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1.1. [Module 1] - PLAN YOUR DIRECTION

1.1.1. How much money can I earn?

1.1.1.1. The amount of you money you can make will depend on a variety of factors, including ; location, type of institution you work in, the type of qualifications you have and the type of experience you have. At the high end of the spectrum you could make up to $5,000 per month in countries like China and the Middle East and the lower end at around $1,000 per countries (as a starting salary) in other, less developed countries

1.1.2. What places can I work and live?

1.1.2.1. Persuing a career in teaching English can allow you to work in most countries around the world. As your progress in terms of the experience and qualifications you get, the moor doors will be open to you, both in terms of location flexibility as well as earning potential and career development opportunities.

1.1.2.2. To put it simply, having a few qualifications behind you will enable you to work and life very well anywhere in the world. Although even without the full range of qualifications you will still be able to work in a wide range of locations across the world

1.1.3. What will my lifestyle be like?

1.1.3.1. Taking into account the low cost of living in many countries abroad when compared to countries such as USA and UK, as well as being able to earn well in many countries abroad, not to mention increased earning potential with the more experience you have as well as career development, being involved in English teaching abroad can provide you a very comfortable lifestyle financially. .

1.1.3.2. Moreover, the experiences you will have, the fun, adventurous things you will be able to do, all of the different people you will meet, new cultures to explore and venture into, can give you an extremely rewarding, fun and enjoyable lifestyle.

1.1.3.3. In fact, so many people have such a fantastic lifestyle following this industry abroad, that many end up permenently abroad and never come back because they like it so much. Often leaving professional careers in thier home country and keep enjoying their time abroad.

1.1.3.4. Not only earning a good wage and enjoying great experiences abroad, but the work itself can be very rewarding and enjoyable

1.1.4. Where can it take me in the future?

1.1.4.1. Entering this field can lead you to whole range of interesting, professional and often lucrative careers, be that abroad or even back in your home country. From senior teaching positions, director of studies, teacher trainers, managers, course designers, coursebook creators, the list goes on. If you wanted to simply travel for a while that's fine, but you could also follow some very well respected and well paid avenues as your experience progresses

1.1.5. What kind of schools can I work in?

1.1.5.1. Teaching English abroad can lead you to teach in a wide variety of places. Language schools, language centers, universities, international schools, high schools and primary schools, business and company headquarters are all examples of some of the places you can find work in (more in this is subsequent sections)

1.1.6. What type of people will I meet?

1.1.6.1. Teaching English is a fantastic opportunity to not only make some really good, life long friendships as well as some really cool and interesting people to have fun and spend time exploring with. Moreover when teaching English abroad will give you the opportunity to meet people who you would never have otherwise met before in your home country, meeting people and making friends all over the world and from every walk of life. .

1.1.6.2. Some of the sweetest people you'll ever meet will be the students you teach, who you will inevitably connect with and even form friendships with. We will explore good ways where you can meet people both locals and foreigners when abroad in later sections of this course

1.1.7. How can it help me grow as a person?

1.1.7.1. Absolutely. Teaching English, especially abroad, is not only a great way to pick up some really valuable teaching skills that will help you grow as a teacher and deliver great value to your students and really help to improve their lives. Moreover, it really can help you grow so much as person. It can really develop your social, and conversation skills, give you confidence in speaking and clearly communicating to larger groups of people, which will improve your public speaking skills.

1.1.7.2. Experiencing new cultures, new ways of life and thinking can really help to broaden your mind, and provide you with insights and world views that you would never have otherwise had. Overcoming the challenges (which will be alot less as a result of you going through this course) and obstacles of learning a new skill set and living abroad will really stretch you as a person, and make you a lot wiser and worldly as a result.

1.1.7.3. You will find that after a while teaching English and living abroad, you won't be the same person you were when you come back, in a good way!

1.1.8. What type of experiences will I have?

1.1.8.1. Meeting really interesting people, making life long friends, traveling to places you would never have even imagined going, having amazing, culturally rich experiences, learning so much more about people from different countries, super cool and interesting weekends away, going to fun parties and events, learning new languages, meeting eventual life partners are just some of the amazing experiences teaching English abroad can give you. We will go through these in specific details regarding particular countries later on in the course. The short answer being you are about to embark on a super amazing adventure, a journey of self discovery and life experience that you will always value and cherish.

1.1.9. Will I enjoy teaching abroad?

1.1.9.1. This all comes down to how well you prepare for it. The purpose of this academy is to prepare you so well that you begin loving your experience straight away from day one! The vast, VAST majority of people who teach English abroad absolutely love it, and it turns out to be even better than they had originally expected. So much so that many people often completely focus on this as a career and often end up permanently living abroad. For others, especially the less prepared and experienced face struggles and challenges when teaching English abroad. From initial culture shocks (which we cover later) to settling in to the new environment (which we also cover), to getting through the initial learning curves of teaching English and the various challenges that come from that (which we also cover later) . As a result of not being prepared for this a proportion of people do not enjoy as much as they would have in the beginning, simply because they are going it alone and are overcoming the inevitable challenges themselves. The first few months are quite stressful for them, and then, the longer they stay there they enjoy it more and more. The purpose of this academy is to provide you with EVERYTHING that you need to know about both teaching English and relocating to prepare you THOROUGHLY. In fact, by them time you go through everything here, you will be more prepared than many teachers with several years experience and who have been living in your chosen country for a long time! To put it simply, yes, you will absolutely love teaching English and especially lviing abroad, even more so as a result of being a part of this academy,

1.1.10. How can it help my life be like when I return home?

1.1.10.1. Firstly, having experience living and working abroad will really strengthen and look great on your CV, not to mention being proficient in another language will look great too and could open doors for you in terms of employment. Teaching is a respected profession, having relevant teaching experience beings with it a whole range of skill sets that employers find desirable.

1.1.10.2. Furthermore the ESL industry is also huge in English speaking countries too, which means that you will have a whole new career pathway available to you when you return home. You could either choose to follow this career pathway to higher levels and get paid very well for it (more on this in module 3), or you can have the peace of mind knowing that you will always have teaching jobs available to you to either supplement your income further, or as a backup in case of an emergency.

1.1.10.3. One of the most appealing things about establishing a career for yourself in the ESL industry, is that it gives you both peace of mind and essentially makes you recession proof. Peace of mind in the sense that in the back of your mind you will know that if ever you were not content with your current situation, you could pack up, leave and get paid well anywhere in the world within a very short space of time. Recession proof in that there are literally THOUSANDS of positions available across the world, including your home country at any given time. in the English teaching field.

1.1.11. Will it give me security for the future?

1.1.11.1. Gaining relevant experience in the ESL field can not only give you job security, due the high demand of English teachers, but many companies exist that offer pension schemes too (e.g. British council)

1.1.12. Is it a proper job or career?

1.1.12.1. Contrary to popular belief, teaching English can not only pay well and offer great benefits and perks, but is also an industry that can allow you to carve out a very professional career for yourself. While the industry does attract students and backpackers who simply want to travel for longer, there is also another, professional, long-term career side to it too. Many highly educated people who already have excellent careers and options, move to this industry for many different reasons.

1.1.12.2. As you'll see in module 3, as you progress through this course and learn more about this industry, ESL can be a real, 'proper', professional, respectable career that you will not only thoroughly enjoy but that you can feel proud of and commit yourself to.

1.1.13. What type of freedom can it give me?

1.1.13.1. The freedom to live anywhere in the world, whenever you want. The freedom of never being tied down to one job or career for the rest of your life. The freedom of peace of mind and security in knowing that you will always have job options available to you. The freedom of working from home and spending more time with your family The freedom of choosing to supplement your income from your current job any time you wanted

1.1.14. Am I capable of doing it?

1.1.14.1. Teaching English to a high standard will require the acquisition of a lot of new skills, techniques and strategies. With experience alone, it can take years to reach a high level of English teaching that both you and your students enjoy, Additionally living abroad brings with a range of challenges and obstacles too.

1.1.14.2. Being part of this academy will help you to cut years off this process, and fast track your progress, not only preparing you for teaching English both online and offline as well as living abroad (if you choose to do that), but positioning you in a place whereby both you enjoy what you do, and it becomes a thoroughly rewarding and fin experience right from the start

1.1.14.3. If you can read, write and speak English then you can certainly do this, regardless of your age, experience or educational background. As you'll soon see, with the right information available to you, you will see how this can be possible in a short space of time.

1.1.15. How long does it take to become qualified?

1.1.15.1. This really depends on your intentions and which avenues you wish to persue. Module 2 will go through this in significant depth, so you will have a good understanding on what path you wish to take in terms of qualifications and employment

1.1.16. How soon can I begin? /

1.1.16.1. While it's possible to begin straight away or even in as little as a month, it really depends on your intentions. As you go through the modules in the academy, you will get a clear understanding on all the ins and outs in terms of qualifications, employment and relocating. This will help you to get a really clear picture in terms of how soon you wish to begin.

1.1.17. Can I afford to move abroad?/ What if I don't have any money?

1.1.17.1. Modules 4 and 7 provide specific country profiles and case studies which will help give you a clear understanding in terms of how much you need to prepare financially. If you are itching to leave and experience life abroad as soon as possible, even with very little backup money it;;s very possible. The key is preparation, planning and being fully informed before you leave. By the time you go through these modules you will have confidence in knowing exactly what;s available to you concerning your particular financial situation .

1.1.18. Is it safe to live abroad? Are the jobs scams? Is it safe for females?

1.1.18.1. ....

1.1.18.1.1. Living abroad can be a daunting experience, with very real risks and legitimate concerns. , That being said, the bottom line is YES, but it;'s wise to do your due diligence and take call the right precautions before you leave. Peace of mind is a wonderful thing. Knowing that you are as prepared and equipped as possible to relocate will make for a much more relaxing and enjoyable experience. Module 7 is designed to provide you with as much information as possible for you to ensure you know and have everything you need in order to stay as safe as possible

1.1.19. Is the work enjoyable or is it difficult and tiring?

1.1.19.1. There are really two sides to this coin. Teaching English, especially if you go abroad can be one of the most enjoyable and thoroughly rewarding experiences of your life that you will love doing and will cherish the memories of forever. Even if you weren't fully prepared and simply jumped in at the deep end, it could be a fun and exciting adventure for you.

1.1.19.2. The other side of the coin is that it becomes a living nightmare. Things go wrong, things weren't as you expected, challenges arise and it becomes a living nightmare. The good news is that all of this can be avoided with the right preparation and knowledge before hand, both in terms of teaching skills and living abroad.

1.1.19.3. Going through the various modules with thoroughly prepare you in advance, Your teaching will be on point, and you'll know exactly what to expect both in terms of teaching, working and living. You can begin to enjoy the work and experience as soon as you begin.

1.1.20. Will I have time to actually travel?

1.1.20.1. While some job posts give you more time off than others, such as high schools, international schools and universities which can give EXTREMELY generous allowances in terms of holidays and time off, compared to language schools Regardless, teaching English abroad provides you with the perfect opportunity to take both long and short trips to places that wouldn't have even crossed your mind or that you wouldn't have had the opportunity to visit before. Be that to neighboring countries and countries a relatively short distance away, to even provinces, cities and small, hidden gems off the beaten path in your host country. Teaching English abroad will give you the privilege of venturing to all of these really cool places that you would never have even known about or otherwise visited if you were back in your home country.

1.1.21. Who will I teach? What are the students like?

1.1.21.1. English language students come from all different walks of life, places age ranges and backgrounds. From super suave, successful European business men to sweet, charming old ladies in Thailand. People learn English for a whole host of reasons. From preparing university placement exams, to relocating abroad, to dealing with customers in their own business, the reasons are vast A great aspect of this field is the broad range of people you get to meet, interact and form friendships with from all over the world.

1.1.21.2. You get to meet people who you would never have otherwise met before. In fact some of the best friends you will ever make will be some of the students that you will have the privileged of working with and knowing. The students can be one of the BEST parts of teaching English. Some of the sweetest, endearing people you'll ever meet. You can also learn ALOT from them as well as them learning from you. It really can be a mutual exchange. Certainly a reciprocal relationship in many respects

1.1.22. What if I don't have confidence or I feel scared to teach and travel?

1.1.23. Will I have support when I'm there? Or will I be alone?

1.1.23.1. A wide range of support systems exist for foreigners abroad. From embassies and consulates, to expatriate communities, the friendly, kind and helpful locals you meet who would do anything for you, to the staff and management at your places of work, colleagues and from the close friends you end up forming either abroad,

1.1.23.2. Module 7 of the academy aims to provide you with as much information as possible before you relocated, so you will fully aware of and have access to various support networks once you arrive. Even accessing and preparing for them before you leave your home country. Preparing thoroughly in this respect will really provide you with the security, assurance and peace of mind you need to know that you will be safe and have access to solid, helpful support after you relocate

1.1.24. Various components of lexis

1.2. [Module - 2] QUALIFICATIONS

1.2.1. (Section1) What is the difference between CELTA, TEFL, TESOL and EFL?

1.2.1.1. These terms are often used interchangeably. Even though they all mean different things some people use them all the same way..

1.2.1.2. TEFL (Teaching English as a Foreign Language) course: This prepares teachers to teach English in a country where English is not the primary language. For example, John from the USA goes to China to teach English.

1.2.1.3. TESL (Teaching English as a Second Language) course: This on the other hand would prepare a teacher to teach in an English speaking country to students whose first language isn’t English. For example, John from the USA stays in the USA and teaches English to students who want to learn English.

1.2.1.4. TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) course: This encompasses both TEFL and TESL and can mean either one or both. T

1.2.1.5. TESOL prepares a teacher to teach a student whose native language isn’t English. For example, our good friend John from the USA is teaching a student who didn’t learn English as their first language

1.2.1.6. You can think of TESOL as the type of product and CELTA as a specific brand. The CELTA course is the best known and some consider it the most respected of TESOL courses.

1.2.1.7. CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) course: This is a specific brand of TESOL course operating under the umbrella of Cambridge University.

1.2.1.8. CELTA is the industry standard because the quality of instruction doesn’t vary a huge amount, Cambridge is very well known, and it is generally well respected. There are other well known and respected

1.2.1.9. . There are other well known and respected TESOL courses as well (Trinity TESOL or SIT TESOL) but CELTA is by far the most internationally well known accreditation.

1.2.1.10. There are literally thousands of other TESOL courses, but because there are so many other TESOL courses there is a lot of variability in quality and price.

1.2.2. (Section 2) Non CELTA TEFL qualifications

1.2.2.1. (Section 2 - Video1) What are the limits and benefits of taking online TEFL courses?

1.2.2.1.1. Online

1.2.2.1.2. Offline

1.2.2.2. (Section 2 - Video 2) TEFL / TEFL / TESOL Certificates

1.2.2.2.1. TESOL/TEFL/TESL Some accredited by proper institutions, while others are not

1.2.2.2.2. Course length: Varies greatly some as short as a week some as long as several months but most respected TESOL courses are 100+ hours of instruction

1.2.2.2.3. Price: Also varies greatly 200 to 4,000 USD, but generally less expensive than the CELTA

1.2.2.2.4. Prerequisites: Depends completely on the school issuing the TESOL certificate

1.2.2.2.5. Course work: Varies tremendously with some courses being only easy online work to some that require hours and hours of grueling work and include practical training in a real class but as a VERY general rule of thumb the course work is usually easier than the CELTA course work

1.2.2.2.6. Quality control: Once again it is completely dependent on the school. Some are very rigorous some aren’t.

1.2.2.3. (Section 2 - Video 3) Offline Courses

1.2.2.3.1. TEFL Certificate

1.2.2.3.2. SIT TESOL Certificate

1.2.2.3.3. Trinity Certy ( Trinity Certificate in TESOL)

1.2.2.3.4. CELTA

1.2.2.3.5. Positives and Negatives of CELTA and Trinity Cert

1.2.2.3.6. Master of Education (MEd) in TESOL Master of Arts (MA) or Science (MS) in Applied Linguistics Master of Arts (MA) in English with an emphasis in TESOL Master of Arts (MA) in Teaching (MAT) in ESL

1.2.2.4. (Section 2 - Video 4) Online Courses

1.2.2.4.1. (Part 1) The different, reputable online options,

1.2.2.4.2. (Part 2) Which is the best online option

1.2.3. (Section 3) CELTA - Certificate in Language Teaching For Adults

1.2.3.1. (Section 3 - Video 1) What doors can it open for you?

1.2.3.1.1. a CELTA teaching certificate can enable you to work anywhere in the world teaching English as a foreign language.

1.2.3.1.2. Getting CELTA qualified enables you to obtain the higher paid teaching positions available and the better working conditions than other, more advanced positions in the industry (we will discuss these options later in the course)

1.2.3.1.3. Getting CELTA qualified can position you to pursue other well paid positions as you gain more experience

1.2.3.1.4. Once you gain 2-3 years relevant teaching experience, having a CELTA qualification enables you to pursue other TEFL related career paths, either at home or abroad, that pay well and offer good packages and working conditions

1.2.3.2. (Section 3 - Video 2) What career paths can it lead to?

1.2.3.2.1. English teacher Senior teacher Teacher trainer Coroporate trainer Director of studies CELTA trainer Language school/center managers - regional, national Plus others such as... coursebook creators, course designers,.. More details on these will be covered later in the course

1.2.3.3. (Section 3 - Video 3) How much is the CELTA and how to pay? And Where can I take the CELTA course?

1.2.3.3.1. Most CELTA courses require an investment of around $1,500 - $3,000 depending on the location. Courses in western countries such as UK,USA,AUS,NZ cost around

1.2.3.3.2. To take your Cambridge English exam, you will need to register directly with an authorised exam centre. There are over 2,800 centres in 130 countries around the world. .

1.2.3.3.3. All of them are inspected by Cambridge Assessment English to meet the required standards...

1.2.3.3.4. You can search for centres that offer the Cambridge English teaching qualifications below. Below is an alphabetical list by country... Find a teaching qualification centre here: Find a teaching qualification centre

1.2.3.3.5. Can you get a payment plan?

1.2.3.4. (Section 3 - Video 4) What does the CELTA course involve?

1.2.3.4.1. The course is 120 hours in total and you will receive a lot of input from your tutors on teaching methodology, lesson planning, language analysis and language skills.

1.2.3.4.2. You’ll have the opportunity to observe experienced teachers in a real life language classroom situation and learn about the different skills and techniques they use.

1.2.3.4.3. You will teach real language students throughout your course and by the end you will have had 6 hours of observed and assessed teaching practice. This practical experience is invaluable when you start your first job.

1.2.3.4.4. As well as being assessed in the classroom, you will complete four written assignments based on the input you receive

1.2.3.4.5. There is no final exam, you are assessed throughout the course; so you can learn and improve as your progress.

1.2.3.4.6. Every course is moderated by an external assessor, appointed by Cambridge English, so you will receive a certificate from Cambridge English, part of the University of Cambridge.

1.2.3.4.7. The CELTA course has the following core components to prepare you for the classroom... - Written assignments - Observation tasks - Lesson planning - Lesson types - Lesson ideas - Task Management (Details of how to set up and execute various tasks)

1.2.3.4.8. Full CELTA syllabus can be found here: http://www.cambridgeenglish.org/images/21816-celta-syllbus.pdf

1.2.3.4.9. The CELTA is made up of instruction, teaching practice and reflection and contains the following components: - input sessions on language awareness, - student awareness, - classroom management - lesson planning

1.2.3.4.10. The CELTA course includes daily, small group teaching practice with students at different language levels detailed feedback and discussion sessions with tutors, as well as observation of qualified teachers and your peers

1.2.3.4.11. The five main topics you will cover in the CELTA course are: learners and teachers, and the teaching and learning context language analysis and awareness language skills: reading, listening, speaking and writing planning and resources for different contexts developing teaching skills and professionalism

1.2.3.4.12. To receive a CELTA certificate, you need to complete the course and meet the assessment criteria for all written and practical assignments..

1.2.3.4.13. You'll be assessed on 6 hours of teaching practice and 4 written assignments

1.2.3.4.14. There are three passing grades: Pass A, Pass B and Pass.

1.2.3.4.15. While a Pass will look great on your CV, even simply getting a pass is absolutely fine. It's very rare for employers to require anything more than a Pass grade

1.2.3.5. (Section 3 - Video 5) What are the requirements to take the CELTA

1.2.3.5.1. CELTA courses are suitable for candidates with no previous teaching experience.

1.2.3.5.2. They are also taken by people who have some experience of teaching English, and people who have experience of teaching other subjects.

1.2.3.5.3. You don't need a degree to take the course, you just need to be able to speak English to a good level. As long as your level of English is high enough (CEFR high C1 / C2 level or IELTS level band 8.0), you can apply for a CELTA course.

1.2.3.5.4. Prior to being accepted on the course, you do need to take and submit a written task first and then an interview...

1.2.3.5.5. Before you are invited for interview, you will be asked to complete a written task. This will include a focus on language awareness as well as consideration of other issues related to teaching English.

1.2.3.5.6. If this written task shows that you have the appropriate level of English and the potential to develop the skills needed to pass the course, you will be invited to interview.

1.2.3.5.7. Interviews vary from centre to centre – some centres hold individual interviews; others hold group interviews.

1.2.3.5.8. In all cases, you will be asked to show how you think about language and learning/teaching English so that the interviewer can confirm that you have the potential to develop the skills needed to teach English, and meet the criteria to pass the CELTA course.

1.2.4. (Section 4) Doing the CELTA

1.2.4.1. Can you do the CELTA online?

1.2.4.1.1. You can take a large portion of the course online

1.2.4.1.2. The Cambridge CELTA Course Online is a blended learning course, combining online study with face-to-face teaching practice.

1.2.4.1.3. The Cambridge CELTA online course consists of Input sessions, where you get both practical and theoretical teaching knowledge, are delivered online with tutor support. You only need to travel to your CELTA centre for lesson planning and teaching practice.

1.2.4.1.4. The course follows the same syllabus and leads to the same internationally recognised certificate as face-to-face CELTA courses.

1.2.4.1.5. An Online CELTA trainee talks about their experiences studying https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I3i3LTjVAFg&list=PL03C75AAF56E281A4&index=3&feature=plpp_video

1.2.4.2. Can you do it alongside your job?

1.2.4.2.1. (Section 3.2.a) Part time options

1.2.4.2.2. (Section 3.2 b) Full time options

1.2.5. (Section 5) Common CELTA FAQs

1.2.5.1. How will I be assessed on the course?

1.2.5.1.1. Assessment on the course is continuous and integrated, taking into account teaching skills, the written assignments and professionalism, with each assessed component contributing to the overall grade.

1.2.5.1.2. Trainees are given feedback by the tutors on their teaching and have at least two tutorials during the course at which they discuss their progress

1.2.5.1.3. All tutors working on the course discuss each trainee's progress before deciding on the final grade.

1.2.5.1.4. You will be assessed throughout the course. There is no final examination. An external assessor, appointed by Cambridge English Language Assessment, moderates each course.

1.2.5.1.5. There are two types of assessment – Teaching Practice and Written Assignments. To get the CELTA certificate, you must pass both assessments. There are three passing grades: Pass ‘A’ Pass ‘B’ Pass

1.2.5.1.6. You will cover the topics on the course through attending seminars, observing qualified teachers, participating in teaching practice and writing four assignments.

1.2.5.1.7. 6 hours of assessed teaching practice with real EFL classes at two levels of ability

1.2.5.1.8. 4 written assignments: one focusing on adult learning; one on the language system of English; one on language skills; and one on classroom teaching. Each one is pass/fail

1.2.5.1.9. To be awarded the certificate you must pass both components the assessed teaching practice and the written assignments of which the teaching practice holds more weight

1.2.5.2. What level of English grammar is expected prior to the course

1.2.5.2.1. As a teacher of English, it is essential that you are able to provide correct models for the students.

1.2.5.2.2. You are not expected to know all the terminology at the start of your teaching career, but you are expected to have a very strong command of the language, spelling, grammar and punctuation.

1.2.5.2.3. Everything you need to know to successfully pass the CELTA and much more will be covered later in the course. By the time you take your CELTA you will be more than thoroughly prepared and well positioned to pass it

1.2.5.3. What is the application/interview procedure?

1.2.5.3.1. Candidates complete an application form, with a writing task. Once the application has been assessed candidates are then contacted for an interview.

1.2.5.3.2. Applicants are interviewed by one of the CELTA trainers to check that you understand what is involved on the course and that you have realistic expectations of the course outcomes.

1.2.5.3.3. To check and that your skills are adequate and so you will be asked questions to get an idea of how well you can explain the things you know about language and how you would interact with students.

1.2.5.3.4. The interview isn't particularly difficult, but it's important to think about your answers and to explain your answers as clearly as possible.

1.2.5.4. What is the pre-course activity?

1.2.5.4.1. The pre-course task is designed to get you up to speed on the terminology of English grammar and to help you to recognise the phonemic symbols which help your students to understand the complexities of English pronunciation.

1.2.5.4.2. You will be asked to identify tenses, parts of speech (adverbs and adjectives, for example) and vocabulary meaning, as well as phonology.

1.2.5.4.3. The pre course isn't very difficult but it's a little bit extensive. With all of the resources on this website you will be able to answer all of the questions.

1.2.5.5. How Can I Prepare myself for the CELTA?

1.2.5.5.1. You don't need to worry too much about really preparing yourself for the CELTA course.

1.2.5.5.2. We have a a whole range of resources available to you to brush up on these and learn before your course begins.

1.2.5.5.3. Although if you have never had any teaching experience and are completely new, there are 2 books, that are often suggested for trainees prior to taking the course. 1. Practical English Usage (Michael Swan) 2. Learning Teaching (Jim Scrivener)

1.2.5.5.4. The grammar / language book Practical English Usage you can just keep handy for you during the course to help you with your plans and assignments should any issues or terminology regarding grammar or language that you are unsure of arise.

1.2.5.5.5. The second book Learning Teaching by Jim Scrivener, will really help you to get a head start on all the ins and outs of teaching and give you a taste of some of the things you are going to study on the CELTA.

1.2.5.5.6. Both books are available in the resources section. However, everything has been mapped out for you on this memebership site, so all you need to do is go through the content in the fulfilment section which will show you everything you need to know and more.

1.2.5.5.7. By the time you go through the modules in this course you will be more equipped and informed than even the most experienced teachers on your course

1.2.5.5.8. Other, useful books include.. - The Ultimate Guide To CELTA (Emma Jones & Amanda Momeni - A Concise Grammar For English Teachers (Tony Penston) - The Practice of English Language Teaching (Jeremy Harmer) - How To Teach Hrammar (Scott Thornbury) - Grammar For English Teachers (Martin Parrott) - Teaching Tenses (Rosemary Aitken) - How English Works (Michael Swan and Catherine Walter) - Essential Phonetics For English Language Teachers (Tony Penston)

1.2.6. (Section 6) The next stage up from a CELTA

1.2.6.1. (Section 6 - Video 1) The DELTA

1.2.6.1.1. Delta

1.2.6.2. (Section 6 - Video 2) DELTA FAQ's

1.2.6.2.1. (Section 6.2) Common DELTA FAQs

1.3. [Module 3] CAREER PATHWAY

1.3.1. (Section 1) English Teacher

1.3.1.1. (Section 1.1) How to become an English teacher

1.3.1.1.1. This will vary from country to country and from school to school... Generally the requirements typically fall into the following categories, depending on country, institution and salary...

1.3.1.1.2. (1) MA Linguistcs / English / TEFL - Bachelors Degree English / TEFL / Education - CELTA / Trinity Cert - Relevant teaching experience - Native English Speaker

1.3.1.1.3. (2) Bachelors degree (any subject) - CELTA / Trinity Cert - Relevant teaching experience - Native English speaker

1.3.1.1.4. (3) Bachelors degree (any subject) - CELTA / Trinity Cert - Relevant teaching experience - Native English speaker or high level non native English speaker

1.3.1.1.5. (4) Bachelors degree (any subject) - CELTA / Trinity Cert - Native Speaker

1.3.1.1.6. (5) Bachelors degree (any subject) - CELTA / Trinity Cert - Native Speaker or high level non native speaker

1.3.1.1.7. (6) CELTA / Trinity Cert - Native Speaker

1.3.1.1.8. (7) CELTA / Trinity CERT - Native speaker or high level non native speaker

1.3.1.1.9. (8) Any reputable 120 hour online TEFL Cert - Relevant teaching experience - Native speaker

1.3.1.1.10. (9) Any reputable 120 hour online TEFL Cert - Native speaker

1.3.1.1.11. (10) Any reputable 120 hour online TEFL Cert - Relevant teaching experience - Native speaker or high level non native speaker

1.3.1.1.12. (11) Any reputable 120 hour online TEFL Cert - Native speaker or high level non native speaker

1.3.1.1.13. (12) Native speaker

1.3.1.1.14. (13) Native speaker or high level non native speaker

1.3.1.2. (Section 1.2) English teacher job role

1.3.1.2.1. ESL instructors create lesson plans to teach non-native speakers to read, write and speak English. They help students learn English grammar, pronunciation and conversational skills.

1.3.1.2.2. Many ESL instructors also prepare classroom and community activities in addition to arranging field trips, which allow students to learn English in real life contexts.

1.3.1.2.3. College ESL instructors develop students' abilities to read textbooks and write essays in English.

1.3.1.2.4. Most ESL instructors teach in elementary schools, high schools, public and private colleges, adult education programs, vocational schools and community education programs. Other ESL instructors work as private tutors.

1.3.1.2.5. The primary job responsibility of an ESL instructor is to improve the English reading, writing and speaking skills of students of diverse ages and backgrounds.

1.3.1.2.6. ESL instructors are generally required to tailor their lessons for students whose native languages and English-speaking abilities are varied.

1.3.1.2.7. ESL teachers may be required to teach General, Academic, Business, Conversational English depending on the school requirements.

1.3.1.2.8. Sometimes teachers will work using predesignated lesson plans, coursebooks, supplementary materials or they may need to research, find or create their own materials for lessons and lesson plans

1.3.1.2.9. Individual language schools and centers may have different systems and policies with regardds to the nature of lessons teachers deliver. In some cases lesson plans may be provided to teachers, whereby teachers are expected to deliver classes according to a pre-established procedure

1.3.1.2.10. English teacher salary

1.3.1.3. (Section 1.3) Where to find English teacher jobs?

1.3.1.3.1. Job boards

1.3.1.3.2. Contacting schools directly

1.3.1.3.3. Agencies

1.3.2. (Section 2) Senior teachers

1.3.2.1. (Section 2.1) How to become a senior teacher

1.3.2.1.1. The requirements for becoming a senior teacher vary from each language school or language center.

1.3.2.1.2. Typically, teachers will need at least minimum of 2 years teaching experience with a recognized teaching qualification (e.g. CELTA / Trinity Cert).

1.3.2.1.3. Other requirements are likely to or may include... - TDELTA or equivalent such as MA - - - TEFL/EFL including observed teaching/Trinity Diploma or International Equivalent - A bachelors degree as minimum - Experience and strong interest in teacher training and CPD

1.3.2.1.4. - Experience of conducting teacher observations - Experience of teaching IELTS exam preparation, EAP, Business English classes - Excellent IT skills, a demonstrable interest in technology and an ability to use technology in an educational environment - Excellent communication and customer service skills

1.3.2.1.5. - Substantial experience teaching a range of different courses and levels - Proven commitment to continuous professional development - Record of excellent student feedback

1.3.2.2. (Section 2.2) Senior teacher job role

1.3.2.2.1. While the specific role for senior teachers may vary, there are a lot of common areas that most senior teachers are responsible for. Let's take a look at some of those...

1.3.2.2.2. - Testing and placing students - Ensuring all documentation and records are kept up-to-date - Observing teachers and giving feedback - Providing support to teachers

1.3.2.2.3. - Managing teaching resources - Delivering teacher development sessions - Logging attendance and following-up student absences - Developing course plans - Assisting with recruitment, interviewing and induction

1.3.2.2.4. - Dealing with student enquiries - Submitting payroll on a weekly basis - Conducting teachers’ meetings - Arranging teaching cover

1.3.2.2.5. - Assisting the DoS with the overall management of the academic department and deputizing for the DoS in his/her absence -Ensuring that the highest quality of teaching is being delivered -Mentoring newly recruited teaching staff and instructing/supporting them in the academic and administrative processes of the school

1.3.2.2.6. -Identifying training needs and areas for improvement and leading staff training and development. -Monitoring and developing teaching and learning resources to ensure that appropriate materials and supplementary materials are available according to the syllabus -Acting as a primary point of contact in the academic department for all students and endeavouring to resolve issues in collaboration with the DoS -Teaching a variable lesson bank in agreement with the DoS

1.3.2.2.7. SENIOR TEACHER SALARY

1.3.2.3. (Section 2.3) Where to find Senior English teacher jobs?

1.3.3. (Section 3) CELTA trainer

1.3.3.1. (Section 3.1) How to become a teacher trainer

1.3.3.1.1. Substantial (normally five years) varied and current classroom-based ELT experience preferably in more than one context.

1.3.3.1.2. Experience of teaching a range of levels and different types of class is a requirement.

1.3.3.1.3. Cambridge Deltas Modules (One, Two and Three), the Cambridge DTEFLA, Cambridge English DELTA or Trinity Dip. TESOL. If the proposed trainer-in-training does not have any of the above, a transcript of the award must be submitted to Cambridge English for special consideration before training can be verified.

1.3.3.1.4. for the qualifications to be considered they must be a post initial English Language Teaching qualification at Level 7 and they must include a practical component.

1.3.3.1.5. evidence of professional commitment (involvement in staff development, conference attendance, etc.)

1.3.3.2. (Section 3.2) Teacher trainer job role

1.3.3.2.1. Observing Teaching practice sessions

1.3.3.2.2. The position also includes in-service training and teacher/ tutor development.

1.3.3.2.3. *Designing and delivering input sessions

1.3.3.2.4. Marking assignments

1.3.3.2.5. *Conducting interviews

1.3.3.2.6. *Other aspects of CELTA

1.3.3.2.7. SALARY

1.3.3.3. (Section 3.3) Where to fin teacher trainer jobs?

1.3.3.3.1. There should be a thorough and rigorous application process. At the least, this should involve a wide-ranging and rigorous interview between you and the centre. The potential training supervisor should be involved (you need to have the chance to decide whether you will be able to work with this person, after all.) Expectations about the training process, time investment, and post-training commitments need to be made clear and agreed.

1.3.3.3.2. If both you and the centre agree to enter into a training agreement, then the centre would send an application on your behalf to Cambridge Assessment. Part of this application will be an outline of the training programme that the centre proposes you undertake and this, as well as your application, need to be approved by Cambridge before you may start training.

1.3.3.3.3. you need to be accepted as a trainer in training (TinT) by a specific centre. They need to accept you with a prospect of working with you post-training as an Assistant Course Tutor (ACT) for at least 3 courses.

1.3.3.3.4. This means that centres should not offer to train you without also agreeing to offer you at least this amount of work post-training. It also means that you should not look to be trained at a centre where you do not plan to remain for at least three courses post-approval to consolidate your training.

1.3.3.3.5. This also means that a centre should not charge you for your training. They should only offer to train you if they foresee a use for you within their team. If they think they should charge you, then your training cannot be valuable for them and they are only doing it for the money.

1.3.3.3.6. You should also already be working at the centre in some other capacity (for example as a teacher) or be working for another centre who cannot offer the training you are seeking.

1.3.4. (Section 4) Director of studies

1.3.4.1. (Section 4.1) How to become a director of studies

1.3.4.1.1. The requirements for becoming a senior teacher vary from each language school or language center,

1.3.4.1.2. Typically, Director of Studies will need A Bachelor’s Degree CELTA/Trinity Cert (or equivalent) and 2-5 years years of ESL teaching experience Management experience with responsibility for a team, preferably in ESL/EFL Strong communication skills, flexible and proactive

1.3.4.1.3. Other requirements typically include... - Delta - TESOL, university degree or relevant ·- Excellent interpersonal and communication skills, punctuality and professional manner - Commitment to professional development

1.3.4.1.4. Management experience a plus - Teacher training experience a plus - Recruitment experience a plus - Course planning experience a plus - Previous experience in a similar role - Willingness to learn about new teaching trends

1.3.4.2. (Section 4.2) Director of studies job role

1.3.4.2.1. - Deputize for the deputy headmaster/principal or headmaster/principal in their absence. - Assist the headmaster/principal in management matters. -Actively engage in the maintenance of discipline and good conduct. -Participate in the interviewing of candidates for ESL teaching posts.

1.3.4.2.2. - Take responsibility for all aspects of the curriculum associated with its planning, development, delivery, assessment, monitoring, and budgeting. -Take responsibility for all aspects of the management, performance, and development of the ESL teaching staff in accordance with specified academic objectives and goals. To this end, the DoS is required to provide the appropriate training where necessary and to monitor and review ESL staff performance. This would also include teacher induction training for novice ESL teachers, and regular teachers’ ‘professional development’ conferences.

1.3.4.2.3. -Set, monitor, and manage a school homework policy. - Organise and administer parents’ meetings and parents’ evenings. - Advise parents and ESL students on ESL curriculum options.

1.3.4.2.4. - Participate in the production of a school timetable. -Ensure that ESL teaching workloads are fairly allocated. -Organise extracurricular activities. -Laise with external ESL examination bodies. - Manage ESL staff and material re