Jisc SOSI How to engage with and sell to HE

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Jisc SOSI How to engage with and sell to HE by Mind Map: Jisc SOSI How to engage with and sell to HE

1. Challenges

1.1. University structures complex - collection of fiefdoms

1.2. Knowing who to engage with

1.2.1. Who has the problem at senior level

1.2.2. Who can take action at operational level

1.2.3. Who are the likely influencers

1.2.4. Who are the users

1.2.5. Who can internally sell / scale-up

1.2.6. Who has budgets

1.2.7. Who are the bean counters

1.2.8. Choosing to deal at local or institutional levels

1.3. Adapting to different cultures / terminology / different university types

1.4. Dealing with competitive purchasing

1.5. Central purchasing often risk-averse wrt innovations

1.6. Knowing when to sell a pilot, a scaling up of an innovation or a "mature" product

1.7. Universities are not good at scaling-up innovations

1.8. Dealing with pre-planned budgets

1.9. Timing - when is the right time of year?

1.10. Getting on the supplier list

1.11. Dealing with objections

1.12. Local level - potentially smallish budgets

1.13. Sustainability - are you likely not to last?

1.14. T&L not on parity with research in most of HE

2. Organisation

2.1. Chancellor

2.2. Governors

2.3. Executive board

2.3.1. Vice Chancellor (VC)

2.3.2. Deputy Vice-chancellors - DVCs

2.3.2.1. Pro Vice Chancellors (PVCs)

2.3.2.1.1. Education

2.3.2.1.2. Research

2.3.2.1.3. International

2.3.3. Registrar / secretary

2.3.4. Head of finance

2.3.5. Head of information/IT services

2.3.6. Head of student experience

2.3.7. Head of human resources

2.3.8. Head of estates and facilities

2.3.9. Head of legal services

2.3.10. Head of employer engagement

2.3.11. Head of business development / internationalisation / innovation

2.3.12. Head of strategy

2.3.13. Head of marketing communications

2.4. Academic faculties / schools / departments / colleges

2.4.1. Deans of faculties / Pro Vice Chancellors (PVCs)

2.4.1.1. Heads of schools/departments

2.4.1.2. Heads of quality assurance

2.4.1.3. Associate Deans e.g. teaching and learning, research

2.5. Academic support and development

2.5.1. Head of academic support and development

2.5.1.1. Teaching and learning

2.5.1.1.1. Educational development

2.5.1.1.2. Quality enhancement

2.5.1.1.3. Blended learning

2.5.1.2. Research

2.6. Business development / international / employer engagement

2.7. Student experience

2.8. Research & innovation

2.9. Operations & resources

2.9.1. Estates and hospitality

2.9.2. Fundraising / alumni

2.9.3. Access and community relations

2.9.4. Financial, legal and business services

2.9.5. Human resources

2.9.6. Information services, IT

2.9.7. Registry

2.9.8. Libraries, research & learning resources

2.9.9. Marketing and communications

2.9.10. Procurement

2.10. Student union

3. Channels for marketing / selling

3.1. Jisc

3.1.1. Jisc staff e.g. account managers

3.1.2. Jisc specialists

3.1.2.1. IT

3.1.2.2. Data analytics

3.1.2.3. TL&A

3.1.2.4. Research

3.1.2.5. Libraries & information services

3.1.2.6. Copyright and IPR

3.1.2.7. Technologies

3.1.3. Jisc App store

3.1.4. Jisc sector events

3.1.5. Jisc events

3.2. Academic units

3.2.1. Faculties

3.2.2. Departments / schools / colleges

3.3. Central operations and resources units

3.3.1. Estates and hospitality

3.3.2. Fundraising / alumni

3.3.3. Access and community relations

3.3.4. Financial, legal and business services

3.3.5. Human resources

3.3.6. Information services, IT

3.3.7. Libraries, research & learning resources

3.3.8. Marketing and communications

3.3.9. Procurement

3.4. Institutional professional support services staff

3.4.1. Blended learning

3.4.2. Educational development

3.4.3. IT / MIS

3.4.4. Quality assurance

3.4.5. Employability / careers

3.4.6. Employer engagement

3.5. Institutional forums

3.5.1. Annual T&L conferences

3.5.2. Communities of interest / user groups

3.6. Sector forums

3.6.1. Jisc Student Experience group

3.6.2. Conferences

3.6.2.1. HEA

3.6.2.2. QAA

3.6.2.3. Jisc

3.7. Sector agencies

3.7.1. Leadership Foundation for HE

3.7.2. HEA

3.7.3. QAA

3.7.4. HESA

3.7.5. CRA

3.7.6. SRHE

3.7.7. UCAS

3.8. Technology companies including EDTech companies

3.9. University partnerships / consortia

3.9.1. Southern Universities Purchasing Consortium

3.9.2. London Universities Purchasing Consortium

3.9.3. Research pooling e.g. Research Consortia in Scotland

3.10. Social media e.g.

3.10.1. LinkedIn

3.10.2. Facebook

3.10.3. Twitter

3.10.4. Student Room

3.11. Online open educational resources

3.12. University / employer forums

4. Key performance / impact agendas in HE

4.1. TEF - Teaching Excellence Framework

4.1.1. Teaching quality e.g.

4.1.1.1. Students engagted with teaching evaluation

4.1.1.2. Student engagement with studies

4.1.1.3. Recognition by PSRBs

4.1.1.4. Preventing grade inflation

4.1.1.5. Teaching intensity e.g. weighted contact hours

4.1.1.6. Extermal examining

4.1.1.7. Teaching observation schemes

4.1.1.8. Innovative teaching / new technologies

4.1.1.9. Quality of staff

4.1.1.10. Assessment for learning

4.1.2. Learning environment

4.1.2.1. Student transitions

4.1.2.2. Investment in T&L infrastructure

4.1.2.3. Learner analytics

4.1.2.4. Employer engagement with course design/delivery

4.1.2.5. Student engagement with professional practice, research, scholarship

4.1.3. Student outcomes / learning gain

4.1.3.1. Schemes to analyse and improve retention and completion

4.1.3.2. Llearnming gain

4.1.3.3. Long-term employment outcomes

4.1.3.4. Progression into highly skilled employment

4.1.3.5. Gradate employability

4.1.3.6. Student involvement in enterprise and entrepreneurship

4.1.3.7. GPA / measuring progress

4.1.3.8. Widening participation - development, attainment and progression

4.2. REF - Research Excellence Framework

4.2.1. Outputs

4.2.1.1. Originality

4.2.1.2. Significance

4.2.1.3. Rigour

4.2.2. Impact

4.2.2.1. Economy

4.2.2.2. Society

4.2.2.3. Culture

4.2.2.4. Enabling impact

4.2.3. Research environment

4.2.3.1. Vitality

4.2.3.2. Sustainability

4.3. NSS - National Student Survey

4.3.1. Teaching

4.3.2. Assessment and feedback

4.3.3. Academic support

4.3.4. Organisation and management

4.3.5. Learning resources

4.3.6. Personal development

4.3.7. Overall satisfaction

4.4. League tables / rankings

4.4.1. The Complete University Guide

4.4.2. The Guardian

4.4.3. Times

4.4.4. Global rankings

4.4.4.1. Academic Ranking of World Universities

4.4.4.2. QS World University Rankings

4.4.4.3. Times HE World University Rankings

4.5. DLHE - destination of leavers in HE

4.6. Recruitment, retention & completion

4.7. Efficiencies / lean / agile working

4.8. Return on investments

4.9. Reputation / brand

4.10. Financial

4.11. IP / business /international growth

4.12. Engagement with different stakeholders e.g. local community, employers, alumni, colleges, schools, voluntary organisations

4.13. HESA statistics

4.14. Course information

5. Key tips

5.1. Focus on needs and benefits of the product for different stakeholders - link to performance/impact measures

5.2. Keep to brief, simple language - what your product is and why it is needed and by whom

5.3. Professionalism at all times

5.4. Network , network, network

5.5. Listen, listen, listen

5.6. Don't wait until the product is perfect

5.7. Aim to get the customer to pay for something soon (without hard sell), however small e.g. a workshop, new feature development, survey, pilot

5.8. Avoid hard-sells with academics

5.9. Develop, maintain and improve your street-cred

5.10. Continually evaluate, collect evidence and testimonials

6. Product life-cycle

6.1. Product research / development

6.2. Marketing / promotion

6.3. Selling

6.4. Maintenance and support

6.5. Continuous improvement

6.6. Identify/develop new features and new products