VOLUME 2: SEBTS PHD MIND MAP (WWW.EVANGELICALETHICS.COM)

This page contains my seminar level PhD work. You had the broadest education during college (humanities, math, science, etc). Your graduate work then digs into a specific field (theology and ethics). Your seminary doctoral work focuses on specific disciplines (political and theological ethics). You take generic post-graduate level seminars where you write large papers, and then debate colleges. After your seminars, you enter the comprehensive exam, prospectus, and dissertation stages. Your co...

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1. CHAPTER 2 – THEOLOGY

1.1. THE9900: SEMINAR IN CONTEMPORARY THEOLOGY

1.1.1. THE9900: Contemporary Theology

1.1.2. Notes

1.1.3. Readings

1.1.3.1. Grenz & Olson, 20th Century Theology

1.1.3.1.1. OUTLINE

1.1.3.1.2. SUMMARY

1.1.3.1.3. CRITIQUE

1.1.3.1.4. QUOTES

1.1.3.1.5. QUESTIONS

1.1.3.2. Schleiermacher, Friedrich. On Religion

1.1.3.2.1. OUTLINE

1.1.3.2.2. SUMMARY

1.1.3.2.3. CRITIQUE

1.1.3.2.4. QUOTES

1.1.3.2.5. QUESTIONS

1.1.3.3. Barth, Karl. Church Dogmatics 1.1 The Doctrine of the Word of God

1.1.3.3.1. OUTLINE

1.1.3.3.2. SUMMARY

1.1.3.3.3. CRITIQUE

1.1.3.3.4. QUOTES

1.1.3.3.5. QUESTIONS

1.1.3.4. Barth, Karl. Evangelical Theology

1.1.3.4.1. OUTLINE

1.1.3.4.2. SUMMARY

1.1.3.4.3. CRITIQUE

1.1.3.4.4. QUOTES

1.1.3.4.5. QUESTION

1.1.3.5. Niebuhr, Richard H. Christ & Culture

1.1.3.5.1. OUTLINE

1.1.3.5.2. SUMMARY

1.1.3.5.3. CRITIQUE

1.1.3.5.4. TERMS

1.1.3.5.5. QUOTES

1.1.3.5.6. QUESTIONS

1.1.3.6. Hauerwas, The Hauerwas Reader

1.1.3.6.1. PART I: INTRODUCTION

1.1.3.6.2. PART II: REFRAMING THEOLOGICAL ETHICS

1.1.3.6.3. PART III: NEW INTERSECTIONS IN THEOLOGICAL ETHICS

1.1.3.7. Wright, How God Became King

1.1.3.7.1. ONE: THE EMPTY CLOAK

1.1.3.7.2. TWO: ADJUSTING THE VOLUME

1.1.3.7.3. THREE: THE KINGDOM AND THE CROSS

1.1.3.7.4. FOUR: CREED, CANON AND GOSPEL

1.1.3.7.5. BOOK REVIEW

1.1.4. Handouts

1.1.5. Study Guides

1.2. THE9750: SEMINAR IN ECCLESIOLOGY

1.2.1. THE9750: Seminar on Ecclesiology

1.2.2. Notes

1.2.3. Readings

1.2.3.1. Cyprian, De Unitate, Letter 33, 69 and 73, in The Library of Christian Classics, Early Latin Theology

1.2.3.1.1. Cyprian, General Introduction

1.2.3.1.2. Cyprian. De Unitate.

1.2.3.1.3. Cyprian, Letter 33: The Problem of the Lapsed

1.2.3.1.4. Cyprian, Letter 69 and 73: The Baptismal Controversy

1.2.3.2. J.N.D. Kelly, Early Christian Doctrines

1.2.3.2.1. CHAPTER VIII: THE CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY

1.2.3.2.2. CHAPTER XV: CHRIST'S MYSTICAL BODY

1.2.3.2.3. CHAPTER XVI: THE LATER DOCTRINE OF THE SACRAMENTS

1.2.3.3. E. Glenn Hinson, Understandings of the Church

1.2.3.3.1. AN OVERVIEW

1.2.3.3.2. THE SELECTIONS

1.2.3.4. Gregory the Great, The Book of Pastoral Rule, in Christian Classics, Medieval Christianity

1.2.3.4.1. 1. GREGORY THE GREAT

1.2.3.4.2. The Book of Pastoral Rule

1.2.3.5. Benedict, The Rule of Saint Benedict, in Western Asceticism

1.2.3.5.1. INTRODUCTION

1.2.3.5.2. The Rule of Saint Benedict

1.2.3.6. St Thomas Aquinas Theological Texts

1.2.3.6.1. CHURCH: "The entire Church is called a single mystical body, by analogy with a human physical body which performs different functions through different members." (337)

1.2.3.6.2. Order, perfection, power

1.2.3.6.3. "Church means congregartion. Holy Church id the congregation of believers which each Christian is a member" (340)

1.2.3.6.4. FOUR MARKS: "The Church has four marks, being one, holy, cartholic or universal, and strong or lasting." (340)

1.2.3.6.5. "the Church is like the Ark of Noah, outside of which nobody can be saved." (341)

1.2.3.6.6. UNIVERSAL: "The Church is catholic, that is, universal. First with regard to place: we have received grace and apostheship for obedience to his faith, in all nations . . . The Church has three parts, one on earth, a second in heaven, a third in purgatory. The Church is universal with regard to all conditions of human beings; nobody is rejected . . . It is universal in time, and those are wrong who allow it is a limited span f time, for it began with Abel and will last even to the end of the world" (341-342, Exposition, Apostles Creed)

1.2.3.6.7. 1. TEACHING AUTHORITY

1.2.3.6.8. 2. THE SACRAMENTS

1.2.3.6.9. 3. DISCIPLINE

1.2.3.7. Timothy George, Theology of the Reformers

1.2.3.7.1. 2. THE THIRST FOR GOD, THEOLOGY AND SPIRITUAL LIFE IN THE LATE MIDDLE AGES

1.2.3.8. Scott Hendrix, "In Quest of the Vera Ecclesia: The Crises of Late Medieval Ecclesiology" in Viator 7 (1976)

1.2.3.8.1. "Reform on the model of the apostolic ideal was also the mother of dissent in the early Middle Ages." (347-348)

1.2.3.8.2. "Late medieval society manifested this heightened sense of insecurity in several domains: economic instability, social unrest, urban tension, national feeling. For Graus, however, spiritual values are more crucial than socio-economic factors to any analysis of the causes of a crisis in a society. These spiritual values were particularly threatened by the religious perplexity provoked by the Great Schism of the Western church. Thus Graus regards the crisis of the late Middle Ages as coming to a head in the crisis of the confidence in the identity and authority of the church." (351)

1.2.3.8.3. THESIS: "The purpose of the present essay is to examine selected expressions of this quest from the perspective of Graus, that is, to view the ecclesiologies which arose out of this quest as responses of late medieval people to the uncertainty surrounding the church's nature and authority." (351)

1.2.3.8.4. PART I

1.2.3.8.5. PART II

1.2.3.8.6. PART III

1.2.3.8.7. PART IV

1.2.3.8.8. PART V

1.2.3.9. Martin Luther, On the Councils and the Church, in Martin Luther's Basic Theological Writings

1.2.3.9.1. On the Councils and the Church

1.2.3.10. John Calvin, The Institutes, in Christian Classics Ethereal Library (CCEL)

1.2.3.10.1. BOOK IV

1.2.3.11. Dietrich Philips, The Church of God, in The Library of Christian Classics, Spiritual and Anabaptist Writers

1.2.3.11.1. Dietrich Philips, The Church of God

1.2.3.12. Martin Luther, The Babylonian Captivity of the Church--Part 1 (1520), in Martin Luther's Basic Theological Writings

1.2.3.12.1. INTRODUCTION

1.2.3.12.2. TEXT

1.2.3.13. Martin Luther, Concerning Rebaptism (1528), in Martin Luther's Basic Theological Writings

1.2.3.13.1. INTRODUCTION

1.2.3.13.2. TEXT

1.2.3.14. Martin Luther, Confessions Concerning Christ's Supper--From Part I (1528), in Martin Luther's Basic Theological Writings

1.2.3.14.1. INTRODUCTION

1.2.3.14.2. TEXT

1.2.3.15. Martin Luther, The Marburg Articles (1529), in Martin Luther's Basic Theological Writings

1.2.3.15.1. INTRODUCTION

1.2.3.15.2. TEXT

1.2.3.16. Martin Luther, Concerning the Order of Public Worship (1523), in Martin Luther's Basic Theological Writings

1.2.3.16.1. INTRODUCTION

1.2.3.16.2. TEXT

1.2.3.17. Martin Luther, An Order of Mass and Communion for the Church at Wittenberg (1523), in Martin Luther's Basic Theological Writings

1.2.3.17.1. INTRODUCTION

1.2.3.17.2. TEXT

1.2.3.18. Zwingli, On the Lord's Supper, in The library of Christian Classics

1.2.3.18.1. On the Lord's Supper

1.2.3.19. Balthasar Hubmaier, On the Christian Baptism of Believers, in Balthasar Hubmaier: Theologian of Anabaptism

1.2.3.19.1. INTRODUCTION

1.2.3.19.2. TEXT

1.2.3.20. The Schleitheim Confession (1527)

1.2.3.20.1. gameo.org > Index ? ...

1.2.3.20.2. 1 The Cover Letter (Introductory)

1.2.3.20.3. 2 The Seven Articles

1.2.3.20.4. 3 The Cover Letter

1.2.3.20.5. 4 Congregational Order

1.2.3.21. First London Baptist Confession (1646)

1.2.3.21.1. theopedia.com > First London Baptist Confession

1.2.3.21.2. baptiststart.com > Print > 1646 london

1.2.3.21.3. PURPOSE: "A confession of faith of seven congregations or churches of Christ in London, which are commonly, but unjustly, called Anabaptists; published for the vindication of the truth and information of the ignorant; likewise for the taking off those aspersions which are frequently, both in pulpit and print, unjustly cast upon them. Printed in London, Anno 1646."

1.2.3.21.4. III. ELECTION: "And God hath before the foundation of the world, foreordained some men to eternal life, through Jesus Christ, to the praise and glory of His grace; leaving the rest in their sin to their just condemnation, to the praise of His justice."

1.2.3.21.5. VII. ETERNAL LIFE: "And this is life eternal, that we might know Him the only true God, and Jesus Christ whom He hath sent."

1.2.3.21.6. VIII SCRIPTURE - THE RULE OF FAITH: "The rule of this knowledge, faith, and obedience, concerning the worship of God, in which is contained the whole duty of man, is (not men's laws, or unwritten traditions, but) only the word of God contained in the holy Scriptures; in which is plainly recorded whatsoever is needful for us to know, believe, and practice; which are the only rule of holiness and obedience for all saints, at all times, in all places to be observed."

1.2.3.21.7. XIII. CHRIST THE ONLY MEDIATOR [VS. PAPACY]: "This office to be mediator, that is, to be prophet, priest, and king of the Church of God, is so proper to Christ, that neither in whole, or any part thereof, it cannot be transferred from Him to any other."

1.2.3.21.8. CHRIST AS PROPHET, PRIEST, AND KING (XIII-XX)

1.2.3.21.9. XXXIII. THE CHURCH: "Jesus Christ hath here on earth a [manifestation of His] spiritual kingdom, which is His Church, whom He hath purchased and redeemed to Himself as a peculiar inheritance; which Church is a company of visible saints, called and separated from the world by the word and Spirit of God, to the visible profession of faith of the gospel, being baptized into that faith, and joined to the Lord, and each other, by mutual agreement in the practical enjoyment of the ordinances commanded by Christ their head and king."

1.2.3.21.10. XXXV: SUPPLYING ONE ANOTHER'S NEEDS: "and to supply each others wants, inward and outward; (and although each person hath a propriety in his own estate, yet they are to supply each others wants, according as their necessities shall require, that the name of Jesus Christ may not be blasphemed through the necessity of any in the Church)"

1.2.3.21.11. XXXVI. COMMON CONSENT ELECTING ELDERS & DEACONS: "Being thus joined, every church hath power given them from Christ, for their wellbeing, to choose among themselves meet persons for elders and deacons, being qualified according to the word, as those which Christ hath appointed in His testament, for the feeding, governing, serving, and building up of His Church; and that none have any power to impose on them either these or any other."

1.2.3.21.12. XXXIX. BAPTISM: "Baptism is an ordinance of the New Testament, given by Christ, to be dispensed upon persons professing faith, or that are made disciples; who upon profession of faith, ought to be baptized, and after to partake of the Lord's Supper."

1.2.3.21.13. XLVII. COMPACT, PARTICULAR CONGREGATION: "And although the particular congregations be distinct, and several bodies, every one as a compact and knit city within itself; yet are they all to walk by one rule of truth; so also they (by all means convenient) are to have the counsel and help one of another, if necessity require it, as members of one body, in the common faith, under Christ their head."

1.2.3.21.14. XLVIII. THE MAGISTRATE: "A civil magistracy is an ordinance of God, set up by Him for the punishment of evil doers, and for the praise of them that do well; and that in all lawful things, commanded by them, subjection ought to be given by us in the Lord, not only for wrath, but for conscience sake; and that we are to make supplications and prayers for kings, and all that are in authority, that under them we may live a quiet and peaceable life, in all godliness and honesty."

1.2.3.21.15. L. AGAINST THE ANABAPTISTS: "It is lawful for a Christian to be a magistrate or civil officer; and also it is lawful to take an oath, so it be in truth, and in judgment, and in righteousness, for confirmation of truth, and ending of all strife; and that by wrath and vain oaths the Lord is provoked and this land mourns."

1.2.3.21.16. NOTE: Main themes can be seen in asserting a calvinist perspective that often emphasizes election, in emphasizing the supreme spiritual government that consists of the kingship of Christ (via the priest/prophet/king treatments), and in pushing back against the Anabaptist positions on government by arguing that it is lawful to be a servant in government.

1.2.3.22. Second London Baptist Confession (1689)

1.2.3.22.1. en.wikipedia.org > Wiki > 1689 Baptist Confession of Faith

1.2.3.22.2. CHAPTER 1: OF THE HOLY SCRIPTURES

1.2.3.22.3. CHAPTER 2: OF GOD AND OF THE HOLY TRINITY

1.2.3.22.4. CHAPTER 3: OF GOD'S DECREE

1.2.3.22.5. CHAPTER 4: OF CREATION

1.2.3.22.6. CHAPTER 5: OF DIVINE PROVIDENCE

1.2.3.22.7. CHAPTER 6: OF THE FALL OF MAN, OF SIN, AND OF THE PUNISHMENT THEREOF

1.2.3.22.8. CHAPTER 7: OF GOD'S COVENANT

1.2.3.22.9. CHAPTER 8: OF CHRIST THE MEDIATOR

1.2.3.22.10. CHAPTER 9: OF FREE WILL

1.2.3.22.11. CHAPTER 10: OF EFFECTUAL CALLING

1.2.3.22.12. CHAPTER 11: OF JUSTIFICATION

1.2.3.22.13. CHAPTER 12: ADOPTION

1.2.3.22.14. CHAPTER 13: OF SACTIFICATION

1.2.3.22.15. CHAPTER 14: OF SAVING FAITH

1.2.3.22.16. CHAPTER 15: OF REPENTANCE UNTO LIFE AND SALVATION:

1.2.3.22.17. CHAPTER 16: OF GOOD WORKS

1.2.3.22.18. CHAPTER 17: OF THE PERSEVERANCE OF THE SAINTS

1.2.3.22.19. CHAPTER 18: OF THE ASSURANCE OF GRACE AND SALVATION

1.2.3.22.20. CHAPTER 19: OF THE LAW OF GOD

1.2.3.22.21. CHAPTER 20: OF THE GOSPEL AND OF THE EXTENT OF THE GRACE THEREOF

1.2.3.22.22. CHAPTER 21: OF CHRISTIAN LIBERTY AND LIBERTY OF CONSCIENCE

1.2.3.22.23. CHAPTER 22: OF RELIGIOUS WORSHIP AND THE SABBATH DAY

1.2.3.22.24. CHAPTER 23: OF LAWFUL OATHS AND VOWS

1.2.3.22.25. CHAPTER 24: OF THE MAGISTRATE

1.2.3.22.26. CHAPTER 25: OF MARRIAGE

1.2.3.22.27. CHAPTER 26: OF THE CHURCH

1.2.3.22.28. CHAPTER 27: OF THE COMMUNION OF THE SAINTS

1.2.3.22.29. CHAPTER 28: OF BAPTISM AND THE LORD'S SUPPER

1.2.3.22.30. CHAPTER 29: OF BAPTISM

1.2.3.22.31. CHAPTER 30: OF THE LORD'S SUPPER

1.2.3.22.32. CHAPTER 31: OF THE STATE OF MAN AFTER DEATH, AND OF THE RESURRECTION OF THE DEAD

1.2.3.23. An Orthodox Creed: Or, a Protestant Confession of Faith (1679)

1.2.3.23.1. baptiststudiesonline.com > Wp-content > Uploads > 2007 > 02 > Orthodox-creed

1.2.3.23.2. I. Article. Of the Essence of God.

1.2.3.23.3. II. Article. Of the Divine Attributes in God.

1.2.3.23.4. III. Article Of the Holy Trinity.

1.2.3.23.5. IV. Article Of the Divine Nature, or Godhead of Christ.

1.2.3.23.6. V. Article. Of the Second Person in the Holy Trinity, taking our Flesh.

1.2.3.23.7. VI. Article. Of the Union of the two Natures in Christ.

1.2.3.23.8. VII. Article. Of the Communication of Properties.

1.2.3.23.9. VIII. Article. Of the Holy Spirit.

1.2.3.23.10. IX. Article. Of Predestination and Election.

1.2.3.23.11. X. Article. Of Preterition, or Reprobation.

1.2.3.23.12. XI. Article. Of Creation.

1.2.3.23.13. XII. Article. Of Divine Providence.

1.2.3.23.14. XIII. Article. Of the First Covenant.

1.2.3.23.15. XIV. Article. Of the Fall of Man, of his Sin, and of the Punishment thereof.

1.2.3.23.16. XV. Article. Of Original (or Birth) Sin.

1.2.3.23.17. XVI. Article. Of the New Covenant of Grace.

1.2.3.23.18. XVII. Article. Of Christ and his Mediatorial Office.

1.2.3.23.19. XVIII. Article. Of Christ Dying for all Mankind.

1.2.3.23.20. XIX. Article. Of the Agreement between the Old and New Testament.

1.2.3.23.21. XX. Article. Of Free-will in Man.

1.2.3.23.22. XXI. Article. Of Vocation and Effectual Calling.

1.2.3.23.23. XXII. Article. Of Angelical Repentance.

1.2.3.23.24. XXIII. Article. Of Justifying, or Saving Faith.

1.2.3.23.25. XXIV. Article. Of Justification by Christ.

1.2.3.23.26. XXV. Article. Of Reconciliation and Sonship by Christ.

1.2.3.23.27. XXVI. Article. Of Sanctification, and good Works.

1.2.3.23.28. XXVII. Article. Of Baptism, and the Lord’s Supper.

1.2.3.23.29. XXVIII. Article. Of the right Subject and Administration of Holy Baptism.

1.2.3.23.30. XXIX. Article. Of the Invisible Catholick Church of Christ.

1.2.3.23.31. XXX. Article. Of the Catholick Church as Visible.

1.2.3.23.32. XXXI. Article. Of Officers in the Church of Christ.

1.2.3.23.33. XXXII. Article. Of Prayer, with Laying on of Hands.

1.2.3.23.34. XXXIII. Article. Of the end and right Administration of the Lord’s Supper.

1.2.3.23.35. XXXIV. Article. Of the Discipline and Government of the Church of Christ.

1.2.3.23.36. XXXV. Article. Of Communion of Saints, and giving to the Poor.

1.2.3.23.37. XXXVI. Article. Of Perseverance.

1.2.3.23.38. XXXVII. Article. Of the Sacred Scripture.

1.2.3.23.39. XXXVIII. Article. Of the Three Creeds.

1.2.3.23.40. XXXIX. Article. Of General Councils, or Assemblies.

1.2.3.23.41. XL. Article. Of Religious Worship, and the Sabbath-Day.

1.2.3.23.42. XLI. Article. Of publick and private Prayer.

1.2.3.23.43. XLII. Article. Of publick Humiliation, by Fasting and Prayer.

1.2.3.23.44. XLIII. Article. Of Family, or Relative Duties therein.

1.2.3.23.45. XLIV. Article. Of Children dying in Infancy.

1.2.3.23.46. XLV. Article. Of the Civil Magistrate.

1.2.3.23.47. XLVI. Article. Of Liberty of Conscience.

1.2.3.23.48. XLVII. Article. Of Marriage.

1.2.3.23.49. XLVIII. Article. Of the Lawfulness of an Oath.

1.2.3.23.50. XLIX. Article. Of the State of Man after Death, and of the Resurrection of the Dead.

1.2.3.23.51. L. Article. Of the last Judgment.

1.2.3.24. The New Hampshire Confession of Faith (1833)

1.2.3.24.1. baptiststudiesonline.com > Wp-content > Uploads > 2007 > 02 > The-new-hampshire-confession-of-faith

1.2.3.24.2. I. Of the Scriptures

1.2.3.24.3. II. Of the True God

1.2.3.24.4. III. Of the Fall of Man

1.2.3.24.5. IV. Of the Way of Salvation

1.2.3.24.6. V. Of Justification

1.2.3.24.7. VI. Of the Freeness of Salvation

1.2.3.24.8. VII. Of Grace in Regeneration

1.2.3.24.9. VIII. Of Repentance and Faith

1.2.3.24.10. IX. Of God’s Purpose of Grace

1.2.3.24.11. X. Of Sanctification

1.2.3.24.12. XI. Of Perseverance of the Saints

1.2.3.24.13. XII. Of the Harmony of the Law and the Gospel

1.2.3.24.14. XIII. Of a Gospel Church

1.2.3.24.15. XIV. Of Baptism and the Lord’s Supper

1.2.3.24.16. XV. Of the Christian Sabbath

1.2.3.24.17. XVI. Of the Civil Government

1.2.3.24.18. XVII. Of the Righteous and the Wicked

1.2.3.24.19. XVIII. Of the World to Come

1.2.3.24.20. NOTE: No mention of the Family.

1.2.3.25. The Abstract of Principles (1859)

1.2.3.25.1. baptiststudiesonline.com > Wp-content > Uploads > 2007 > 02 > The-abstract-of-principles

1.2.3.25.2. I. The Scriptures.

1.2.3.25.3. II. God.

1.2.3.25.4. III. The Trinity.

1.2.3.25.5. IV. Providence.

1.2.3.25.6. V. Election.

1.2.3.25.7. VI. The Fall of Man.

1.2.3.25.8. VII. The Mediator.

1.2.3.25.9. VIII. Regeneration.

1.2.3.25.10. IX. Repentance.

1.2.3.25.11. X. Faith.

1.2.3.25.12. XI. Justification.

1.2.3.25.13. XII. Sanctification.

1.2.3.25.14. XIII. Perseverance of the Saints.

1.2.3.25.15. XIV. The Church.

1.2.3.25.16. XV. Baptism.

1.2.3.25.17. XVI. The Lord's Supper.

1.2.3.25.18. XVII. The Lord's Day.

1.2.3.25.19. XVIII. Liberty of Conscience.

1.2.3.25.20. XIX. The Resurrection.

1.2.3.25.21. XX. The Judgment.

1.2.3.26. Baptist Faith and Message (2000)

1.2.3.26.1. baptiststudiesonline.com > Wp-content > Uploads > 2007 > 02 > Baptist-faith-message-2000

1.2.3.26.2. I. The Scriptures

1.2.3.26.3. II. God

1.2.3.26.4. III. Man

1.2.3.26.5. IV. Salvation

1.2.3.26.6. V. God's Purpose of Grace

1.2.3.26.7. VI. The Church

1.2.3.26.8. VII. Baptism and the Lord's Supper

1.2.3.26.9. VIII. The Lord's Day

1.2.3.26.10. IX. The Kingdom

1.2.3.26.11. X. Last Things

1.2.3.26.12. XI. Evangelism and Missions

1.2.3.26.13. XII. Education

1.2.3.26.14. XIII. Stewardship

1.2.3.26.15. XIV. Cooperation

1.2.3.26.16. XV. The Christian and the Social Order

1.2.3.26.17. XVI. Peace and War

1.2.3.26.18. XVII. Religious Liberty

1.2.3.26.19. XVIII. The Family

1.2.3.26.20. NOTE: ALL OF THESE CONFESSIONS OF FAITH ARE CONTEXTUAL. THEY EMPHASIZE THE THEOLOGICAL CONCERNS OF THEIR DAY (AND SOCIAL CONCERNS)

1.2.3.27. Mark Dever, Polity

1.2.3.27.1. I. Introductory Essays

1.2.3.27.2. II. Historical Reprints

1.2.3.28. Hammett, Biblical Foundations for Baptist Churches

1.2.3.28.1. PART 2: WHO IS THE CHURCH

1.2.3.29. Mark Dever & Paul Alexander, The Deliberate Church

1.2.3.29.1. SECTION 1--GATHERING THE CHURCH

1.2.3.29.2. SECTION 2--WHEN THE CHURCH GATHERS

1.2.3.30. Elazar, Daniel J. Covenant & Polity in Biblical Israel

1.2.3.30.1. INTRODUCTION

1.2.3.30.2. PART I--THE IDEA

1.2.3.30.3. PART II--TORAH: COVENANTAL THINKING

1.2.3.30.4. PART III--THE CLASSIC BIBLICAL UTOPIA

1.2.3.30.5. PART IV--THE ALTERNATIVE MODEL

1.2.3.30.6. PART V--THE POSTBIBLICAL TRADITION

1.2.4. Handouts

1.2.5. Study Guides

1.2.6. Paper

1.2.6.1. I. INTRODUCTION

1.2.6.1.1. THE WORK OF POLITICAL THEOLOGY: "The work of political theology is to shed light from the Christian faith upon the intricate challenge of thinking about living in late-modern Western society." (x)

1.2.6.1.2. Political theology is not a-political theology, it is also not the whole of theology. It is on the horizon of theology.

1.2.6.1.3. Church is "counter political" and "post political." Political theology is "pure social theory"

1.2.6.1.4. POLITICAL THEOLOGY & ECCLESIOLOGY: "Political theology, rather, is an intellectual enquiry located on the horion of the theology of the church. Every aspect of theology is a pursuit of the church; but theology also has a self-descriptive moment when it speaks about the church, 'ecclesiology.' The self-descriptive moment then leads out to a missionary horizon, where the church encounters the 'other' that is summoned into the church, the world that God is redeeming. It is on this missionary horizon that political theology arises. Political theology is not ecclesial self-description directly, but a description of the world as it appears on this horizon, prepared for the church's mission by the Holy Spirit that runs ahead of the church." (239)

1.2.6.1.5. TRINITARIAN SHAPE OF POLITICAL THEOLOGY: "As ecclesiology belongs within the doctrine of the Holy Spirit, so does political theology; but since the Holy Spirit always attests the Father and the Son, so political theology, too, properly has a trinitarian shape. That is the reason for setting its content out, as we have done in the three parts of this work, as judgment, representation, and communication." (239)

1.2.6.1.6. SUMMARY OF TRINITARIAN SHAPE: "Under each of these considerations the world is seen from the church's horizon as vis-a-vis to the church. In the first place we speak of the God-given right of judgment within the world, and of the church's deference to that right, not usurping the privileged sphere of secular judgment. In the second place we speak of the God-given representative of mankind, and of the church's challenge to all other political representations. And in the third place we speak of the eschatological summons to social communication, and of the church's modeling of communication as life beyond judgment." (240)

1.2.6.1.7. Thesis: "Post-political" "pure social theory". O'Donovan rejects the traditional Three/Four Orders: Church, State, Family. Argues it is problematic because it places Church alongside the others. Instead, he develops concept of communication and place. In last year's paper comparing O'Donovan's Judgement/Representation/Communication framework with Luther (structuring his thought within those three categories), specifically focusing on Luther's contribution to this "communication" domain via traditional Protestantism's threefold orders. I argued in favor of the threefold Orders, and saw Luther's doctrines of Threefold Orders, Two Kingdoms, and Stations/Vocations as a helpful progression of a stream of Church/State thought seen in Augustine and others. Where Luther and others advocate for the Three Orders as a description of what O'Donovan terms "communication," O'Donovan rejects this in favor of his doctrine of "place." Both are helpful, but they also have their faults. I critiqued O'Donovan on rejecting the threefold orders, and while I find them helpful, I can critique Luther on another problem raised by O'Donovan. In addition to objecting to the threefold orders, O'Donovan argues that it produces a problem regarding the particularity and unviersality of those institutions. In other words, the problem is that it tends to view the order as universal, which is dangerously idealistic, or it tends to isolate it to a particularity, ignoring the universal aspects. Why I think this is a valid cricism of Luther and others is because of ecclesiological problems. This paper desires to continue this interaction with O'Donovan, and while upholding the Threefold orders, and using some of O'donovan's helpful observations on the relationship between ecclesiology and political theology ("post political" "pure social theory"), I think a contribution can be advanced against the weaknesses and criticisms of both via a Baptist ecclesiological perspective. Before I get more into that, some background info on O'Donovan's motivation for his work: O'Donovan is concerned that modern political theology ignores the rich history of political theology (From Irenaeus to Grotius). I agree. Most of the field of political theology is saturated with liberal and post-liberal thinkers, with the majority seeming to belong to liberation type movements. While they sometimes discover political theology in a thinker (exp: Boff & St. Francis), they fail to appreciate the whole sweeping history of political theology and its numerous rich contributions. I agree, and due in part of this I am motivated in this paper to continue arguing in favor of those threefold orders of protestantism, given O'Donovan's description of political theology and ecclesiology, and the tools he has equipt me with. In addition to the absence of people using these sources, there is an absence of evangelical conservative baptists making contributions to the field of political theology. Researching reviews of O'Donovan's The Ways of Judgment, I didn't find any evangelical conservative baptist voices. With this in mind, I think a Baptist perspective on the Three Orders can help alleviate the tensions/problems in O'Donovan and Luther. This baptist perspective can develop off of the historical political theological perspective on Church/Family/Stat (Augustine, Luther, Calvin, Baptist Statement of Faith), as well as O'Donovan's approach towards ecclesiology and political theology. So where do I see the corrective and contribution? It is specifically within the "communication" space, from the perspective of the parenthetical position of the church as "post political" (revealing the final form of human society). With this perspective, I think the Threefold Orders make sense, and a baptist ecclesiological perspective provides the solution to O'Donovan's problem of particularity and universality. With a baptist perspective in mind, we can speak of the Church, the State, and the Family (universal), as well as churches, states, and families (particularities).

1.2.6.1.8. Problems to Address: Baptist perspectives on the locality and universality of the church. The question of "mission" and the church. O'Donovan's particularity versus universality problem. Constitutionalism as it relates to ecclesiology.

1.2.6.2. II. OUTLINE

1.2.6.3. III. BODY

1.2.6.3.1. Sin and the reasons for states, churches, and families.

1.2.6.3.2. Contract vs. Covenant (2 parties, versus 3 parties)

1.2.6.4. IV. SUMMARY

1.2.6.5. V. CONCLUSION

1.2.6.6. SOURCES

1.2.6.6.1. Hannah Arendt, The Human Condition, Garden City, NY: Doubleday, 1959, pp 38-49

1.2.6.6.2. Gordon, Scott. Controlling the State.

1.2.6.6.3. Fitch, David. The End of Evangelicalism?

1.3. THE9500: SEMINAR IN THEOLOGICAL METHODS

1.3.1. THE9500: Seminar on Theological Methods

1.3.2. Notes

1.3.3. Readings

1.3.3.1. Allen, Paul L. Theological Method: A Guide for the Perplexed

1.3.3.1.1. OUTLINE

1.3.3.2. Lints, The Fabric of Theology

1.3.3.2.1. PART I THEOLOGY: TEXTS AND CONTEXTS

1.3.3.2.2. PART II THEOLOGY: PAST AND PRESENT

1.3.3.2.3. PART III THEOLOGY: FRAMEWORKS AND VISIONS

1.3.3.3. Clark, David. To Know and Love God.

1.3.3.3.1. OUTLINE

1.3.3.3.2. SUMMARY

1.3.3.3.3. KEY TERMS

1.3.3.3.4. CRITIQUE

1.3.3.3.5. QUOTES

1.3.3.3.6. QUESTIONS

1.3.3.3.7. Jesus teaches, then acts. Parallel with scientia sapientia?

1.3.3.4. Schleiermacher, The Christian Faith

1.3.3.4.1. OUTLINE

1.3.3.5. Horton, The Christian Faith

1.3.3.5.1. OUTLINE

1.3.3.6. Grudem, Systematic Theology

1.3.3.6.1. OUTLINE

1.3.3.7. Geisler, Systematic Theology

1.3.3.7.1. PART ONE: INTRODUCTION [PROLEGOMENA]

1.3.3.7.2. PART TWO: BIBLE [BIBLIOLOGY]

1.3.3.7.3. PART THREE: GOD (THEOLOGY PROPER)

1.3.3.7.4. PART FOUR: CREATION

1.3.3.7.5. PART FIVE: HUMANITY AND SIN [ANTHROPOLOGY AND HAMARTIOLOGY]

1.3.3.7.6. PART SIX: SALVATION [SOTERIOLOGY]

1.3.3.7.7. PART SEVEN: THE CHURCH [ECCLESIOLOGY]

1.3.3.7.8. PART EIGHT: LAST THINGS [ESCHATOLOGY]

1.3.3.8. Barth, Church Dogmatics III.1

1.3.3.8.1. 2. CREATION AS THE EXTERNAL BASIS OF THE COVENANT

1.3.4. Handouts

1.3.5. Study Guides

1.3.6. Paper