp/9087537395

4. BiSL® Clusters (7)

4.1. Clusters characteristics

4.1.1. BiSL® framework consists of various processes grouped together in 7 clusters.

4.1.2. Clusters communicate to each other through processes.

4.1.3. Each cluster resides in exactly one layer.

4.1.4. Each cluster resides in exactly one perspective.

4.1.4.1. Exception is Management Processes cluster which resides in two perspectives.

4.2. Operational Level

4.2.1. Use Management cluster

4.2.1.1. The Use Management cluster includes the processes that ensure optimal and continue use and support of (existing) information provisioning within an organization.

4.2.1.2. cluster goals

4.2.1.2.1. Ensure continuous, efficient and optimal support for daily use of information provision.

4.2.1.2.2. Provide optimum, ongoing support for the relevant business processes.

4.2.1.2.3. Focus on providing support to users for the use of the information provisioning.

4.2.1.2.4. Cluster is the most critical of all clusters.

4.2.1.2.5. Day-to-day management to ensure continuity of support for the business.

4.2.1.3. key question

4.2.1.3.1. Is the operational information provisioning being used and managed properly?

4.2.1.4. recommended metrics

4.2.1.4.1. Calls

4.2.1.4.2. User interaction

4.2.1.4.3. Operational data

4.2.2. Connecting Processes - Operational Level cluster

4.2.2.1. Connecting Processes - Operational Level cluster ensure that Use Management cluster and Functionality Management cluster cannot be separated from each other.

4.2.2.2. cluster goals

4.2.2.2.1. Ensure synchronizing and communication between Use Management cluster and Functionality Management cluster.

4.2.2.2.2. Decision-making, which changes are to be carried out (content, planning, clustering in releases / projects).

4.2.2.2.3. Deployment change (implementing) for use by end users.

4.2.2.3. key question

4.2.2.3.1. Why and how should we modify the information provisioning?

4.2.2.4. recommended metrics

4.2.2.4.1. Change requests

4.2.2.4.2. Transition plans

4.2.3. Functionality Management cluster

4.2.3.1. The Functionality Management cluster describes the processes by which changes in information are designed and implemented.

4.2.3.2. cluster goals

4.2.3.2.1. Automated information provision.

4.2.3.2.2. Non-automated information provision.

4.2.3.2.3. Changes / enhancements in the information provisioning

4.2.3.2.4. Keep the information provisioning fit for the business (short term business IT alignment)

4.2.3.3. key question

4.2.3.3.1. What will the modified information provisioning look like?

4.2.3.4. recommended metrics

4.2.3.4.1. Specifications and final alignment with the end user

4.2.3.4.2. Functionality requirements

4.2.3.4.3. Degree of alignment

4.2.3.4.4. Number of adjustments to the inventoried specifications

4.2.3.4.5. Lead time for determining specifications

4.2.3.4.6. Scheduling

4.3. Managing Level

4.3.1. Management Processes cluster

4.3.1.1. Management Processes cluster ensure that the clusters from the operational level are integrally controlled. For example, controlling the management activities, maintenance and renewal processes.

4.3.1.2. cluster goals

4.3.1.2.1. Ensure that Operational Process clusters are managed integrally and monitor costs and benefits, demands, contract and service levels and planning.

4.3.1.2.2. Content and functionality of information provisioning for the business process.

4.3.1.2.3. Rime and capacity needed to support daily use and for realizing changes.

4.3.1.2.4. Service agreements and IT providers.

4.3.1.2.5. Costs of BIM and IT services; and benefits of information systems.

4.3.1.2.6. In general all BiSL® processes have to be manager:

4.3.1.3. key question

4.3.1.3.1. How do we manage the information provisioning?

4.4. Strategic Level

4.4.1. I-Organization Strategy cluster

4.4.1.1. I-Organization Strategy cluster ensures that matters such as management and decision-making regarding to information provisioning are clear for all concerned parties. It also takes into account important aspects of an organization, like the structure of an organization and the environment in which the organization operates.

4.4.1.2. cluster goals

4.4.1.2.1. Set up the operation and management of the organization’s information provisioning to ensure optimal control and decision-making.

4.4.1.2.2. Control (governance) and decision-making, typically in complex situations where there are several autonomous business units alongside a centralized unit.

4.4.1.2.3. How do we exchange information with our value chain partners and how do we cooperate with them.

4.4.1.2.4. 4 types of organization / function are involved:

4.4.1.3. key question

4.4.1.3.1. How will the management of the information provisioning be structured?

4.4.1.4. recommended metrics

4.4.1.4.1. Rates

4.4.1.4.2. Quality of the services provided

4.4.1.4.3. Communications

4.4.1.4.4. Number of complaints or escalations

4.4.1.4.5. Costs

4.4.1.4.6. Knowledge and level of experience

4.4.1.4.7. Capacity to adapt

4.4.1.4.8. Number of chain partners

4.4.2. Connecting Processes - Strategic Level cluster

4.4.2.1. Connecting Processes - Strategic Level cluster assists with the achievement of an alignment and controls the interrelationship between the various plans for the information provisioning best practices by the various entities involved in the information provisioning.

4.4.2.2. All sorts of plans are drawn up at various levels within Business Information Management and the business structure, which directly or indirectly affect the information provision, for example, portfolio-related plans at the corporate level, the various plans of system owners for the future of their information systems, plans for structuring the information provisioning and also plans for structuring business processes.

4.4.2.3. All of the relevant entities have different, divergent interests, which need to be aligned with each other to ensure the effective information provisioning.

4.4.2.4. cluster goals

4.4.2.4.1. Monitor and supervise the connection between all the various plans for information provision:

4.4.2.4.2. Alignment of both strategic areas.

4.4.2.4.3. NOT TO control or make decisions.

4.4.2.5. key question

4.4.2.5.1. How can we act together?

4.4.2.6. recommended metrics

4.4.2.6.1. Policy plans

4.4.3. Information Strategy cluster

4.4.3.1. Information Strategy cluster focuses on the future of the information provisioning within an organization. This process forces a regularly review to determine to what extent the current information provisioning meets business processes. It is of importance that the connection between the information provisioning and the business process is guaranteed.

4.4.3.2. cluster goals

4.4.3.2.1. Ensure long-term alignment of the information provision with the business processes.

4.4.3.3. key question

4.4.3.3.1. What will the information provisioning look like in the medium and long term?

4.4.3.4. recommended metrics

4.4.3.4.1. Frequency of the determination of developments

4.4.3.4.2. Scope and type of developments

4.4.3.4.3. Capacity to adapt

4.4.3.4.4. Impact

4.4.3.4.5. Costs and Benefits

5. BiSL® Roles

5.1. Budget Holder

5.2. Business Information Administration Organization

5.3. Business Information Manager

5.4. Business Manager

5.5. CIO

5.6. Customer

5.7. Demand Organization

5.8. Information Manager

5.9. IT Provider

5.10. IT Supplier

5.11. IT Support

5.12. Key Users

5.13. Product Manager

5.14. Service Team

5.15. Super User

5.16. System Owner

5.17. User

5.18. User Organization

6. BiSL® Levels (3)

6.1. BiSL® has 3 (horizontal) levels.

6.2. Operational Level

6.2.1. The more or less daily, primary tasks of application management and business information management.

6.2.2. The operational processes are in practice often performed by the Business Information Managers (Business Analysts).

6.2.3. The implementation or operational processes involve the day-to-day use of the information provisioning, and determining and effecting changes to the latter.

6.2.3.1. The processes at this level focus on the everyday use of the information provisioning and shaping desired changes to the information provisioning.

6.2.4. Time dimension

6.2.4.1. today

6.2.5. Actvity

6.2.5.1. Continuously

6.2.6. Has

6.2.6.1. 3 Clusters

6.2.6.2. 9 Processes

6.3. Managing Level

6.3.1. The control of the operational processes, the strategic processes, and the management processes themselves

6.3.2. The management processes involve income, expenditure, planning, the quality of the information provisioning and making arrangements with IT suppliers.

6.3.3. The management processes within the framework BiSL® are more concerned with revenue, cost and quality of information provisioning within an organization and management of arrangements with IT the suppliers.

6.3.4. Dividing "line" between policies and operations.

6.3.5. Time dimension

6.3.5.1. short-term (month, quarter, year)

6.3.6. Actvity

6.3.6.1. Continuously

6.3.7. Has

6.3.7.1. 1 Cluster

6.3.7.2. 4 Processes

6.4. Strategic Level

6.4.1. Designing the future of the applications and the application management organization (ASL®) or the future of the business information management organization or the information provisioning (BiSL®)

6.4.2. As part of the processes at the strategic level one determines the nature of the information provisioning in the long-term and how its management should be structured.

6.4.3. At the strategic level within the BiSL® framework the long term vision for the information provisioning is defined and also is determined how the control of the information provisioning is implemented according to the BiSL® framework.

6.4.4. Time dimension

6.4.4.1. long-term (next 2-5 years)

6.4.5. Actvity

6.4.5.1. Periodic / On-demand

6.4.6. Has

6.4.6.1. 3 Clusters

6.4.6.2. 10 Processes

7. BiSL® Processes (23)

7.1. Processes characteristics

7.1.1. Processes are inside clusters.

7.1.2. Each process is inside exactly one cluster.

7.1.3. Processes communicate to each other (within and outside the cluster)

7.1.4. Each process has it's goals, activities, inputs, outputs and relationships with other processes

7.2. Operational Level

7.2.1. Use Management cluster (has 3 processes)

7.2.1.1. End User Support process

7.2.1.1.1. process description

7.2.1.1.2. process goals

7.2.1.1.3. activities

7.2.1.2. Business Data Management process

7.2.1.2.1. process description

7.2.1.2.2. process goals

7.2.1.2.3. activities

7.2.1.3. Operational Supplier Management process

7.2.1.3.1. process description

7.2.1.3.2. process goals

7.2.1.3.3. activities

7.2.2. Connecting Processes Operational Level cluster (has 2 processes)

7.2.2.1. Change Management process

7.2.2.1.1. process description

7.2.2.1.2. process goals

7.2.2.1.3. activities

7.2.2.2. Transition Management process

7.2.2.2.1. process description

7.2.2.2.2. process goals

7.2.2.2.3. activities

7.2.3. Functionality Management cluster (has 4 processes)

7.2.3.1. Specify Information Requirements process

7.2.3.1.1. process description

7.2.3.1.2. process goals

7.2.3.1.3. activities

7.2.3.2. Design non-Automated Information Systems process

7.2.3.2.1. process description

7.2.3.2.2. process goals

7.2.3.2.3. activities

7.2.3.3. Prepare Transitions process

7.2.3.3.1. process description

7.2.3.3.2. process goals

7.2.3.3.3. activities

7.2.3.4. Review and Testing process

7.2.3.4.1. process description

7.2.3.4.2. process goals

7.2.3.4.3. activities

7.3. Managing Level

7.3.1. Management Processes cluster (has 4 processes)

7.3.1.1. Planning and Resource Management process

7.3.1.1.1. process description

7.3.1.1.2. process goals

7.3.1.1.3. activities

7.3.1.1.4. recommended metrics

7.3.1.2. Financial Management process

7.3.1.2.1. process description

7.3.1.2.2. process goals

7.3.1.2.3. activities

7.3.1.2.4. recommended metrics

7.3.1.3. Demand Management process

7.3.1.3.1. process description

7.3.1.3.2. process goals

7.3.1.3.3. activities

7.3.1.3.4. recommended metrics

7.3.1.4. Contract Management process

7.3.1.4.1. process description

7.3.1.4.2. process goals

7.3.1.4.3. activities

7.3.1.4.4. recommended metrics

7.4. Strategic Level

7.4.1. I-Organization Strategy cluster (has 4 processes)

7.4.1.1. Strategic Supplier Management process

7.4.1.1.1. process description

7.4.1.1.2. process goals

7.4.1.1.3. activities

7.4.1.2. Strategic User Relationship Management process

7.4.1.2.1. process description

7.4.1.2.2. process goals

7.4.1.2.3. activities

7.4.1.3. Strategic Information Partner Management process

7.4.1.3.1. process description

7.4.1.3.2. process goals

7.4.1.3.3. activities

7.4.1.4. Define I-Organization Strategy process

7.4.1.4.1. process description

7.4.1.4.2. process goals

7.4.1.4.3. activities

7.4.2. Connecting Processes Strategic Level cluster (has 1 process)

7.4.2.1. Information Coordination process

7.4.2.1.1. process description

7.4.2.1.2. process goals

7.4.2.1.3. activities

7.4.3. Information Strategy cluster (has 5 processes)

7.4.3.1. Establish Information Chain Developments process

7.4.3.1.1. process description

7.4.3.1.2. process goals

7.4.3.1.3. activities

7.4.3.2. Establish Business Process Developments process

7.4.3.2.1. process description

7.4.3.2.2. process goals

7.4.3.2.3. activities

7.4.3.3. Establish Technological Developments process

7.4.3.3.1. process description

7.4.3.3.2. process goals

7.4.3.3.3. activities

7.4.3.4. Information Lifecycle Management process

7.4.3.4.1. process description

7.4.3.4.2. process goals

7.4.3.4.3. activities

7.4.3.5. Information Portfolio Management process

7.4.3.5.1. process description

7.4.3.5.2. process goals

7.4.3.5.3. activities

8. BiSL® - A public domain standard (not methodology), process framework, model and library (of knowledge) from Netherlands. BiSL® is dedicated to information management, information provisioning and Information demand management (both from demand and end-user side NOT from IT or IT supplier side). BiSL is closely connected to ASL®2 standard and AXELOS® ITIL® best practices and is seen as a complementary extension.

8.1. BiSL® v1 version was published in 02.2005 as public domain standard.

8.2. Revised v1 was published in 2012.

8.3. see ASL®2 mind map

8.4. see ITIL® mind map

9. BiSL® Official resources

9.1. BiSL® sample exams, available online

9.1.1. BiSL® Foundation

9.1.1.1. http://online.apmg-exams.com/index.aspx?subid=83&masterid=18

9.1.1.2. https://www.exin.com/assets/exin/exams/2021/requirements/preparation_guide_bimf_english_201207.pdf

9.2. BiSL® glossary

9.2.1. http://aslbislfoundation.org/en/category/nieuws/vertaallijsten-bisl/

9.3. BiSL® website

9.3.1. http://www.aslbislfoundation.org/en/bisl

9.4. BiSL® White Papers

9.4.1. An introduction to BiSL®

9.4.2. TOGAF® 9 & BiSL® - Two perspectives on Business Information Management (BIM)

9.4.3. ITIL® and BiSL®: sound guidance for business-IT alignment from a business perspective

9.4.4. COBIT® 5 & BiSL®

9.4.5. BiSL® made measurable

9.4.6. ISO/IEC 38500 – BiSL – ASL. A comparison

10. BiSL® standard consists of: 3 Levels, 2 Perspectives, 1 Model, 7 Clusters, 23 Processes, 1 Framework and 1 Maturity Model.

10.1. Business Information Services Library (BiSL®) logo

10.2. Business Information Services Library (BiSL®) is mainteined and developed by ASL BiSL Foundation from Netherlands

10.2.1. http://www.aslbislfoundation.org/

11. BiSL® Maturity Model

11.1. 6 Levels of maturity

11.1.1. Level 0 - Absent

11.1.2. Level 1 - Initial

11.1.2.1. The organization does not have a stable environment in which Business Information Management processes are executed. There are however some attempts and sometimes activities are executed in order to acquire insight and knowledge. The results and the outcomes of the activities are usually unpredictable.

11.1.3. Level 2 - Repeatable

11.1.3.1. The organization executes activities repetitively. Previous experience and ways of working are used for the execution of activities. Signs of a standard way of working are appearing.

11.1.4. Level 3 - Defined and managed

11.1.4.1. The activities and processes are defined and documented. The processes have been well thought through. The processes have also been designed and implemented to provide quantitative and qualitative indicators that the organization can use for control and adjustment.

11.1.5. Level 4 - Optimizing

11.1.5.1. The organization is characterized by continual process improvement. Mechanisms and processes have been developed to enable ongoing and controlled improvements to the process.

11.1.6. Level 5 - Chain

11.1.6.1. The focus of the organization during the design and implementation, the improvement, and the mutual adjustment of processes all focus on increasing the added value within the process chain in which they participate.

12. BiSL® Exams

12.1. Using this mind map and official BiSL®2 Glossary you can by yourself prepare and pass in first try BiSL® Foundation exam.

12.1.1. Foundation exam as name suggests is a basic level, introduction certification. Exam is based only on theory and requires no experience in Business Information Management and Information Provisioning.

12.1.2. Practitioner exam is under development.

12.2. Preparing for an BiSL® Foundation exam is also possible through self-study (completing an accredited training is not required prerequisite for certification). Registration for the so called public exam is through the website of APMG-International.

12.2.1. http://www.apmg-international.com/en/exams/public-exams.aspx

12.3. BiSL® sample exams, available online

12.3.1. BiSL® Foundation

12.3.1.1. http://online.apmg-exams.com/index.aspx?subid=83&masterid=18

12.4. BiSL® glossary

12.4.1. http://www.aslbislfoundation.org/en/asl/best-practices/doc_download/907-2014-02-bisl-list-of-definitions-v10

13. BiSL® can be seen as a layered framework with 3 separate layers.

13.1. Download print-ready BiSL® A3 poster, variant 1 (PDF)

13.2. Download print-ready BiSL® A3 poster, varian #2 (PDF)

14. Interactive BiSL® Glossary

14.1. Interactive BiSL® Glossary

15. This freeware, non-commercial interactive mind map (aligned with the newest version of BiSL®) was carefully hand crafted with passion and love for learning and constant improvement as well for promotion the standard and framework BiSL® and as a learning tool for candidates wanting to gain BiSL® qualification. (please share, like and give feedback - your feedback and comments are my main motivation for further elaboration. THX!)

15.1. Questions / issues / errors? What do you think about my work? Your comments are highly appreciated. Feel free to visit my website: www.miroslawdabrowski.com

15.1.1. http://www.miroslawdabrowski.com

15.1.2. http://www.linkedin.com/in/miroslawdabrowski

15.1.3. https://www.google.com/+MiroslawDabrowski

15.1.4. https://play.spotify.com/user/miroslawdabrowski/

15.1.5. https://twitter.com/mirodabrowski

15.1.6. miroslaw_dabrowski

16. BiSL® Perspectives (2)

16.1. Use and Structure

16.1.1. Focus on the use and structure of information provision

16.2. Content

16.2.1. Focus lies on content of information provision

16.2.2. What must information provision look like