Types of Assessments

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Types of Assessments by Mind Map: Types of Assessments

1. Diagnostic

1.1. Definition

1.1.1. Also known as pre-teaching; Can be used to obtain prior student knowledge before beginning an activity. Assessments involve gathering and evaluating information from data using students’ knowledge and skills in a given learning area. This data helps teachers know when to adjust their strategies for better student outcomes

1.2. Advantage

1.2.1. Give good insight to teachers so that they can provide what the student needs, and provides motivation for the student going into the lesson.

1.3. Disadvantage

1.3.1. May not be the most accurate reflection of what the student knows.

1.4. Assessment Design

1.4.1. ‘For Learning’ design because it supports student learning during the process.

1.5. 2nd Grade Example

1.5.1. Prior to beginning a guided reading lesson build on prior knowledge before introducing the book. Ask students questions and introduce vocabulary connected to the text prior to the lesson.

2. Summative

2.1. Definition

2.1.1. Evaluation of student learning and achievement at the end of a lesson or teaching cycle; could be results or permanent scores in a student’s academic record.

2.2. Advantage

2.2.1. Motivation for students to study and prepare for assessments. They may make students want to learn especially in the upper grades.

2.3. Disadvantage

2.3.1. Teachers could be accused of “teaching to the test” placing added pressure on the entire learning environment. Even students with excellent knowledge of material could not perform well on these assessments for a number of reasons.

2.4. Assessment Design

2.4.1. ‘Of Learning’, students are held accountable for their learning; determine how much learning has taken place. Learner Outcomes.

2.5. 2nd Grade Example

2.5.1. End of unit reading lesson with students writing a one-page book report with a drawing to support their evidence. Students will present their final projects to the class giving them rehearsal time with engaging one another.

3. High-Stakes Assessments

3.1. Definition

3.1.1. These assessments are used to determine advancement, promotion to the next grade; pass/fail tests.

3.2. Advantage

3.2.1. Motivation for students to study and prepare for assessments. They may make students want to learn especially in the upper grades.

3.3. Disadvantage

3.3.1. Test may not accurately measure a student’s knowledge or skills. Tests can cause stress for some students.

3.4. Assessment Design

3.4.1. ‘Of Learning’, students are held accountable for their learning; determine how much learning has taken place. Learner Outcomes.

3.5. 2nd Grade Example

3.5.1. Students will be assessed using non-sense words for fluency. The number of words that are sounded out correctly over the total number used for testing.

4. Formative

4.1. Definition

4.1.1. Formal and informal assessments given over a period of time, giving teachers the opportunity to modify activities for better student outcomes.

4.2. Advantage

4.2.1. Teachers can decide what activities will produce the best learning environment. Students are more engaged in learning even taking responsibility of their learning.

4.3. Disadvantage

4.3.1. Teachers concerned about these assessments being too time consuming and making them feel rushed to get through the lessons.

4.4. Assessment Design

4.4.1. ‘For Learning’ design because it supports student learning during the process.

4.5. 2nd Grade Example

4.5.1. Closing a shared reading lesson students are given an “exit ticket” to ensure connections to text.

5. Performance Based Assessments

5.1. Definition

5.1.1. Assessments where students will perform a task rather than select answers from a test. Students may be asked to explain an event or math problem. Teachers will utilize a scoring system to assess the work, such as a rubric.

5.2. Advantage

5.2.1. Students are engaged in a rich learning environment and become familiar with a rubric grading system.

5.3. Disadvantage

5.3.1. Teachers utilizing the scoring system correctly; they need to accurately score students work.

5.4. Assessment Design

5.4.1. ‘For Learning’ design because it supports student learning during the process

5.5. 2nd Grade Example

5.5.1. Have students plan a birthday party for a friend. They will brainstorm ideas using a web model. They will then write out a draft and review and them complete a final draft. Teacher will use a rubric with a 0-3 scoring system to grade.

6. Portfolio Assessments

6.1. Definition

6.1.1. Documents student learning through a series of student developed artifacts. Collection of student work that provides evidence in relation to the instructional goal. Students have the opportunity to make decisions about their work and goal setting.

6.2. Advantage

6.2.1. Gives both teachers and students an organized space to document, review, and analyze content learning. Can promote a dialogue between student and teacher.

6.3. Disadvantage

6.3.1. Can be very demanding for students, parents, and teachers. Require dedication of goal setting and extra planning time. Portfolios are personal to each student and contents will vary between students leaving the question if grading was performed objectively

6.4. Assessment Design

6.4.1. ‘For Learning’ design because it supports student learning during the process; student accomplishments over time. Also ‘Of Learning’ because students are required to articulate and review parts of their portfolio—comprehensive.

6.5. 2nd Grade Example

6.5.1. ESL Students will develop an “All About Me” passport portfolio. They will begin with basic information Name, Address, and family. The will progress through the year adding in culture traditions, favorite things, and future goals.

7. Authentic Assessments

7.1. Definition

7.1.1. Various assessment techniques such as performance, portfolio, or even projects; elicits complex academic performance from students. Students perform real-world tasks demonstrating meaningful learning.

7.2. Advantage

7.2.1. Teachers can decide what activities will produce the best learning environment. Student are more engaged in learning even taking responsibility of their learning.

7.3. Disadvantage

7.3.1. Teachers concerned about these assessments being too time consuming and making them feel rushed to get through the lessons.

7.4. Assessment Design

7.4.1. ‘For Learning’ design because it supports student learning during the process.

7.5. 2nd Grade Example

7.5.1. After a shared reading assignment students will write a letter to their favorite character in the chosen story introducing themselves and telling them what their favorite part was.

8. Self-Assessment

8.1. Definition

8.1.1. Students monitor and evaluate the quality of their own learning; students will judge their own work in order to improve their learning.

8.2. Definition

8.2.1. Helps students to understand how they learn and identify learning strategies from their learning styles, also, students can identify strategies to help them learn the vocabulary in written and spoken language.

8.3. Disadvantage

8.3.1. May not be suitable for all students, lack of readiness for self-assessment by some students. It also implies knowledge regarding language and learning that some second language learners may not have.

8.4. Assessment Design

8.4.1. ‘For Learning’ design because it supports student learning during the process.

8.5. 2nd Grade Example

8.5.1. Students will be provided with a read and asked to write about 3 of the story elements; students will then be provided and editing checklist to assess the work they have done.

9. Peer Assessment

9.1. Definition

9.1.1. Process through which teachers and students share in the evaluation of learning; it is used as a tool to empower learning for students.

9.2. Advantage

9.2.1. Peer assessments evaluations are recommendations only; the teacher has the final say on the grade.

9.3. Disadvantage

9.3.1. Lack of maturity from students for reviewing peer work. If students agree to assign one another high marks.

9.4. Assessment Design

9.4.1. ‘For Learning’ design because it supports student learning during the process

9.5. 2nd Grade Example

9.5.1. Students will be provided with a read and asked to write about 3 of the story elements; students will then be exchange work with an assigned partner and review and assess their peers work.

10. References

10.1. Links

10.1.1. http://education.cu-portland.edu/blog/teaching-strategies/summative-assessment-what-teachers-need-to-know/ http://everydaylife.globalpost.com/advantages-disadvantages-formative-assessment-28407.html http://everydaylife.globalpost.com/advantages-disadvantages-formative-assessment-28407.html http://education.cu-portland.edu/blog/teaching-strategies/summative-assessment-what-teachers-need-to-know/ http://www.ascd.org/publications/books/196021/chapters/What_is_Performance-Based_Learning_and_Assessment,_and_Why_is_it_Important%C2%A2.aspx http://www.education.com/reference/article/high-stakes-testing1/ http://www.teach-nology.com/litined/assessment/alternative/portfolios/ http://www.brighthubeducation.com/student-assessment-tools/103531-types-of-authentic-assessment/ http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ815370.pdf http://learningtoassess.blogspot.com/2010/12/advantages-and-disadvantages-of-self.html http://learningsciences.utexas.edu/teaching/assess-learning/feedback/peer-assessment http://serc.carleton.edu/NAGTWorkshops/assess/peerreview.html