Project Management Practice Maturity

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Project Management Practice Maturity Door Mind Map: Project Management Practice Maturity

1. Maturity Level 1: Every PM and Every project for Himself/Herself

1.1. Organization Integration

1.1.1. The Role of the PMO

1.1.1.1. Support Function

1.1.1.2. Only Project Perspective

1.1.1.2.1. No Portfolio View

1.1.2. PMO Induction

1.1.2.1. No Formal Induction

1.2. Practice Implemented

1.2.1. Policies

1.2.1.1. No formally published policies

1.2.1.1.1. Every project Manager uses its own

1.2.1.1.2. Policies communicated verbally

1.2.1.1.3. Changes Frequently

1.2.2. Procedures

1.2.2.1. No Standard Procedures

1.2.2.1.1. Projects uses their own and change it as per need

1.2.2.1.2. "Local Knowledge" superior

1.2.3. Know-How

1.2.3.1. As good as the history of the PM with the organization

1.2.3.1.1. Personal clout determines what can be done

1.2.3.1.2. Know enough to "work the system"

1.2.4. Continuous Improvement

1.2.4.1. No formal approach to standardise and improve

1.2.4.1.1. Practice as good as the Project Manager that is hired

1.2.5. Project Accounting

1.2.5.1. Basic Project financial tracking

1.2.5.1.1. Every Project does it in its own way

1.2.5.1.2. Some projects not tracking financials

1.3. Tools Implemented

1.3.1. No standard set of templates

1.3.1.1. Project Managers choose and customize what they deem required

1.3.1.1.1. Documents selected and customized as per project need.

1.3.2. Team Collaboration

1.3.2.1. Drawn out Project Meetings

1.3.2.1.1. Hallway chatter the norm

1.3.2.2. Politically motivated

1.3.2.2.1. Power broking

1.3.2.2.2. Always mitigating the next "crisis"

1.3.2.3. No Common document store

1.3.3. Projet Management WorkBench

1.3.3.1. None in use

1.3.3.2. Microsoft Project Files circulated

1.3.3.3. File-Share at best for document storing and sharing

1.4. Resourcing Approach

1.4.1. Internally employed resources working towards becoming a Project Manager

1.4.1.1. Double with other roles such as Business Analyst or technical analyst

1.4.2. Contracted Project Managers from the Open Market

1.4.2.1. Different backgrounds / Different ways of doing things

1.4.2.2. Each department hires their own Project Manager

1.4.2.3. Little to No integration into the organization

1.4.3. Time and expense tracking

1.4.3.1. Done manually, if at all.

1.4.4. No defined and preferred Project Team structure

1.4.4.1. Lead Designer responsibility carried by Project Manager

1.4.4.2. Business Change Management neglected

1.5. Quality and Coaching

1.5.1. Project Health Assessments

1.5.1.1. Mostly only done when there is an implosion in the Project / After the fact

1.5.1.1.1. Done when there is a "crisis"

1.5.1.2. Interpreted as a "witch-hunt"

1.5.2. Coaching

1.5.2.1. Supplementing poor performing Project Managers

1.5.2.1.1. "Need another guy"

1.5.2.1.2. "Need a different guy"

1.5.2.2. Replacing Project Managers frequently for perceived "lack of performance"

1.5.2.2.1. Limited recognition for project success as a "team sport"

1.5.2.2.2. Project Manager carries brunt of blame for failure.

1.5.3. Development Plans

1.5.3.1. No identified and formally managed development objectives for Project Managers

1.6. Communication Approach

1.6.1. Project Stakeholder meetings

1.6.1.1. Unstructured

1.6.1.1.1. Maybe at regular time intervals

1.6.1.2. Rarely minuted, if at all

1.6.1.3. As and when needed (selective group of "supportive" individuals)

1.6.1.3.1. Selective participation

1.6.1.3.2. Done with a group of "supportive" or "involved" individuals

1.6.2. Open Channels of Communication

1.6.2.1. Project messages sanctioned and "sanitized" for the audience

1.6.2.1.1. Power broker meetings

1.6.2.1.2. "Crisis" Meetings

1.6.2.2. Project metrics

1.6.2.2.1. Low to no metric driven approach

1.6.2.2.2. If available, not openly communicated

1.6.2.2.3. Not openly tracked and reported

1.6.2.2.4. Located in disparate documents, or spreadsheets

1.6.3. Status Reporting

1.6.3.1. Narrative "subjective" approach

1.6.3.1.1. Monthly or weekly

1.6.3.2. Different reports for different audiences

1.7. Methodology

1.7.1. Portfolio Management Life-Cycle (PoMLC)

1.7.1.1. Not in use -> No portfolio perspective.

1.7.1.2. No Project justification and scoring

1.7.1.3. No Portfolio-wide planning and tracking of resources, budget, etc.

1.7.2. Project Management Life-Cycle (PMLC)

1.7.2.1. No standard life-cycle across Projects

1.7.2.1.1. Customer approach for each project.

1.7.2.2. Confused with Solution Delivery Life-cycle

1.7.2.3. Every project stands up its own teams

1.7.2.3.1. Teams not integrated with a project delivery organization

1.7.3. Solution Delivery Life-Cycle

1.7.3.1. Default to Waterfall delivery

1.7.3.1.1. Not always justified or considered

1.7.3.1.2. Methodology considerations not getting attention during the planning of a project

1.7.3.1.3. Work Breakdown defaulting to methodology instead of product/outcome.

1.7.3.2. Confused with PMLC

1.7.4. Program Structure

1.7.4.1. Grouping disparate projects together under a "program"

1.7.4.2. Attempting a Potfolio Perspective

1.7.4.3. Delivery organizations not aligned for Program delivery

1.8. Portfolio Perspective

1.8.1. No Portfolio Perspective

2. Maturity Level 3: Automated Balanced Delivery

2.1. Organization Integration

2.1.1. The Role of the PMO

2.1.1.1. Support, Governance and Portfolio Delivery

2.1.1.1.1. PMO Responsible for Policy and Practice Definition

2.1.1.1.2. PMO Responsible for Policy and Practice Enforcement

2.1.1.1.3. PMO Responsible for Portfolio Delivery

2.1.1.2. Provides a Program/Portfolio Perspective of all Projects

2.1.1.2.1. Drives the Portfolio's Success

2.1.1.2.2. Chairs the Portfolio Governing Body

2.1.2. PMO Induction

2.1.2.1. Formal induction pack

2.1.2.1.1. "This is how we work here..."

2.1.2.1.2. Portfolio Induction

2.1.2.1.3. Sponsor Induction

2.1.2.2. Ongoing PMO Updates and Improvements

2.2. Practice Implemented

2.2.1. Policies

2.2.1.1. Formally Agreed and Published Policies

2.2.1.1.1. Policies in Policy Management Online Tool

2.2.1.1.2. Policies for...

2.2.2. Procedures

2.2.2.1. Standard Set of Procedures

2.2.2.1.1. Procedures in Online Procedure Management Tool

2.2.2.1.2. Procedures for...

2.2.3. Know-How

2.2.3.1. Supplementing Policy and Procedures

2.2.3.1.1. This is "How Best" to do it

2.2.4. Continuous Improvement

2.2.4.1. One procedure to improve all other...

2.2.4.1.1. Integrated in the practice activities

2.2.5. Project Accounting

2.2.5.1. Separated from Company Financial Accounting

2.2.5.2. Automated

2.2.5.2.1. When labour is booked to Project

2.2.5.2.2. When costs are booked to project

2.3. Tools Implemented

2.3.1. Standard set of Document Templates

2.3.1.1. Documents selected and customized as per project need.

2.3.1.2. Limit the number of documents

2.3.1.2.1. Move towards Project information management

2.3.2. Project Management Workbench

2.3.2.1. Work Management

2.3.2.1.1. WBS

2.3.2.1.2. Tasks

2.3.2.1.3. Labour

2.3.2.2. Document Store

2.3.2.3. Tracking: Financial, Effort, Progress, etc.

2.3.2.4. Team Site Collaboration

2.3.2.4.1. Messages

2.3.2.5. Automated Dashboard

2.3.2.5.1. Real time tracking

2.3.2.6. Portfolio Perspective

2.3.2.6.1. Consolidated reporting

2.3.3. Practice Management Tool

2.3.3.1. Containing Policies, Procedures, Know-How

2.3.3.2. Provide an editorial evolutionary approach to improve practices

2.3.3.3. Procedure ownership

2.3.3.3.1. Involve everybody to improve it

2.3.4. Collaborative Artifact Office Tools

2.3.4.1. Easy authoring, sharing, repurpose

2.3.4.2. History and version management

2.3.4.3. Integrated with Workbench

2.4. Resourcing Approach

2.4.1. Recognize Project Management as a niche discipline

2.4.1.1. Dedicated Project/Program Managers

2.4.2. Sourcing Project Management Services / Instad of Project Management People

2.4.2.1. Specific Vendor Relationship reflecting practice maturity

2.4.2.1.1. Aligned with Company practice

2.4.2.2. PMO Co-ordinates the hiring and selection

2.4.3. Time and expense tracking

2.4.3.1. Project Accounting and Financial Accounting Separated

2.4.3.1.1. Project Accounting included in Workbench Tool

2.5. Quality and Coaching

2.5.1. Project Health Assessments

2.5.1.1. Standard Project Health Check approach

2.5.1.1.1. Executed at regular intervals

2.5.2. Coaching

2.5.2.1. Project Management Capability Benchmarked

2.5.2.2. Formal approach to coach and develop Project Management Competence

2.5.2.2.1. Sourcing Competent Project Management Services

2.5.3. Development Plans

2.5.3.1. Documented and regularly reviewed in line with performance

2.6. Communication Approach

2.6.1. Project Stakeholder meetings

2.6.1.1. Regular Meetings

2.6.1.2. Set Agenda and Minutes Distributed

2.6.1.3. Formal Communication Plans

2.6.2. Open Channels of Communication

2.6.2.1. Project Metrics Openly Shared with Stakeholders

2.6.2.1.1. Viewable in online Workbench Dashboards in Real-Time

2.6.3. Status Reporting

2.6.3.1. Workbench Dashboards in Real Time

2.6.3.2. Cover notes to highlight specifics

2.6.3.3. Portfolio perspective automatically generated by Workbench

2.7. Methodology

2.7.1. Portfolio Management Life-Cycle (PoMLC)

2.7.1.1. Some perspective of overall project in flight

2.7.1.2. Project intake process with justification and scoring that is considered at departmental level only

2.7.1.3. Portfolio wide tracking of resources, budget, etc. done manually

2.7.1.3.1. Lots of Excel cut-and-paste activity

2.7.1.4. No Portfolio Stage Gates

2.7.2. Project Management Life-Cycle (PMLC)

2.7.2.1. Clearly defined and agreed common life-cycle with Project Stage Gates.

2.7.2.2. Delineated from Solution Delivery Life-cycle

2.7.3. Solution Delivery Life-Cycle

2.7.3.1. Selected and justified depending on the solution and delivery approach selected

2.7.4. Program Structure

2.7.4.1. Program perspective for a group of projects driving towards the same strategic goal

2.7.4.1.1. Program level reporting

2.7.4.1.2. Program level dependency management

2.7.4.1.3. Program level stakeholder, risk and issue management

2.7.4.2. Delivery organizations not aligned for Program delivery

2.7.4.2.1. Program stands up its own teams

2.8. Portfolio Perspective

2.8.1. Automated real-time Portfolio perspective

2.8.2. Portfolio Governance enforced department/company wide

2.8.3. Portfolio Governance Body meeting regularly

2.8.3.1. Operates with a defined mandate and constitution

3. Maturity Level 2: Standard and Consistent Practices

3.1. Organization Integration

3.1.1. The Role of the PMO

3.1.1.1. Support and Governance

3.1.1.1.1. PMO Responsible for Policy and Practice Definition

3.1.1.1.2. PMO Responsible for Policy and Practice Enforcement

3.1.1.2. Provides a Program/Portfolio Perspective of all Projects

3.1.2. PMO Induction

3.1.2.1. Formal induction pack

3.1.2.1.1. "This is how we work here..."

3.2. Practice Implemented

3.2.1. Policies

3.2.1.1. Formally Agreed and Published Policies

3.2.1.1.1. Policies in Document Form

3.2.2. Procedures

3.2.2.1. Standard Set of Published Procedures

3.2.2.1.1. Procedures in Document Form

3.2.3. Know-How

3.2.3.1. As good as the history of the PM with the organization

3.2.3.1.1. Personal clout enforces authority -> Can get things done.

3.2.4. Continuous Improvement

3.2.4.1. No formal approach to standardise and improve

3.2.4.1.1. Practice as good as the Project Manager that is hired

3.2.4.2. Bureaucratic process for getting policies and procedures implemented or changed

3.2.5. Project Accounting

3.2.5.1. Directed by Financial Accounting Practices of the Company

3.2.5.2. Done with spreadsheets

3.2.5.3. Help of online time tracking tools for Project Resources

3.3. Tools Implemented

3.3.1. Standard set of Document Templates

3.3.1.1. Prescribed documents selected and customized as per project need.

3.3.1.2. Document templates adding additional overhead

3.3.2. Team Collaboration

3.3.2.1. Formal meeting checkpoints

3.3.2.1.1. Less hallway conversations

3.3.2.2. Team Site Collaboration

3.3.2.2.1. Common Document Store

3.3.2.2.2. Team messages

3.3.3. Project Management Workbench

3.3.3.1. Not in use

3.3.3.2. MS Project Files used for scheduling

3.3.3.3. Dashboard approach manually populated

3.3.3.4. Spreadsheet tracking

3.4. Resourcing Approach

3.4.1. Recognize Project Management as a niche discipline

3.4.1.1. Dedicated Project Managers

3.4.2. Contracted Project Managers from the Open Market

3.4.2.1. Different backgrounds / Different ways of doing things

3.4.2.2. PMO Co-ordinates the hiring and selection

3.4.2.3. Some support to integrate into the organization

3.4.2.3.1. Induction helps

3.4.3. Time and expense tracking

3.4.3.1. Automated time and expense tracking in a disparate software tool (mostly linked with, or part of a financial system)

3.5. Quality and Coaching

3.5.1. Project Health Assessments

3.5.1.1. Standard Project Health Check approach

3.5.1.1.1. Executed at regular intervals

3.5.2. Coaching

3.5.2.1. Project Management Capability Benchmarked

3.5.2.2. Formal approach to coach and develop Project Management Competence

3.5.3. Development Plans

3.5.3.1. Documented and regularly reviewed in line with performance

3.6. Communication Approach

3.6.1. Project Stakeholder meetings

3.6.1.1. Regular Meetings

3.6.1.1.1. All applicable stakeholders included

3.6.1.2. Set Agenda and Minutes Distributed

3.6.1.3. Formal Communication Plans agreed ahead of schedule

3.6.2. Open Channels of Communication

3.6.2.1. Project Metrics Openly Shared with Stakeholders

3.6.2.2. Transparent communications

3.6.3. Status Reporting

3.6.3.1. Standard Dashboard with highlighted cover notes

3.6.3.1.1. Weekly intervals

3.6.3.2. Portfolio perspective manually compiled from Project Data

3.6.3.3. Data driven reporting metrics

3.6.3.3.1. Transparency

3.7. Methodology

3.7.1. Portfolio Management Life-Cycle (PoMLC)

3.7.1.1. Some perspective of overall projects in flight in the Portfolio

3.7.1.2. Project intake process with justification and scoring that is considered at departmental level only

3.7.1.3. Portfolio wide tracking of resources, budget, etc. done manually

3.7.1.3.1. Lots of Excel cut-and-paste activity

3.7.1.4. No Portfolio Stage Gates

3.7.1.4.1. Only Project Stage Gate Governance

3.7.2. Project Management Life-Cycle (PMLC)

3.7.2.1. Clearly defined and agreed common life-cycle with Project Stage Gates.

3.7.2.2. Delineated from Solution Delivery Life-cycle

3.7.2.3. Aligned with Standard Policies and Procedures commonly applied to all Projects

3.7.3. Solution Delivery Life-Cycle

3.7.3.1. Selected and justified depending on the solution and delivery approach selected

3.7.3.2. Can apply waterfall, iterative, vendor driven methodologies as needed by the solution involved

3.7.4. Program Structure

3.7.4.1. Program perspective for a group of projects driving towards the same strategic goal

3.7.4.1.1. Program level reporting

3.7.4.1.2. Program level dependency management

3.7.4.1.3. Program level stakeholder, risk and issue management

3.7.4.2. Delivery organizations not aligned for Program delivery

3.7.4.2.1. Program stands up its own teams

3.8. Portfolio Perspective

3.8.1. Manual portfolio perspective

3.8.2. No Portfolio governance

3.8.2.1. Projects/ Program Governance only.

3.8.2.2. No Portfolio Life-cycle applied for investment decisions

3.8.2.3. No Portfolio Governance body.