The Positives and Negatives of Inclusion of Special Education in a Regular Class Setting

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The Positives and Negatives of Inclusion of Special Education in a Regular Class Setting by Mind Map: The Positives and Negatives of Inclusion of Special Education in a Regular Class Setting

1. Negatives of Inclusion of SPED

2. Academic Progress of Students Across Inclusive and Traditional Settings Cassandra M. Cole, Nancy Waldron, and Massoumeh Majd (2004) Academic Progress of Students Across Inclusive and Traditional Settings. Mental Retardation: April 2004, Vol. 42, No. 2, pp. 136-144.

2.1. For students with disabilities, there were no significant differences in reading and math achievement across the comparison groups. However, a review of group means and the percentage of students making comparable or greater than average academic progress when compared to students without disabilities indicates a pattern in favor of inclusive settings.

3. Positives of Inclusion of SPED

4. The Inclusive Secondary School Teacher in AustraliaPearce, M. (2009). The Inclusive Secondary School Teacher in Australia. International Journal of Whole Schooling, [online] 5(2), pp.1-15.

4.1. As a result of the 1992 Disability Discrimination Act in Australia and parental support for inclusion, regular teachers now include students with disabilities in their classes. Inclusion has been more successful in primary than in secondary schools. Secondary schools remain a challenge due to their traditional focus on curriculum, examinations, subjects and the large numbers of students allocated to each teacher.

5. Creating an Inclusive SchoolCassandra M. Cole, Nancy Waldron, and Massoumeh Majd (2004) Academic Progress of Students Across Inclusive and Traditional Settings. Mental Retardation: April 2004, Vol. 42, No. 2, pp. 136-144.

5.1. In the 1970s, the natural sequal to the thinking engendered by Brown v. The Board of Education (Warren 1954) for students with disabilities began to be widely enacted in the U.S legal systems.

6. Confronting Obstacles to Inclusion International Responses to Developing Inclusive Education. Cassandra M. Cole, Nancy Waldron, and Massoumeh Majd (2004) Academic Progress of Students Across Inclusive and Traditional Settings. Mental Retardation: April 2004, Vol. 42, No. 2, pp. 136-144.

6.1. Teacher assistants can play important support roles in inclusive classrooms by engaging in tasks that create opportunities for general and special educators to spend more time instructing all students and collaborating with each other.

7. Inclusion of "All" Students in General Education? International Appeal for a More Temperate Approach to Inclusion. Kauffman, James M. Inclusion of "All" Students in General Education? International Appeal for a More Temperate Approach to Inclusion. Journal of International Special Needs Education, v21 n2 p1-10 2018

7.1. Including students with disabilities in general education when appropriate is an important goal of special education. However, inclusion is not as important as effective instruction, which must be the first concern of education, general or special.

8. Promoting Inclusive Education: The Role of Teachers' Competence and Attitudes. Pit-ten Cate. Promoting Inclusive Education: The Role of Teachers' Competence and Attitudes. Insights into Learning Disabilities, v15 n1 p49-63 2018

8.1. Teachers are expected to accommodate an increasingly heterogeneous student population. However, teachers often feel ill prepared and, hence, may be apprehensive toward the inclusion of students with special education needs (SEN) in regular classrooms

9. Leadership, Inclusion, and Quality Education for All. Carter, Susan. Leadership, Inclusion, and Quality Education for All. Australasian Journal of Special and Inclusive Education, v42 spec iss 1 p49-64 Jul 2018

9.1. The purpose of this research was to investigate leadership facilitating effective inclusive school practices. Data were collected from leaders at a complex multicultural school perceived by the system and local community as an inclusive school with a focus on quality education.

10. LIST OF REFERENCES:Pit-ten Cate. Promoting Inclusive Education: 1. The Role of Teachers' Competence and Attitudes. Insights into Learning Disabilities, v15 n1 p49-63 2018 2. Kauffman, James M. Inclusion of "All" Students in General Education? International Appeal for a More Temperate Approach to Inclusion. Journal of International Special Needs Education, v21 n2 p1-10 2018 3. Cassandra M. Cole, Nancy Waldron, and Massoumeh Majd (2004) Academic Progress of Students Across Inclusive and Traditional Settings. Mental Retardation: April 2004, Vol. 42, No. 2, pp. 136-144. 4. Cassandra M. Cole, Nancy Waldron, and Massoumeh Majd (2004) Academic Progress of Students Across Inclusive and Traditional Settings. Mental Retardation: April 2004, Vol. 42, No. 2, pp. 136-144. 5. Carter, Susan. Leadership, Inclusion, and Quality Education for All. Australasian Journal of Special and Inclusive Education, v42 spec iss 1 p49-64 Jul 2018. 6.Pearce, M. (2009). The Inclusive Secondary School Teacher in Australia. International Journal of Whole Schooling, [online] 5(2), pp.1-15. 7. Cassandra M. Cole, Nancy Waldron, and Massoumeh Majd (2004) Academic Progress of Students Across Inclusive and Traditional Settings. Mental Retardation: April 2004, Vol. 42, No. 2, pp. 136-144.