Plate Tectonic Movement via Google Earth

Get Started. It's Free
or sign up with your email address
Rocket clouds
Plate Tectonic Movement via Google Earth by Mind Map: Plate Tectonic Movement via Google Earth

1. Chapter 9

1.1. Cognitive Load

1.1.1. The cognitive load is being used in the various types of Tectonic Plate boundaries in the Google Earth software using the actual examples for each boundary.

1.2. Intrinsic Load

1.2.1. The intrinsic load for this lesson is the interactivity of the Google Earth software

1.3. Extrinsic Load

1.3.1. The extrinsic load for this lesson is the ruler tool in the Google Earth software

1.4. Goal-Free Effect

1.4.1. The ruler tool will allow the learners to have a goal-free effect

1.5. Worked-Example Effect

1.5.1. Examples of the various Tectonic Plate boundaries before the students need to go find real examples of them via Google Earth.

1.6. Split-Attention Effect

1.6.1. Showing the students how to use the ruler tool in the Google Earth software

1.7. Redundancy

1.7.1. Presentation of the various types of Tectonic Plate boundaries from verbal explanation and visual display meets this principle.

2. Chapter 16

2.1. Project Management

2.1.1. Scope

2.1.1.1. Adopting the ideas and skills learned in this lesson can be useful for students in their future living situations in regards to Tectonic Plate boundaries.

2.2. Legal Considerations

2.2.1. This Instructionally Designed lesson does not violate any legal agreements, and will not result in any lawsuits against any parties.

3. Chapter 15

3.1. Planned Change

3.1.1. The Planned Change for this lesson isn't applicable.

3.2. Diffusion

3.2.1. Encouraging students to buy into the lesson by reminding them about their grades and how important this lesson was for their grades.

3.3. Adoption

3.3.1. Adopting the ideas and skills learned in this lesson can be useful for students in their future living situations in regards to Tectonic Plate boundaries.

3.4. Innovation

3.4.1. Using the skills and knowledge learned in the lesson to develop more knowledge about Tectonic Plate boundaries and their movement behavior.

3.5. CLER Model

3.5.1. Configuration

3.5.1.1. Configuring the lesson comes from the end of the designer, or educator that is developing the content.

3.5.2. Linkages

3.5.2.1. The linkage relationship is the instructor, me, and the learners, my students.

3.5.3. Environment

3.5.3.1. The environment for this specific Instructionally Designed lesson is one of the computer labs inside of the high school where the students are enrolled and I am employed.

3.5.4. Resources

3.5.4.1. The main resource for this specific Instructionally Designed lesson is the Google Earth software.

3.5.4.2. The Google Earth software is considered a Conceptual Resource.

4. Chapter 11

4.1. Formative Evaluation

4.1.1. The instrument will be used for formative assessment to start off with. The main purpose I would use the formative assessment for is to check for understanding.

4.2. Summative Evaluation

4.2.1. Upon more practice and depth into the unit at hand, summative assessment will be implemented for an end of unit examination.

4.3. Confirmative Evaluation

4.3.1. How well the students do on their summative assessments as well as their state tests regarding this information

4.4. Validity

4.4.1. Formative assessment will be conducted and compared to scientific data with Tectonic Plate movement

4.5. Reliability

4.5.1. Can be found when the results of the students' predictions are evaluated.

4.6. Relative Standards

4.6.1. There are no relative standards for this specific lesson.

4.7. Absolute Standards

4.7.1. The absolute standard for this lesson is to see if they were close or not to the scientific data or not.

5. Chapter 14

5.1. Learning Theory

5.1.1. The students will learn from visuals and interactive technologies.

5.2. Behavioral Learning Theory

5.2.1. This can be involved from constant monitoring of students, checking for understanding, use of humor, and positive reinforcement.

5.3. Social Learning Theory

5.3.1. Inappropriate use of the computers during the lesson will result in loss of privileges and points for the day.

5.4. Instructional Theory

5.4.1. I will present information in 3 different ways to the students to ensure learning is taking place.

5.5. Instructional Design Model

5.5.1. I will be presenting information verbally, visually, as well as through an interactive technology.

6. Instructional Context

6.1. Lighting

6.1.1. The lighting in the room that the instruction will take place in can be controlled on either end of the room with a switch. The functions of the switch are either, 'ON' or 'OFF.' There are also windows in the room with adjustable blinds. These two options of having control over the lighting in the room will allow the learners to see what is being projected from my computer to the front of the room, as well as the visibility of their keyboards, mice, or potential guided instructions.

6.2. Noise

6.2.1. There is one hallway that the room of instruction is near. Cancelling out the noise from that hallway can be controlled by closing each door. If the noise persists and builds upon itself, headphones are available to each and every participant in the lesson.

6.3. Temperature

6.3.1. The room where the instruction is taking place has a thermostat to control the temperature. There are also multiple windows in the room that can be used in controlling the temperature to a comfortable level for the learners.

6.4. Seating

6.4.1. Each student has their own table and adjustable chair to ensure comfort and space when participating in this lesson.

6.5. Accomodations

6.5.1. The space where the learning is taking place is available to each and every student after the instruction is over, before/after school, as well as during study hall/lunch.

6.6. Equipment

6.6.1. None of the equipment being used is available for rent. But the Google Earth software is available to anyone that has an Internet connection.

6.7. Transportation

6.7.1. For this specific lesson, the learners are junior level high school students. There are busses, as well as transportation provided by themselves to get to the learning site.

7. Attitudes

7.1. Relevant to State Mandated Standards

7.2. Applies to future living situations

7.3. Learning how the Earth is constantly changing

8. Interpersonal Skills

8.1. Awareness of others being involved in the same instruction

8.1.1. Understanding that everyone learns at a different pace

8.1.2. Potential collaboration could take place to get everyone brought up to speed

8.1.2.1. To prevent anyone from falling behind during the instruction

9. Procedures

9.1. Understanding of material, broad to lesson specific

9.1.1. Geology is the study of the Earth’s materials, and its characteristics

9.1.1.1. The Earth is constantly moving, even though it isn’t noticeable

9.1.1.1.1. Change of the Earth happens over a long time period

9.1.1.1.2. Different ‘Tectonic Plates’ cover the Earth, similar to a cracked eggshell

9.1.1.1.3. The boundaries in between different Tectonic Plates have distinct behavior, and are grouped from that behavior

10. Concepts

10.1. Geology

10.1.1. Earth is divided into slabs of crust (Plates)

10.1.1.1. Continental Drift

10.1.1.1.1. Plate Tectonics

11. Principles

11.1. Viscosity of the internal components of the Earth

11.1.1. Viscous molten rock movement in the Mantle

11.1.1.1. Upper portion of Mantle- Asthenosphere

11.1.1.1.1. Acts as ‘slider’ for the Lithosphere to move

11.1.1.2. Lower portion of Earth’s crust- Lithosphere

11.1.1.2.1. Moves on top of Asthenosphere, depending on the direction of the molten rock movement

12. Facts

12.1. Nature of Science

12.1.1. Empirical Evidence

12.1.1.1. Alfred Wegener

12.1.1.1.1. ‘Puzzle-like’ fit of continents

12.1.1.1.2. Animal remnants, fossils

12.1.1.1.3. Electromagnetism of Basaltic ocean floor

13. Chapter 1

13.1. Instructional Designer

13.1.1. Nick Calabrese

13.2. SME

13.2.1. For this instructionally designed lesson, I am the SME

13.3. Evaluator

13.3.1. Nick Calabrese

13.4. Instructional Problem

13.4.1. The instructional problem for this particular lesson is that students struggle to see how Plate Tectonics work, without visualization. Google Earth allows the students to get a look at how the Earth has transformed and will continue to transform.

13.5. ADDIE

13.5.1. Analysis

13.5.2. Design

13.5.3. Development

13.5.4. Implementation

13.5.5. Evaluation

13.6. Learners

13.6.1. I will be providing instruction to my 11th grade Environmental Science students. The characteristics that can influence instruction is their prior experience with Google Earth, familiarity with a computer and their visual learning preference.

13.7. Methods

13.7.1. The said lesson design was based on ‘Dynamic Learning Environments,’ coined in Rethinking Methodology in the Learning Sciences (Barab & Kirschner, 2001). As stated by Barab and Kirschner, DLEs are environments that constantly evolving the way knowing occurs through changing environments, keeping a dynamic flow (p. 8). I believe that having an engaging, virtual, fast traveling tour to actual locations where the various plate tectonic activity is occurring, is fitting and meets the requirement of a DLE. Developing a lesson to meet a DLE requirement allows the teacher and students a like, an opportunity to break up monotony in the classroom.

13.8. Objectives

13.8.1. Knowledge

13.8.1.1. Students will verbally list all of the types of Tectonic Plate boundaries after I introduce them with 100% accuracy.

13.8.2. Comprehension

13.8.2.1. Students will locate which tool on Google Earth can measure distance after I verbally describe the tool with 100% accuracy.

13.8.3. Application

13.8.3.1. Students will practice selecting and using the correct tool on Google Earth to measure distance of certain sides of the Tectonic Plate boundaries with 100% accuracy.

13.8.4. Analysis

13.8.4.1. Students will calculate the distance of the diverging sea floor from the Mid-Ocean ridge using the distance tool inside of Google Earth with 75% accuracy.

13.8.5. Synthesis

13.8.5.1. From their knowledge of Tectonic Plate movement, students will formulate and display their idea of where the continents were 10 million years ago with 50% accuracy.

13.9. Evaluation

13.9.1. From their knowledge of Tectonic Plate movement, students will predict and display an idea of where the continents will be in 10 million years with 50% accuracy.

14. Chapter 2

14.1. Needs Assessment

14.1.1. Performance Assessment

14.1.2. Goal Analysis

14.1.2.1. I would like the target audience to recognize the various types of Tectonic Plate boundaries that the Earth contains via Google Earth.

14.1.2.2. I would like the target audience to recognize those different Tectonic Plate boundaries invthe specific areas of the planet where they can be found.

14.1.2.3. I would like the target audience to understand the maneuverability of Google Earth, and create their own, unique, fast traveling tour of the different Tectonic Plate boundaries.

14.1.2.4. I would like the target audience to engage in additional experience with computers, building on their digital literacy.

14.1.3. Critical Incident Needs

14.1.3.1. A critical incident need relevant to this instructionally designed lesson would be the failure of the Internet connection, and/or faulty computer systems. In the case of either of those scenarios happening, a guided, step-by-step paper version of the examples of the Tectonic Plate boundaries with images included to reinforce geospatial understanding as well as location.

14.1.4. Anticipated Needs

14.1.4.1. For this instructionally designed lesson, the anticipated or future needs would be to implement instruction into the lesson for customization of fast travel tours that visit the Tectonic Plate boundaries and have overlaid imagery in those places to increase academic content, concentration and retention.

14.1.5. Expressed Needs

14.1.5.1. For this instructionally designed lesson, some of the expressed needs within the target audience might be the need to want to design their own fast travel tours with the examples they have of Tectonic Plate movements across the world. Creating an experience to get the target audience to go above and beyond the lesson is an expressed need I would like to give them an opportunity to have.

14.1.6. Felt Needs

14.1.6.1. For this instructionally designed lesson, my students have already had some experience with Google Earth, and can at least maneuver at a novice level. The felt needs that this lesson addresses is the want to utilize the skills they already have and build upon them in regards to speed, setting up guided, fast traveled tours, accuracy, and overall literacy of the software. Creating the interactivity between the software and user will help build off of their experience with Google Earth. Jackson, Brummel, Pollet, & Greer (2013) took normal tabletops and replaced with an interactive tabletops to see if they could help students in regards to interactive technologies for learning. The interactive tabletops transformed the regular classrooms into Computer Supported Collaborative Learning environments. The CSCL environments offered students a type of learning that broke free from the status quo of learning, by taking away from the teacher instructing to the teacher moderating and mediating around the classroom as the students are immersed in an interactive media.

14.1.7. Comparative Needs

14.1.7.1. The comparative need doesn't have any relevance to this specific instructionally designed lesson. Since there is only one 11th grade Environmental Science class, there is no comparing to another set of learners, leaving the target audience to that one class.

14.1.8. Normative Needs

14.1.8.1. The normative needs for this lesson are that of meeting the state standard for this specific content is outlined in the Ohio Department of Education's Standards regarding plate motion. The causes and evidence of plate motion, measuring plate motion, characteristics of oceanic and continental plates, and relationship of plate movement and geologic events and features, are all standards that need to be met, and can be met from this instructionally designed lesson. Since there are no national standards in science education, the normative standards for the state of Ohio are the goals for this target audience to learn and retention.

15. Chapter 3

15.1. Learner Analysis

15.1.1. Frederick Kumih

15.1.1.1. Motivations

15.1.1.1.1. He is participating in this training because he is enrolled in the Environmental Science course at the high school where he attends, and I teach. The priorities that he has is to follow along with the instruction as accurately and carefully as possible. He needs this instruction because he needs to learn about the various Tectonic Plate boundaries that the planet Earth has to offer.

15.1.1.2. Limitations

15.1.1.2.1. The potential factors that could impede this learner's productivity is the failure of the Internet connection and/or faulty computer systems. He comes from a low SES household, and does not have the same software at home. Frederick transferred into my class halfway through the year, after we had used Google Earth for previous lessons. Since he hasn't used this software before, I will need to make sure the instruction is very clear, delivered in small, manageable pieces, and at an understandable pace. Frederick is from Ghana, and speaks and understands the English language at a novice level, reinforcing the importance of the delivery and design of this said instruction.

15.1.1.3. Learning Style

15.1.1.3.1. Frederick has told me that he is a visual learner, and enjoys working with computers. Luckily, this will aid in his learning since he enjoys this learning style. Having an equal balance of computer based instruction and step-by-step instruction from me won't seem to be anything that will hinder his learning for this lesson.

15.1.1.4. Ideal Experience

15.1.1.4.1. The ideal experience that Frederick would prefer is discovery learning within the Google Earth software. Since this lesson requires certain places with certain Tectonic Plate boundaries, he wouldn't take away the main goals for this lesson. If he were to engage in discovery learning from Google Earth, he would be able to increase his maneuverability skills within the software.

15.1.2. Ricky Valentino

15.1.2.1. Motivations

15.1.2.1.1. He is participating in this training because he is enrolled in the Environmental Science course at the high school where he attends, and I teach. The priorities that he has is to follow along with the instruction as accurately and carefully as possible. He needs this instruction because he needs to learn about the various Tectonic Plate boundaries that the planet Earth has to offer.

15.1.2.2. Limitations

15.1.2.2.1. The potential factors that could impede this learner's productivity is an IEP for auditory understanding. To aid this learner during instruction, I will give him a typed out, guided, step-by-step instructional aid to help him follow along with the lesson being given. Having this step-by-step instructional guide will allow him to stay on track with the lesson, at his own pace. Ricky is familiar with Google Earth in regards to maneuverability, but not with the Tectonic Plate boundary content. Ricky comes from a high SES household and has the software at his home, allowing him to spend more time, if needed, at home with the lesson. Ricky is from Athens, Ohio, and is literate with the English language.

15.1.2.3. Learning Style

15.1.2.3.1. Ricky is a visual learner and loves using technology in the classroom as well as at home. He enjoys the interactivity that technology has to offer, especially in school, where he struggles in his classes that aren't utilizing interactive technologies. Working alone is something that he prefers, due to his independent nature. Allowing him to fall back to the guided instruction given to him will allow him to work along with his independent nature, and have an additional resource if needed.

15.1.2.4. Ideal Experience

15.1.2.4.1. His main priority for this lesson is to learn the content being taught through this software. He is very adamant about passing his Ohio Graduation Tests as soon as possible, and is starting to take school very seriously, as he wants to pursue a future in graphic design.

15.2. Contextual Analysis

15.2.1. Orienting Context

15.2.1.1. The goals that the target learning audience has for taking the instructional lesson is that they can earn a score for their Environmental Science class that can increase their overall grade, as well as practicing their computer skills and manipulation of software that involves geospatial understanding.

15.2.1.2. I believe that the learners in the target audience will view this as a useful experience for two reasons. The first reason that I believe they will find this experience useful is for the practice using not only this specific software, but engaging in an experience that gets them on a computer, practicing their typing skills, as well as geospatial understanding. The other reason that I believe they will find this learning experience useful is because all of the students in the target love working with different technologies and are always open to new lessons involving technology.

15.3. Transfer Context

15.3.1. The learners' perceptions of accountability vary within this learning experience. For majority of the target audience, they want to succeed to the fullest extent for this assignment. Succeeding to the fullest extent for this assignment is advancing in their understanding of the software, but also in accuracy regarding the assignment that goes alongside this learning experience. The consequences of not meeting mine, or their own standards is the lose of not taking this experience seriously, missing out on fun, interactive software where they can analyze the Earth's crust and their surroundings as well as a poor grade for the aligned assignment after this instructional experience.

15.3.2. This learning experience is valuable for the target audience in regards to real-world context because they are getting a hands on learning experience on the computer. Majority of the kids that I teach have no technologies at home such as computers, cell phones, etc., and the more experience that they get with these items, the more technologically literate they become. Its important for them to get the most experience with these technologies, specifically computers, as soon as possible to give them a prior experience for the future when it comes to higher education and career paths. A specific real world application of this lesson is for anyone in the target audience who decides to move to various spots around the world. For example, if anyone in the target audience moves to Japan, they will have the knowledge of frequent, dangerous, earthquakes and tsunamis. The earthquakes and tsunamis are triggered from the Tectonic Plate movement, and causes much destruction and turmoil to the inhabitants of Japan. Having knowledge about the different Tectonic Plate boundaries gives the learner a heads up in regards to possible life threatening situations and circumstances. Another real world application of this lesson is the practice on a computer. Google Earth isn't going to be used in every profession around the world, but computers are starting to be implemented into every career path. Gaining the digital literacy from this instructionally designed lesson is the underlying theme that I want the target audience to leave with. The Google Earth software is free and available to anyone with an Internet connection, so students have the opportunity to revisit the content learned in this lesson, or to explore different parts of the software that we didn't cover in this lesson. Online forums are another resource for the learner in the target audience to have outside of this specific learning experience. A forum is a digital meeting place where people can interact, learn, debate and gain new knowledge from other people's experiences and beliefs (Arulchelvan 2011). When forums are being used, the participants are able to share their information, experiences, as well as their technological knowledge.

16. Chapter 4

16.1. Task Analysis

16.1.1. Content Structures

16.1.2. Topic Analysis

16.1.3. Procedural Analysis

16.1.3.1. My rational for the flowchart I have provided is to have the concepts for this instructionally designed lesson laid out in an organized manner, gradually breaking down the ideas for the lesson to help the learner in the target audience understand the hierarchy of the information being taught during the lesson time period. For visual learners, having the information displayed in a way that doesn't confuse the learner, and breaks the information down into small, manageable pieces. Seeing the information in this diagram shows the transition from broad and general to specific and detailed.

17. Chapter 5

17.1. Instructional Objectives

17.1.1. Bloom’s Taxonomy

17.1.1.1. Affective Domain

17.1.1.1.1. For this instructionally designed lesson, I am choosing to use Bloom's Taxonomy. I am choosing to use Bloom's Taxonomy because according to Ursani, Memon, & Chowdy, structuring instruction aligned with Bloom's Taxonomy serves a purpose in formative assessment (2014). Ranging from knowledge to evaluation, creating unique, different, and challenging questions for assessment is more dynamic than one type of question.

17.1.1.2. Psychomotor Domain

17.1.1.2.1. Imitation

17.1.1.2.2. Manipulation

17.1.1.2.3. Precision

17.1.1.2.4. Articulation

17.1.1.3. Cognitive Domain

17.1.1.3.1. Creating

17.1.1.3.2. Evaluating

17.1.1.3.3. Analyzing

17.1.1.3.4. Applying

17.1.1.3.5. Understanding

17.1.1.3.6. Remembering

18. Chapter 7

18.1. Generative Strategies

18.1.1. The generative strategy for this objective is to have depictions alongside each type of Tectonic Plate boundaries.

18.2. Recall

18.2.1. Ask the students, "Does anyone know why the Earth is constantly moving?"

18.2.1.1. If not, explain the various types of Tectonic Plate movement.

18.3. Integration

18.3.1. Upon more practice and depth into the unit at hand, summative assessment will be integrated for an end of unit examination.

18.4. Organizational

18.4.1. Pictures of the various Tectonic Plate boundaries will be present during explanation

18.5. Elaboration

18.5.1. I will elaborate on each type of Tectonic Plate boundary after they are introduced.

19. Chapter 8

19.1. Preinstructional Strategies

19.1.1. The Preinstructional Strategy being used is an 'Overview'