How are radioactive isotopes produced, and how can they assist in science and medicine and industry?

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How are radioactive isotopes produced, and how can they assist in science and medicine and industry? by Mind Map: How are radioactive isotopes produced, and how can they assist in science and medicine and industry?

1. Reactions

1.1. What are Chemical reactions?

1.2. What are Nuclear reactions?

1.2.1. What is Natural nuclear decay?

1.2.2. What is Nuclear Fission?

1.2.2.1. Nuclear fission is a process in nuclear physics.

1.2.2.2. The nucleus of an atom splits into two or more smaller nuclei as fission products and usually some by-product particles.

1.2.2.3. Fission is a form of elemental transmutation.

1.2.3. What is Nuclear Fusion?

1.2.3.1. Two or more atomic nuclei are combined.

1.2.3.2. Forms one or more different atomic nuclei and subatomic particles (neutrons or protons)

1.2.3.3. The difference in mass between the reactants and products is manifested as either the release or absorption of energy.

2. Questions

2.1. What is Radiation and Radio activity?

2.1.1. Radiation

2.1.1.1. The term radiation refers to the movement of energy through matter of space.

2.1.1.2. E.g. light, microwaves, x-rays, radiotherapy.

2.1.1.3. There is an entire spectrum of radiation, and different types of radiation have different properties and uses.

2.1.2. Radioactivity.

2.1.2.1. A term that describes the natural process by which some atoms spontaneously disintegrate, emitting both particles and energy as they transform into different, more stable atoms.

2.1.2.1.1. Uses of radioactivity: smoke detectors, radiotherapy, sterilisation if food, pacemakers.

2.1.2.1.2. Dager for humans who are exposed to exposed to large amounts of radiation: Cancer and infertility.

2.1.2.2. Some elements are always radioactive regardless of what isotope is present. Lead is the heaviest stable elements and has 82 protons.

2.2. What are isotopes?

2.2.1. Isotopes are simply defined as the same chemical element with different numbers of neutrons.

2.2.1.1. We refer to different isotopes of a given element by combing their element name with their atomic mass number.

2.2.1.1.1. Summary of changes to an atom

2.2.1.2. Different isotopes have different stabilities .

2.3. What are radioactive isotopes