Thesis: Throughout the story of Othello, Iago has been a two-faced character, in which he influen...

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Thesis: Throughout the story of Othello, Iago has been a two-faced character, in which he influences the other characters' ethical judgments. by Mind Map: Thesis: Throughout the story of Othello, Iago has been a two-faced character, in which he influences the other characters' ethical judgments.

1. Iago - Iago is a character, in which he is depicted as "two-faced." In act 1, scene 2, line 33, he swears by Janus, the god of doorways and beginnings. Janus is also seen as a "two-faced" god.

2. Iago manipulates multiple characters at a time, which allows him to change the judgments of some people, all while being perceived as an honest bystander.

2.1. Throughout act 2, scene 3, Iago chats with Cassio about Desdemona, as a friend. He even suggests that Othello doesn't deserve her because he is black. Later on in the scene however, Iago exposes to Othello, that Cassio has been "getting closer" to Desdemona.

3. Iago has been loyal and kind to Othello since the beginning of the story. Due to this, Iago was seen as a trustworthy" source.

3.1. In act 3, scene 3, line 479, Othello upgrades Iago to be his lieutenant. This shows that Iago can manipulate Othello into getting what he wants.

3.2. Iago is not only trusted by Othello, but by Cassio and Desdemona as well.

3.2.1. In act 3, scene 3, line 5, Desdemona addresses Iago as "an honest fellow." This means that Desdemona doesn't suspect Iago with any type of foul play.

3.3. In act 3, scene 3, lines 321-480, Iago tells a lie to Othello about Casio "making a move" on Desdemona, as well as Desdemona agreeing with it. Othello trusts him so much, that he replaces Cassio with Iago, and he starts developing hatred towards Desdemona.

4. During his many soliloquies, Iago plans out his schemes and the different ways things can go.

4.1. Act 5, scene 1, line 14. Iago talks to himself about his plan for Rodrigo and Cassio. He plots out all the different possibilities, and in the end, he realizes that through any scenario, he always gets something out of it.

4.2. Act 2, scene 2, lines 275-301. Iago plans out the scheme involving Cassio, Desdemona, and Othello. His plan was to put the Moor (Othello) in such a state of jealousy, that his ethical judgement won't interfere with his actions. Iago also mentions that he will have Cassio at his mercy, which is a good thing for Iago because Cassio would be someone who praises Iago publicly This would strengthen the bond between Iago and Othello..