COMS101 - Mind map examples

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1. Required branches

1.1. Selected topic

1.1.1. Once you know your topic, please write it here

1.2. Main research question

1.2.1. Once you decide your research question, please write it here

1.3. Focused research questions

1.3.1. Please write here

1.4. Search terms

1.4.1. List all appropriate search terms

1.4.1.1. One term per node

1.4.2. List most successful search queries

1.4.2.1. One query per node

1.4.2.1.1. URL of the query itself

1.5. Final sources of information

1.5.1. Title of article, book, or source (one node per source)

1.5.1.1. Primary or secondary

1.5.1.2. Popular or scholarly

1.5.1.3. Authority

1.5.1.4. Currency

1.5.1.5. Content

1.6. Article analyses

1.6.1. Template for Analyzing the Logic of an Article (One per chosen article)

1.6.1.1. Main purpose

1.6.1.1.1. Type here

1.6.1.2. Key question/issues that the author is addressing

1.6.1.2.1. Type here

1.6.1.3. Most important information in the article

1.6.1.3.1. Type here

1.6.1.4. Main inferences/conclusions in article

1.6.1.4.1. Type here

1.6.1.5. The key concept(s) we need to understand in this article is (are)

1.6.1.5.1. The concept of ________

1.6.1.6. Main assumption(s) underlying the author's thinking is (are)

1.6.1.6.1. Type here

1.6.1.7. Implications

1.6.1.7.1. If we take this line of reasoning seriously

1.6.1.7.2. If we fail to take this line of reasoning seriously

1.6.1.8. Main point(s) of view presented in this article is (are)

1.6.1.8.1. Type here

1.7. Organization mind map for your paper

1.7.1. Free flow mind mapping

1.7.1.1. Up to you

1.7.2. If you followed the Template for Analyzing the Logic of an Article, this part will be easier

1.8. Your final paper

1.8.1. Link to your final paper in Google Docs

2. Examples

2.1. Required branches (Student 1)

2.1.1. Selected topic

2.1.1.1. Internet and Higher Education

2.1.2. Main research question

2.1.2.1. How do internet and technology change higher education teaching and is it effective?

2.1.3. Focused research questions

2.1.3.1. In higher education, what are the positive and negative effects of students using their mobile devices?

2.1.4. Search terms

2.1.4.1. List all appropriate search terms

2.1.4.1.1. Internet Use

2.1.4.1.2. Education

2.1.4.1.3. Higher education

2.1.4.1.4. Technology

2.1.4.1.5. teaching

2.1.4.1.6. Learning

2.1.4.2. List most successful search queries

2.1.4.2.1. Internet and Higher Ed

2.1.5. Final sources of information

2.1.5.1. The Internet in face-to-face higher education: Can interactive learning improve academic achievement? British Journal of Educational Technology

2.1.5.1.1. Primary

2.1.5.1.2. Scholarly

2.1.5.1.3. Castaño-Muñoz, Jonatan; Duart, Josep M.; Sancho-Vinuesa, Teresa

2.1.5.1.4. Very current, published in 2014

2.1.5.1.5. Contains research that proves the success of interactive learning classrooms

2.1.5.2. Non-academic internet use in the classroom is negatively related to classroom learning regardless of intellectual ability. COMPUTERS AND EDUCATION

2.1.5.2.1. Primary

2.1.5.2.2. Scholarly

2.1.5.2.3. Authority

2.1.5.2.4. 2014

2.1.5.2.5. A qualitative study on how students actual use technology in the classroom

2.1.5.3. MOBILE LEARNING IN HIGHER EDUCATION: AN EMPIRICAL ASSESSMENT OF A NEW EDUCATIONAL TOOL The Turkish Online Journal of Educational Technology

2.1.5.3.1. Primary

2.1.5.3.2. Scholarly

2.1.5.3.3. Douglas MCCONATHA, Matt PRAUL, West Chester University of Pennsylvania, Michael J. LYNCH, Temple University

2.1.5.3.4. Not as current as other sources, 2008

2.1.5.3.5. Analyzes the effectiveness of mobile learning tools as a support system for traditional class learning

2.1.5.4. Online learning helps prepare pupils for university. Educational Journal

2.1.5.4.1. Primary

2.1.5.4.2. Scholarly

2.1.5.4.3. Martin Oliver is professor of education and technology at the London Knowledge Lab, a research centre of the Institute of Education, University of London. He has been president of the Association for Learning Technology and has edited several journals in this area. His work focuses on how technology influences academic and professional practice.

2.1.5.4.4. Very, 2014

2.1.5.4.5. Shows proven successes of online learning, highlighting its effects on developing student independence, technological literacy, and confidence.

2.1.5.5. Higher Education and Emerging Technologies: Shifting Trends in Student Usage The Journal of Academic Librarianship

2.1.5.5.1. Primary

2.1.5.5.2. Scholarly

2.1.5.5.3. Cassidy, Erin Dorris; Colmenares, Angela; Jones, Glenda; Manolovitz, Tyler; Shen, Lisa; Vieira, Scott. All faculty at SHSU

2.1.5.5.4. 2014

2.1.5.5.5. Discusses how students use technology for education

2.1.5.6. When Students Can't Go Online THE ATLANTIC

2.1.5.6.1. Primary

2.1.5.6.2. Popular

2.1.5.6.3. Terrance F. Ross works primarily for The Atlantic

2.1.5.6.4. 2015

2.1.5.6.5. Discuss how students with lack of internet can fall behind.

2.1.5.7. Digital study may push some to web addiction TIMES HIGHER EDUCATION

2.1.5.7.1. Primary

2.1.5.7.2. Popular

2.1.5.7.3. Chris Havergal, has BA and MA and large work base on higher education

2.1.5.7.4. 2015

2.1.5.7.5. Discusses how internet use can be a distraction and prevent students from succeeding.

2.1.5.8. There's An App For That DIVERSE: ISSUES IN HIGHER EDUCATION

2.1.5.8.1. Primary

2.1.5.8.2. Popular

2.1.5.8.3. Autumn Arnett, hard to find information on her. She is the Editor and Chief for HBCU Digest

2.1.5.8.4. 2012

2.1.5.8.5. Discusses the positives and negatives for using mobile devices and internet technology in higher education, paying attention to older students and faculty concerns

2.1.6. Article analyses

2.1.6.1. The Internet in face-to-face higher education: Can interactive learning improve academic achievement? British Journal of Educational Technology

2.1.6.1.1. Main purpose

2.1.6.1.2. Key question/issues that the author is addressing

2.1.6.1.3. Most important information in the article

2.1.6.1.4. Main inferences/conclusions in article

2.1.6.1.5. The key concept(s) we need to understand in this article is (are)

2.1.6.1.6. Main assumption(s) underlying the author's thinking is (are)

2.1.6.1.7. Implications

2.1.6.1.8. Main point(s) of view presented in this article is (are)

2.1.6.2. MOBILE LEARNING IN HIGHER EDUCATION: AN EMPIRICAL ASSESSMENT OF A NEW EDUCATIONAL TOOL The Turkish Online Journal of Educational Technology

2.1.6.2.1. Main purpose

2.1.6.2.2. Key question/issues that the author is addressing

2.1.6.2.3. Most important information in the article

2.1.6.2.4. Main inferences/conclusions in article

2.1.6.2.5. The key concept(s) we need to understand in this article is (are)

2.1.6.2.6. Main assumption(s) underlying the author's thinking is (are)

2.1.6.2.7. Implications

2.1.6.2.8. Main point(s) of view presented in this article is (are)

2.1.6.3. Online learning helps prepare pupils for university. Educational Journal

2.1.6.3.1. Main purpose

2.1.6.3.2. Key question/issues that the author is addressing

2.1.6.3.3. Most important information in the article

2.1.6.3.4. Main inferences/conclusions in article

2.1.6.3.5. The key concept(s) we need to understand in this article is (are)

2.1.6.3.6. Main assumption(s) underlying the author's thinking is (are)

2.1.6.3.7. Implications

2.1.6.3.8. Main point(s) of view presented in this article is (are)

2.1.6.4. Non-academic internet use in the classroom is negatively related to classroom learning regardless of intellectual ability. COMPUTERS AND EDUCATION

2.1.6.4.1. Main purpose

2.1.6.4.2. Key question/issues that the author is addressing

2.1.6.4.3. Most important information in the article

2.1.6.4.4. Main inferences/conclusions in article

2.1.6.4.5. The key concept(s) we need to understand in this article is (are)

2.1.6.4.6. Main assumption(s) underlying the author's thinking is (are)

2.1.6.4.7. Implications

2.1.6.4.8. Main point(s) of view presented in this article is (are)

2.1.6.5. Higher Education and Emerging Technologies: Shifting Trends in Student Usage The Journal of Academic Librarianship

2.1.6.5.1. Main purpose

2.1.6.5.2. Key question/issues that the author is addressing

2.1.6.5.3. Most important information in the article

2.1.6.5.4. Main inferences/conclusions in article

2.1.6.5.5. The key concept(s) we need to understand in this article is (are)

2.1.6.5.6. Main assumption(s) underlying the author's thinking is (are)

2.1.6.5.7. Implications

2.1.6.5.8. Main point(s) of view presented in this article is (are)

2.1.6.6. When Students Can't Go Online THE ATLANTIC

2.1.6.6.1. Main purpose

2.1.6.6.2. Key question/issues that the author is addressing

2.1.6.6.3. Most important information in the article

2.1.6.6.4. Main inferences/conclusions in article

2.1.6.6.5. The key concept(s) we need to understand in this article is (are)

2.1.6.6.6. Main assumption(s) underlying the author's thinking is (are)

2.1.6.6.7. Implications

2.1.6.6.8. Main point(s) of view presented in this article is (are)

2.1.6.7. Digital study may push some to web addiction TIMES HIGHER EDUCATION

2.1.6.7.1. Main purpose

2.1.6.7.2. Key question/issues that the author is addressing

2.1.6.7.3. Most important information in the article

2.1.6.7.4. Main inferences/conclusions in article

2.1.6.7.5. The key concept(s) we need to understand in this article is (are)

2.1.6.7.6. Main assumption(s) underlying the author's thinking is (are)

2.1.6.7.7. Implications

2.1.6.7.8. Main point(s) of view presented in this article is (are)

2.1.6.8. There's An App For That DIVERSE: ISSUES IN HIGHER EDUCATION

2.1.6.8.1. Main purpose

2.1.6.8.2. Key question/issues that the author is addressing

2.1.6.8.3. Most important information in the article

2.1.6.8.4. Main inferences/conclusions in article

2.1.6.8.5. The key concept(s) we need to understand in this article is (are)

2.1.6.8.6. Main assumption(s) underlying the author's thinking is (are)

2.1.6.8.7. Implications

2.1.6.8.8. Main point(s) of view presented in this article is (are)

2.1.7. Organization mind map for your paper

2.1.7.1. Free flow mind mapping

2.1.7.1.1. Body 1: What technology is being adopted?

2.1.7.1.2. Body 2: The positives

2.1.7.1.3. Body 3: The negatives

2.1.7.2. If you followed the Template for Analyzing the Logic of an Article, this part will be easier

2.1.8. Your final paper

2.1.8.1. Link to your final paper in Google Docs

2.2. Required branches (Student 2)

2.2.1. Selected Topic

2.2.1.1. Millennials

2.2.2. Research Question

2.2.2.1. Should more educational technologies be integrated into classrooms in order to meet the learning styles/preferences of the "digital natives?"

2.2.3. Focused research questions

2.2.3.1. What is a "millennial?"

2.2.3.2. How is information presented differently now versus the way it was presented in past generations (traditional education)?

2.2.3.3. What technologies do the millennials have access to now that past generations did not?

2.2.3.4. How have advancements of the Internet/technology affected the changes in the presentation of information over time?

2.2.3.5. In what ways has the Internet advanced over past years?

2.2.3.6. Do the learning styles/preferences of the "Millennials" provide equally valuable learning experiences as traditional education?

2.2.4. Search terms

2.2.4.1. digital natives (or) millennials (or) net generation

2.2.4.2. future of education (and) technology

2.2.4.3. digital native (and) learning preference

2.2.4.4. digital native (and) paradigm

2.2.4.5. communication style (and) digital native

2.2.4.6. human information processing (and) digital natives

2.2.4.7. Urban Education

2.2.4.8. traditional education

2.2.4.9. List most successful search queries

2.2.4.9.1. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-8535.2007.00793.x/abstract?deniedAccessCustomisedMessage=&userIsAuthenticated=false

2.2.4.9.2. https://books.google.com/books?id=q7nnrGWDMQcC&printsec=frontcover&dq=future+of+education+%28and%29+technology&hl=en&sa=X&ei=tWzrVLLADdjSoATK2IHQDg&ved=0CEMQ6AEwAw#v=onepage&q=future%20of%20education%20(and)%20technology&f=false

2.2.4.9.3. https://books.google.com/books?id=WjpN17C761wC&pg=PA24&dq=digital+native+%28and%29+learning+preference&hl=en&sa=X&ei=rm3rVPSHNsTZoATJ3oHgDg&ved=0CEIQ6AEwBg#v=onepage&q=digital%20native%20(and)%20learning%20preference&f=false

2.2.5. Final sources of information

2.2.5.1. The 'Digital Natives' Debate: A Critical Review of the Evidence

2.2.5.1.1. Secondary (analysis of primary sources)

2.2.5.1.2. Scholarly - British Journal of Educational Technology

2.2.5.1.3. Authority

2.2.5.1.4. September 1, 2008

2.2.5.1.5. Content: Provides analysis of evidence in regards to 'digital natives' and their learning preferences in contrast to the teaching styles of traditional education.

2.2.5.2. Meeting the 'Digital Natives' Understanding the Acceptance of Technology in Classrooms

2.2.5.2.1. Primary research done in China

2.2.5.2.2. Scholarly, Journal of Educational Technology & Society

2.2.5.2.3. Xiaoqing Gu,Yuankun Zhu, and Xiaofang Guo

2.2.5.2.4. January 1 2013

2.2.5.2.5. Content

2.2.5.3. Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants - Mark Prensky

2.2.5.3.1. Primary or Seondary

2.2.5.3.2. Popular or Scholarly

2.2.5.3.3. Authority

2.2.5.3.4. Currency

2.2.5.3.5. Content

2.2.5.4. Digital Books for Digital Natives: A Tour of Open Access Children's Digital Literature Collections - Cynthia Houston

2.2.5.4.1. Primary or Secondary

2.2.5.4.2. Popular or Scholarly

2.2.5.4.3. Authority

2.2.5.4.4. Currency

2.2.5.4.5. Content

2.2.5.5. Professor: I Banned Laptops from the Lecture Hall - James Loeffler

2.2.5.5.1. Primary or Secondary

2.2.5.5.2. Popular or Scholarly

2.2.5.5.3. Authority

2.2.5.5.4. Currency

2.2.5.5.5. Content

2.2.5.6. Digital Natives Looking to Unplug, Connect

2.2.5.6.1. Primary or Secondary

2.2.5.6.2. Popular or Scholarly

2.2.5.6.3. Authority

2.2.5.6.4. Currency

2.2.5.6.5. Content

2.2.6. Article analyses

2.2.6.1. The 'Digital Natives' Debate: A Critical Review of the Evidence

2.2.6.1.1. Main purpose

2.2.6.1.2. Key question/issues that the author is addressing

2.2.6.1.3. Most important information in the article

2.2.6.1.4. Main inferences/conclusions in article

2.2.6.1.5. The key concept(s) we need to understand in this article is (are)

2.2.6.1.6. Main assumption(s) underlying the author's thinking is (are)

2.2.6.1.7. Implications

2.2.6.1.8. Main point(s) of view presented in this article is (are)

2.2.6.2. Meeting the 'Digital Natives' Understanding the Acceptance of Technology in Classrooms

2.2.6.2.1. Main purpose

2.2.6.2.2. Key question/issues that the author is addressing

2.2.6.2.3. Most important information in the article

2.2.6.2.4. Main inferences/conclusions in article

2.2.6.2.5. The key concept(s) we need to understand in this article is (are)

2.2.6.2.6. Main assumption(s) underlying the author's thinking is (are)

2.2.6.2.7. Implications

2.2.6.2.8. Main point(s) of view presented in this article is (are)

2.2.6.3. Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants - Mark Prensky

2.2.6.3.1. Main Purpose

2.2.6.3.2. Key Questions/Issues that the Author is Addressing

2.2.6.3.3. Most Important Information in the Article

2.2.6.3.4. Main Inferences/Conclusions in the Article

2.2.6.3.5. The key concept(s) we need to understand in this article is (are)

2.2.6.3.6. Main assumption(s) underlying the author's thinking is (are)

2.2.6.3.7. Implications

2.2.6.3.8. Main point(s) of view presented in this article is (are)

2.2.6.4. Digital Books for Digital Natives: A Tour of Open Access Children's Digital Literature Collections - Cynthia Houston

2.2.6.4.1. Main Purpose

2.2.6.4.2. Key Questions/Issues that the author is addressing

2.2.6.4.3. Most important information in the article

2.2.6.4.4. Main inferences/conclusions in article

2.2.6.4.5. The key concept(s) we need to understand in this article is (are)

2.2.6.4.6. Main assumption(s) underlying the author's thinking is (are)

2.2.6.4.7. Implications

2.2.6.4.8. Main Point(s) of view presented in this article is (are)

2.2.6.5. Professor: I Banned Laptops from the Lecture Hall - James Loeffler

2.2.6.5.1. Main Purpose

2.2.6.5.2. Key Questions/Issues that the author is addresing

2.2.6.5.3. Most important information in the article

2.2.6.5.4. Main inferences/conclusions in the article

2.2.6.5.5. They key concept(s) we need to understand in this article is (are)

2.2.6.5.6. Implications

2.2.6.5.7. Main point(s) of view presented in this article is (are)

2.2.6.6. Digital Natives Looking to Unplug, Connect - Jody Passanisi and Shara Peters

2.2.6.6.1. Main Purpose

2.2.6.6.2. Key questions/issues the author is addressing

2.2.6.6.3. Most important information in the article

2.2.6.6.4. Main inferences/conclusions in the article

2.2.6.6.5. They key concept(s) we need to understand in this article is (are)

2.2.6.6.6. Implications

2.2.6.6.7. Main point(s) of view presented in this article is (are)

2.2.7. Organization mind map for your paper

2.2.7.1. Free flow mind mapping

2.2.7.1.1. Introduction

2.2.7.1.2. Body Paragraph 1

2.2.7.1.3. Body Paragraph 2

2.2.7.1.4. Body Paragraph 3

2.2.7.1.5. Body Paragraph 4

2.2.7.1.6. Body Paragraph 5

2.2.7.1.7. Body Paragraph 6

2.2.7.1.8. Conclusion

2.2.7.2. If you followed the Template for Analyzing the Logic of an Article, this part will be easier

2.2.8. Your final paper

2.2.8.1. Link to Research Paper - Laurie Haynes

2.3. Required branches (Student 3)

2.3.1. Selected topic

2.3.1.1. Youth and Teens

2.3.2. Main research question

2.3.2.1. In what ways is mobile communication changing the way that teens interact with each other?

2.3.3. Focused research questions

2.3.3.1. What is the definition of mobile communication?

2.3.3.2. How is interaction among teens measured?

2.3.3.3. How are teens being measured to how they were interacting prior to mobile communication?

2.3.3.4. What types of mobile communication show the most influential change in interaction style?

2.3.4. Search terms

2.3.4.1. List all appropriate Search terms here

2.3.4.1.1. Teen interaction style

2.3.4.1.2. Mobile devices, smart phone

2.3.4.1.3. communication styles

2.3.4.1.4. change of communication styles

2.3.4.1.5. Milennial generation communication style

2.3.4.1.6. Generation X communication style

2.3.4.1.7. smart phone and behavior changes

2.3.4.1.8. interpersonal communication

2.3.4.1.9. Mobile interaction

2.3.4.1.10. Texting and behavior changes in teens

2.3.4.2. List most successful search queries

2.3.4.2.1. milennial communicaiton style

2.3.4.2.2. Interpersonal communication in teens

2.3.4.2.3. smartphone behavior changes in teens

2.3.5. Final sources of information

2.3.5.1. Article 1: Motives for Communication: Why the Millennial Generation Uses Electronic Devices

2.3.5.1.1. Secondary

2.3.5.1.2. Scholarly

2.3.5.1.3. Judy C. Pearson, Ph.D., Anna Carmon, M.A., Cloy Tobola, M.A., & Michael Fowler, M.A. to this was off proper authority i made sure that these authors all had the proper degrees.

2.3.5.1.4. 2009/2010 these dates are relevant to my topic because i will be looking at both past and current generations of teens, and these years fall in the correct timeline.

2.3.5.1.5. This article illustrated how teenagers are dependent on their phones and how they can become lonely overtime.

2.3.5.2. Article 2: Online Communication and Adolescent Well-Being: Testing the Stimulation Versus the Displacement Hypothesis

2.3.5.2.1. Secondary

2.3.5.2.2. Scholarly

2.3.5.2.3. Patti M. Valkenburg, and Jochen Peter

2.3.5.2.4. August 2007, this works because it pertains to my research question

2.3.5.2.5. this article talks about the effect of online communication in teenagers and their well-being through a series of surveys and research.

2.3.5.3. Article 3: Optimizing Millennials’ Communication Styles

2.3.5.3.1. Secodary

2.3.5.3.2. Scholarly

2.3.5.3.3. Jackie L. Hartman Kansas State University; Jim McCambridge Colorado State University,

2.3.5.3.4. May 2011, this article is current enough that I am able to look at that generation and their communication styles

2.3.5.3.5. this article focuses on teens during the time period of 1980-200 although these years are from a long time ago, it is helpful because i will be able to compare the communication styles from back then to more recent ones.

2.3.5.4. Article 4: "Generation Y – Our Communication Rules Have Changed"

2.3.5.4.1. Secondary

2.3.5.4.2. Popular

2.3.5.4.3. Bob Kelleher , President and Founder, The Employee Engagement Group

2.3.5.4.4. 2015, these dates are relevant because it can compare different generations even most recent ones

2.3.5.4.5. 2015, this is relevant to my topic because it addresses the communication strategies of different generations

2.3.5.5. Article 5 Generational stereotyping and group communication (arst.org)

2.3.5.5.1. Secondary

2.3.5.5.2. popular

2.3.5.5.3. Laura L Ochs, MEd, R.T.(T) Robert D Adams, EdD, R.T.(R)(T), CMD

2.3.5.5.4. This article talks about the stereotypes and group communication aspects of different generations

2.3.5.6. Article 6: The Social and Cultural Characteristics of Generational Age Groups

2.3.5.6.1. Secondary

2.3.5.6.2. popular

2.3.5.6.3. Gary Quehl

2.3.5.6.4. this article talks about how the social and cultural environment of different generations effects their method of communication

2.3.6. Article analyses

2.3.6.1. Article 1: Motives for Communication: Why the Millennial Generation Uses Electronic Devices

2.3.6.1.1. Main purpose

2.3.6.1.2. Key Questions/ Issues

2.3.6.1.3. most important info in article

2.3.6.1.4. main reference/ conclusions

2.3.6.1.5. key concepts

2.3.6.1.6. main assumptions

2.3.6.1.7. implications

2.3.6.1.8. main points of view presented in this article

2.3.6.2. Article 2: Online Communication and Adolescent Well-Being: Testing the Stimulation Versus the Displacement Hypothesis

2.3.6.2.1. Main purpose

2.3.6.2.2. Most important info.

2.3.6.2.3. main inferences/ conclusions

2.3.6.2.4. key concepts

2.3.6.2.5. Main assumptions

2.3.6.2.6. implications

2.3.6.2.7. main points of view

2.3.6.3. Article 3: Optimizing Millennial's Communication Style

2.3.6.3.1. Main Purpose

2.3.6.3.2. Key questions/ issues that the author is addressing

2.3.6.3.3. most important information in the article

2.3.6.3.4. main inferences/ conclusions in the article

2.3.6.3.5. key concepts

2.3.6.3.6. main assumptions

2.3.6.3.7. implications

2.3.6.3.8. main points of view presented in the article

2.3.6.4. Article 4: "Generation Y – Our Communication Rules Have Changed"

2.3.6.4.1. Main Purpose

2.3.6.4.2. Key Question

2.3.6.4.3. Most Important information in article

2.3.6.4.4. main inferences/ conclsuions

2.3.6.4.5. key concept

2.3.6.4.6. main assumptions

2.3.6.4.7. implications

2.3.6.4.8. main points of view

2.3.6.5. Article 5 Generational stereotyping and group communication (arst.org)

2.3.6.5.1. main purpose

2.3.6.5.2. key question

2.3.6.5.3. most important info

2.3.6.5.4. main inferences

2.3.6.5.5. key concept

2.3.6.5.6. main assumptions

2.3.6.5.7. main points of view

2.3.6.6. Article 6: The Social and Cultural Characteristics of Generational Age Groups

2.3.6.6.1. Main purpose

2.3.6.6.2. key question

2.3.6.6.3. most important info

2.3.6.6.4. main inferences

2.3.6.6.5. key concept

2.3.6.6.6. main assumptions

2.3.6.6.7. main points of view

2.3.7. Organization mind map for your paper

2.3.7.1. Free flow mind mapping

2.3.7.1.1. Up to you

2.3.7.2. If you followed the Template for Analyzing the Logic of an Article, this part will be easier

2.3.8. Your final paper

2.3.8.1. Final Paper