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Bacula Configs by Mind Map: Bacula Configs
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Bacula Configs

bacula-dir.conf

Of all the configuration files needed to run Bacula, the Director's is the most complicated, and the one that you will need to modify the most often as you add clients or modify the FileSets. For a general discussion of configuration files and resources including the data types recognized by Bacula. Please see the Configuration chapter of this manual. Director Resource Types Director resource type may be one of the following: Job, JobDefs, Client, Storage, Catalog, Schedule, FileSet, Pool, Director, or Messages. We present them here in the most logical order for defining them: Note, everything revolves around a job and is tied to a job in one way or another. Director -- to define the Director's name and its access password used for authenticating the Console program. Only a single Director resource definition may appear in the Director's configuration file. If you have either /dev/random or bc on your machine, Bacula will generate a random password during the configuration process, otherwise it will be left blank. Job -- to define the backup/restore Jobs and to tie together the Client, FileSet and Schedule resources to be used for each Job. Normally, you will Jobs of different names corresponding to each client (i.e. one Job per client, but a different one with a different name for each client). JobDefs -- optional resource for providing defaults for Job resources. Schedule -- to define when a Job is to be automatically run by Bacula's internal scheduler. You may have any number of Schedules, but each job will reference only one. FileSet -- to define the set of files to be backed up for each Client. You may have any number of FileSets but each Job will reference only one. Client -- to define what Client is to be backed up. You will generally have multiple Client definitions. Each Job will reference only a single client. Storage -- to define on what physical device the Volumes should be mounted. You may have one or more Storage definitions. Pool -- to define the pool of Volumes that can be used for a particular Job. Most people use a single default Pool. However, if you have a large number of clients or volumes, you may want to have multiple Pools. Pools allow you to restrict a Job (or a Client) to use only a particular set of Volumes. Catalog -- to define in what database to keep the list of files and the Volume names where they are backed up. Most people only use a single catalog. However, if you want to scale the Director to many clients, multiple catalogs can be helpful. Multiple catalogs require a bit more management because in general you must know what catalog contains what data. Currently, all Pools are defined in each catalog. This restriction will be removed in a later release. Messages -- to define where error and information messages are to be sent or logged. You may define multiple different message resources and hence direct particular classes of messages to different users or locations (files, ...). Example Director Configuration File An example Director configuration file might be the following: ## Default Bacula Director Configuration file## The only thing that MUST be changed is to add one or more# file or directory names in the Include directive of the# FileSet resource.## For Bacula release 1.15 (5 March 2002) -- redhat## You might also want to change the default email address# from root to your address. See the "mail" and "operator"# directives in the Messages resource.#Director { # define myself Name = rufus-dir QueryFile = "/home/kern/bacula/bin/query.sql" WorkingDirectory = "/home/kern/bacula/bin/working" PidDirectory = "/home/kern/bacula/bin/working" Password = "XkSfzu/Cf/wX4L8Zh4G4/yhCbpLcz3YVdmVoQvU3EyF/"}# Define the backup JobJob { Name = "NightlySave" Type = Backup Level = Incremental # default Client=rufus-fd FileSet="Full Set" Schedule = "WeeklyCycle" Storage = DLTDrive Messages = Standard Pool = Default}Job { Name = "Restore" Type = Restore Client=rufus-fd FileSet="Full Set" Where = /tmp/bacula-restores Storage = DLTDrive Messages = Standard Pool = Default} # List of files to be backed upFileSet { Name = "Full Set" Include { Options { signature=SHA1}## Put your list of files here, one per line or include an# external list with:## @file-name## Note: / backs up everything File = /} Exclude {}}# When to do the backupsSchedule { Name = "WeeklyCycle" Run = level=Full sun at 2:05 Run = level=Incremental mon-sat at 2:05}# Client (File Services) to backupClient { Name = rufus-fd Address = rufus Catalog = MyCatalog Password = "MQk6lVinz4GG2hdIZk1dsKE/LxMZGo6znMHiD7t7vzF+" File Retention = 60d # sixty day file retention Job Retention = 1y # 1 year Job retention AutoPrune = yes # Auto apply retention periods}# Definition of DLT tape storage deviceStorage { Name = DLTDrive Address = rufus Password = "jMeWZvfikUHvt3kzKVVPpQ0ccmV6emPnF2cPYFdhLApQ" Device = "HP DLT 80" # same as Device in Storage daemon Media Type = DLT8000 # same as MediaType in Storage daemon}# Definition for a DLT autochanger deviceStorage { Name = Autochanger Address = rufus Password = "jMeWZvfikUHvt3kzKVVPpQ0ccmV6emPnF2cPYFdhLApQ" Device = "Autochanger" # same as Device in Storage daemon Media Type = DLT-8000 # Different from DLTDrive Autochanger = yes}# Definition of DDS tape storage deviceStorage { Name = SDT-10000 Address = rufus Password = "jMeWZvfikUHvt3kzKVVPpQ0ccmV6emPnF2cPYFdhLApQ" Device = SDT-10000 # same as Device in Storage daemon Media Type = DDS-4 # same as MediaType in Storage daemon}# Definition of 8mm tape storage deviceStorage { Name = "8mmDrive" Address = rufus Password = "jMeWZvfikUHvt3kzKVVPpQ0ccmV6emPnF2cPYFdhLApQ" Device = "Exabyte 8mm" MediaType = "8mm"}# Definition of file storage deviceStorage { Name = File Address = rufus Password = "jMeWZvfikUHvt3kzKVVPpQ0ccmV6emPnF2cPYFdhLApQ" Device = FileStorage Media Type = File}# Generic catalog serviceCatalog { Name = MyCatalog dbname = bacula; user = bacula; password = ""}# Reasonable message delivery -- send most everything to# the email address and to the consoleMessages { Name = Standard mail = root@localhost = all, !skipped, !terminate operator = root@localhost = mount console = all, !skipped, !saved} # Default pool definitionPool { Name = Default Pool Type = Backup AutoPrune = yes Recycle = yes}## Restricted console used by tray-monitor to get the status of the director#Console { Name = Monitor Password = "GN0uRo7PTUmlMbqrJ2Gr1p0fk0HQJTxwnFyE4WSST3MWZseR" CommandACL = status, .status}

Client

The Client resource defines the attributes of the Clients that are served by this Director; that is the machines that are to be backed up. You will need one Client resource definition for each machine to be backed up. The following is an example of a valid Client resource definition: Client { Name = Minimatou Address = minimatou Catalog = MySQL Password = very_good}

Name

Address

Catalog

Password

Optional, FDPort, File Retention, Job Retention, AutoPrune, Maximum Concurrent Jobs

Director

The Director resource defines the attributes of the Directors running on the network. In the current implementation, there is only a single Director resource. The following is an example of a valid Director resource definition: Director { Name = HeadMan WorkingDirectory = "$HOME/bacula/bin/working" Password = UA_password PidDirectory = "$HOME/bacula/bin/working" QueryFile = "$HOME/bacula/bin/query.sql" Messages = Standard}

Name

Password

WorkingDirectory

PidDirectory

QueryFile

Messages

Optional, Description, Scripts Directory, Heartbeat Interval (0), Maximum Concurrent Jobs (1), FD Connect Timeout (30 minutes), DirAddresses, DIRport (9101), DirAddress, DirSourceAddress, Statistics Retention (5 years), VerId, MaxConsoleConnections (20)

Counter

The Counter Resource defines a counter variable that can be accessed by variable expansion used for creating Volume labels with the LabelFormat directive. See the LabelFormat directive in this chapter for more details.

Name

Optional, Minimum, Maximum, Catalog

Catalog

The Catalog Resource defines what catalog to use for the current job. Currently, Bacula can only handle a single database server (SQLite, MySQL, PostgreSQL) that is defined when configuring Bacula. However, there may be as many Catalogs (databases) defined as you wish. For example, you may want each Client to have its own Catalog database, or you may want backup jobs to use one database and verify or restore jobs to use another database. Since SQLite is compiled in, it always runs on the same machine as the Director and the database must be directly accessible (mounted) from the Director. However, since both MySQL and PostgreSQL are networked databases, they may reside either on the same machine as the Director or on a different machine on the network. See below for more details. The following is an example of a valid Catalog resource definition: Catalog{ Name = SQLite dbname = bacula; user = bacula; password = "" # no password = no security} or for a Catalog on another machine: Catalog{ Name = MySQL dbname = bacula user = bacula password = "" DB Address = remote.acme.com DB Port = 1234}

Name

dbname

dbuser

dbpassword

Optional, DB Socket, DB Address, DB Port

Messages

The Messages resource defines how messages are to be handled and destinations to which they should be sent. Even though each daemon has a full message handler, within the File daemon and the Storage daemon, you will normally choose to send all the appropriate messages back to the Director. This permits all the messages associated with a single Job to be combined in the Director and sent as a single email message to the user, or logged together in a single file. Each message that Bacula generates (i.e. that each daemon generates) has an associated type such as INFO, WARNING, ERROR, FATAL, etc. Using the message resource, you can specify which message types you wish to see and where they should be sent. In addition, a message may be sent to multiple destinations. For example, you may want all error messages both logged as well as sent to you in an email. By defining multiple messages resources, you can have different message handling for each type of Job (e.g. Full backups versus Incremental backups). In general, messages are attached to a Job and are included in the Job report. There are some rare cases, where this is not possible, e.g. when no job is running, or if a communications error occurs between a daemon and the director. In those cases, the message may remain in the system, and should be flushed at the end of the next Job. However, since such messages are not attached to a Job, any that are mailed will be sent to /usr/lib/sendmail. On some systems, such as FreeBSD, if your sendmail is in a different place, you may want to link it to the the above location. The records contained in a Messages resource consist of a destination specification followed by a list of message-types in the format: destination = message-type1, message-type2, message-type3, ... or for those destinations that need and address specification (e.g. email): destination = address = message-type1, message-type2, message-type3, ... Where destination is one of a predefined set of keywords that define where the message is to be sent (stdout, file, ...), message-type is one of a predefined set of keywords that define the type of message generated by Bacula (ERROR, WARNING, FATAL, ...), and address varies according to the destination keyword, but is typically an email address or a filename. The following are the list of the possible record definitions that can be used in a message resource.

Name

mailcommand

operatorcommand

<destination> = <message-type1>, <message-type2>, ..., stdout, stderr, console

<destination> = <address> = <message-type1>, <message-type2>, ..., director, file, syslog, mail, mail on error, mail on success, operator, console, catalog

<message-type>, info, warning, error

Schedule

The Schedule resource provides a means of automatically scheduling a Job as well as the ability to override the default Level, Pool, Storage and Messages resources. If a Schedule resource is not referenced in a Job, the Job can only be run manually. In general, you specify an action to be taken and when. No Schedule resource is required, but you will need at least one if you want Jobs to be automatically started. Technical Notes on Schedules Internally Bacula keeps a schedule as a bit mask. There are six masks and a minute field to each schedule. The masks are hour, day of the month (mday), month, day of the week (wday), week of the month (wom), and week of the year (woy). The schedule is initialized to have the bits of each of these masks set, which means that at the beginning of every hour, the job will run. When you specify a month for the first time, the mask will be cleared and the bit corresponding to your selected month will be selected. If you specify a second month, the bit corresponding to it will also be added to the mask. Thus when Bacula checks the masks to see if the bits are set corresponding to the current time, your job will run only in the two months you have set. Likewise, if you set a time (hour), the hour mask will be cleared, and the hour you specify will be set in the bit mask and the minutes will be stored in the minute field. For any schedule you have defined, you can see how these bits are set by doing a show schedules command in the Console program. Please note that the bit mask is zero based, and Sunday is the first day of the week (bit zero).

Name

Run

Run

Job

The Job resource defines a Job (Backup, Restore, ...) that Bacula must perform. Each Job resource definition contains the name of a Client and a FileSet to backup, the Schedule for the Job, where the data are to be stored, and what media Pool can be used. In effect, each Job resource must specify What, Where, How, and When or FileSet, Storage, Backup/Restore/Level, and Schedule respectively. Note, the FileSet must be specified for a restore job for historical reasons, but it is no longer used. Only a single type (Backup, Restore, ...) can be specified for any job. If you want to backup multiple FileSets on the same Client or multiple Clients, you must define a Job for each one. Note, you define only a single Job to do the Full, Differential, and Incremental backups since the different backup levels are tied together by a unique Job name. Normally, you will have only one Job per Client, but if a client has a really huge number of files (more than several million), you might want to split it into to Jobs each with a different FileSet covering only part of the total files. Multiple Storage daemons are not currently supported for Jobs, so if you do want to use multiple storage daemons, you will need to create a different Job and ensure that for each Job that the combination of Client and FileSet are unique. The Client and FileSet are what Bacula uses to restore a client, so if there are multiple Jobs with the same Client and FileSet or multiple Storage daemons that are used, the restore will not work. This problem can be resolved by defining multiple FileSet definitions (the names must be different, but the contents of the FileSets may be the same). The following is an example of a valid Job resource definition: Job { Name = "Minou" Type = Backup Level = Incremental                 # default Client = Minou FileSet="Minou Full Set" Storage = DLTDrive Pool = Default Schedule = "MinouWeeklyCycle" Messages = Standard }

Messages

Name

Type

Write Bootstrap

Client

Pool

Storage

FileSet

Level

Optional, Schedule, Enabled = Yes, Accurate, Verify Job, Bootstrap, Base, Full Backup Pool, Differential Backup Pool, Incremental Backup Pool, JobDefs, Maximum Bandwidth, Max Full Interval, Job time control directives, Max Start Delay (no limit), Max Run Time, Incremental Max Run Time, Differential Max Run Time, Max Run Sched Time, Max Wait Time, Max Full Age, Prefer Mounted Volumes (yes), Prune Jobs (no), Prune Files (no), Prune Volumes (no), RunScript, Run After Job, Run After Failed Job, Client Run Before Job, Client Run After Job, Rerun Failed Levels (no), Spool Data (no), Spool Attributes (no), Where, Add Prefix, Add Suffix, Strip Prefix, RegexWhere, Replace (always), Prefix Links (no), Duplicate jobs control directives, Allow Duplicate Jobs, Allow Higher Duplicates, Cancel Lower Level Duplicates, Cancel Queued Duplicates, Cancel Running Duplicates, Run, Priority (10), Allow Mixed Priority (no), Write Part After Job (no), Maximum Concurrent Jobs (1), Reschedule On Error (no), Reschedule Interval (do not reschedule on error), Reschedule Times (infinite)

JobDefs

The JobDefs resource permits all the same directives that can appear in a Job resource. However, a JobDefs resource does not create a Job, rather it can be referenced within a Job to provide defaults for that Job. This permits you to concisely define several nearly identical Jobs, each one referencing a JobDefs resource which contains the defaults. Only the changes from the defaults need to be mentioned in each Job.

Name

...

FileSet

The FileSet resource defines what files are to be included or excluded in a backup job. A FileSet resource is required for each backup Job. It consists of a list of files or directories to be included, a list of files or directories to be excluded and the various backup options such as compression, encryption, and signatures that are to be applied to each file. Any change to the list of the included files will cause Bacula to automatically create a new FileSet (defined by the name and an MD5 checksum of the Include/Exclude contents). Each time a new FileSet is created, Bacula will ensure that the next backup is always a Full save. Bacula is designed to handle most character sets of the world, US ASCII, German, French, Chinese, ... However, it does this by encoding everything in UTF-8, and it expects all configuration files (including those read on Win32 machines) to be in UTF-8 format. UTF-8 is typically the default on Linux machines, but not on all Unix machines, nor on Windows, so you must take some care to ensure that your locale is set properly before starting Bacula. On most modern Win32 machines, you can edit the conf files with notebook and choose output encoding UTF-8. To ensure that Bacula configuration files can be correctly read including foreign characters the bf LANG environment variable must end in .UTF-8. An full example is en_US.UTF-8. The exact syntax may vary a bit from OS to OS, and exactly how you define it will also vary. Bacula assumes that all filenames are in UTF-8 format on Linux and Unix machines. On Win32 they are in Unicode (UTF-16), and will be automatically converted to UTF-8 format.

Name

Include, Options, signature, File, File

Options

Exclude, File, File

Optional, Ignore FileSet Changes, Enable VSS

Storage

The Storage resource defines which Storage daemons are available for use by the Director. The following is an example of a valid Storage resource definition: # Definition of tape storage deviceStorage { Name = DLTDrive Address = lpmatou Password = storage_password # password for Storage daemon Device = "HP DLT 80" # same as Device in Storage daemon Media Type = DLT8000 # same as MediaType in Storage daemon}

Optional, SDPort, Autochanger, Maximum Concurrent Jobs, Heartbeat Interval

Name

Address

Password

Device

Media Type

Console

As of Bacula version 1.33 and higher, there are three different kinds of consoles, which the administrator or user can use to interact with the Director. These three kinds of consoles comprise three different security levels. The first console type is an anonymous or default console, which has full privileges. There is no console resource necessary for this type since the password is specified in the Director's resource and consequently such consoles do not have a name as defined on a Name = directive. This is the kind of console that was initially implemented in versions prior to 1.33 and remains valid. Typically you would use it only for administrators. The second type of console, and new to version 1.33 and higher is a "named" console defined within a Console resource in both the Director's configuration file and in the Console's configuration file. Both the names and the passwords in these two entries must match much as is the case for Client programs. This second type of console begins with absolutely no privileges except those explicitly specified in the Director's Console resource. Thus you can have multiple Consoles with different names and passwords, sort of like multiple users, each with different privileges. As a default, these consoles can do absolutely nothing -- no commands whatsoever. You give them privileges or rather access to commands and resources by specifying access control lists in the Director's Console resource. The ACLs are specified by a directive followed by a list of access names. Examples of this are shown below. The third type of console is similar to the above mentioned one in that it requires a Console resource definition in both the Director and the Console. In addition, if the console name, provided on the Name = directive, is the same as a Client name, that console is permitted to use the SetIP command to change the Address directive in the Director's client resource to the IP address of the Console. This permits portables or other machines using DHCP (non-fixed IP addresses) to "notify" the Director of their current IP address. The Console resource is optional and need not be specified.

Name

Password

ACLs, JobACL, CommandACL, ClientACL, StorageACL, ScheduleACL, PoolACL, FileSetACL, CatalogACL, WhereACL

Pool

The Pool resource defines the set of storage Volumes (tapes or files) to be used by Bacula to write the data. By configuring different Pools, you can determine which set of Volumes (media) receives the backup data. This permits, for example, to store all full backup data on one set of Volumes and all incremental backups on another set of Volumes. Alternatively, you could assign a different set of Volumes to each machine that you backup. This is most easily done by defining multiple Pools. Another important aspect of a Pool is that it contains the default attributes (Maximum Jobs, Retention Period, Recycle flag, ...) that will be given to a Volume when it is created. This avoids the need for you to answer a large number of questions when labeling a new Volume. Each of these attributes can later be changed on a Volume by Volume basis using the update command in the console program. Note that you must explicitly specify which Pool Bacula is to use with each Job. Bacula will not automatically search for the correct Pool. Most often in Bacula installations all backups for all machines (Clients) go to a single set of Volumes. In this case, you will probably only use the Default Pool. If your backup strategy calls for you to mount a different tape each day, you will probably want to define a separate Pool for each day. For more information on this subject, please see the Backup Strategies chapter of this manual. To use a Pool, there are three distinct steps. First the Pool must be defined in the Director's configuration file. Then the Pool must be written to the Catalog database. This is done automatically by the Director each time that it starts, or alternatively can be done using the create command in the console program. Finally, if you change the Pool definition in the Director's configuration file and restart Bacula, the pool will be updated alternatively you can use the update pool console command to refresh the database image. It is this database image rather than the Director's resource image that is used for the default Volume attributes. Note, for the pool to be automatically created or updated, it must be explicitly referenced by a Job resource. Next the physical media must be labeled. The labeling can either be done with the label command in the console program or using the btape program. The preferred method is to use the label command in the console program. Finally, you must add Volume names (and their attributes) to the Pool. For Volumes to be used by Bacula they must be of the same Media Type as the archive device specified for the job (i.e. if you are going to back up to a DLT device, the Pool must have DLT volumes defined since 8mm volumes cannot be mounted on a DLT drive). The Media Type has particular importance if you are backing up to files. When running a Job, you must explicitly specify which Pool to use. Bacula will then automatically select the next Volume to use from the Pool, but it will ensure that the Media Type of any Volume selected from the Pool is identical to that required by the Storage resource you have specified for the Job. If you use the label command in the console program to label the Volumes, they will automatically be added to the Pool, so this last step is not normally required. It is also possible to add Volumes to the database without explicitly labeling the physical volume. This is done with the add console command. As previously mentioned, each time Bacula starts, it scans all the Pools associated with each Catalog, and if the database record does not already exist, it will be created from the Pool Resource definition. Bacula probably should do an update pool if you change the Pool definition, but currently, you must do this manually using the update pool command in the Console program. In order for a Pool to be used during a Backup Job, the Pool must have at least one Volume associated with it. Volumes are created for a Pool using the label or the add commands in the Bacula Console, program. In addition to adding Volumes to the Pool (i.e. putting the Volume names in the Catalog database), the physical Volume must be labeled with a valid Bacula software volume label before Bacula will accept the Volume. This will be automatically done if you use the label command. Bacula can automatically label Volumes if instructed to do so, but this feature is not yet fully implemented. The following is an example of a valid Pool resource definition: Pool { Name = Default Pool Type = Backup}

Optional, Storage, Use Volume Once, Maximum Volumes, Maximum Volume Jobs, Maximum Volume Files, Maximum Volume Bytes, Volume Use Duration, Catalog Files, AutoPrune, Volume Retention, ScratchPool, RecyclePool, Recycle, Recycle Oldest Volume, Recycle Current Volume, Purge Oldest Volume, Cleaning Prefix, Label Format

Name

Pool Type

bacula-sd.conf

The Storage Daemon configuration file has relatively few resource definitions. However, due to the great variation in backup media and system capabilities, the storage daemon must be highly configurable. As a consequence, there are quite a large number of directives in the Device Resource definition that allow you to define all the characteristics of your Storage device (normally a tape drive). Fortunately, with modern storage devices, the defaults are sufficient, and very few directives are actually needed. Examples of Device resource directives that are known to work for a number of common tape drives can be found in the /examples/devices directory, and most will also be listed here. For a general discussion of configuration file and resources including the data types recognized by Bacula, please see the Configuration chapter of this manual. The following Storage Resource definitions must be defined: Storage -- to define the name of the Storage daemon. Director -- to define the Director's name and his access password. Device -- to define the characteristics of your storage device (tape drive). Messages -- to define where error and information messages are to be sent.

Messages

director

Name

Storage

In general, the properties specified under the Storage resource define global properties of the Storage daemon. Each Storage daemon configuration file must have one and only one Storage resource definition. The following is a typical Storage daemon Storage definition. ## "Global" Storage daemon configuration specifications appear# under the Storage resource.#Storage { Name = "Storage daemon" Address = localhost WorkingDirectory = "~/bacula/working" Pid Directory = "~/bacula/working"}

Name

WorkingDirectory

Pid Directory

Optional, Heartbeat Interval (disabled), Client Connect Wait (30 minutes), Maximum Concurrent Jobs (10), SDPort (9103), SDAddress (any available), SDAddresses

Director

The Director resource specifies the Name of the Director which is permitted to use the services of the Storage daemon. There may be multiple Director resources. The Director Name and Password must match the corresponding values in the Director's configuration file. The following is an example of a valid Director resource definition: Director { Name = MainDirector Password = my_secret_password}

Name

Password

Monitor (allow control)

Device

The Device Resource specifies the details of each device (normally a tape drive) that can be used by the Storage daemon. There may be multiple Device resources for a single Storage daemon. In general, the properties specified within the Device resource are specific to the Device.

Name

Media Type

Archive Device

LabelMedia

Random Access

AutomaticMount

RemoveableMedia

Optional, Device Type (tries to guess), Autochanger (no), Changer Device, Changer Command, Alert Command, Drive Index (0), Autoselect (yes), Maximum Changer Wait (5 minutes), Maximum Rewind Wait, Maximum Open Wait (5 minutes), AlwaysOpen (yes, ingored for Fille storage), Volume Poll Interval (no polling), Close on Poll, Requires Mount, Mount Point, Mount Comand, Unmount Command, Minimum block size (no limit), Maximum block size (no limit), Hardware End of Medium (yes), Fast Forward Space File (yes), Use MTIOCGET (yes), BSF at EOM (no), TWO EOF (no), Backward Space Record (yes), Backward Space File (yes for non random-access), Forward Space Record (yes), Forward Space File (yes), Offline On Unmount (no), Maximum Concurrent Jobs, Maximim File Size (1GB), Block Positioning (yes), Maximum Network Buffer Size (32768 bytes), Maximum Spool Size (no limit), Maximum Job Spool Size (no limit), Spool Directory (use the working directory), Maximum Part Size (no limit)

bacula-fd.conf

The Client (or File Daemon) Configuration is one of the simpler ones to specify. Generally, other than changing the Client name so that error messages are easily identified, you will not need to modify the default Client configuration file. For a general discussion of configuration file and resources including the data types recognized by Bacula, please see the Configuration chapter of this manual. The following Client Resource definitions must be defined: Client -- to define what Clients are to be backed up. Director -- to define the Director's name and its access password. Messages -- to define where error and information messages are to be sent. Example Client Configuration File An example File Daemon configuration file might be the following: # # Default  Bacula File Daemon Configuration file # #  For Bacula release 1.35.2 (16 August 2004) -- gentoo 1.4.16 # # There is not much to change here except perhaps to #   set the Director's name and File daemon's name #   to something more appropriate for your site. # # # List Directors who are permitted to contact this File daemon # Director { Name = rufus-dir Password = "/LqPRkX++saVyQE7w7mmiFg/qxYc1kufww6FEyY/47jU" } # # Restricted Director, used by tray-monitor to get the #   status of the file daemon # Director { Name = rufus-mon Password = "FYpq4yyI1y562EMS35bA0J0QC0M2L3t5cZObxT3XQxgxppTn" Monitor = yes } # # "Global" File daemon configuration specifications # FileDaemon {                          # this is me Name = rufus-fd WorkingDirectory = $HOME/bacula/bin/working Pid Directory = $HOME/bacula/bin/working } # Send all messages except skipped files back to Director Messages { Name = Standard director = rufus-dir = all, !skipped }

Director

The Director resource defines the name and password of the Directors that are permitted to contact this Client. Thus multiple Directors may be authorized to use this Client's services. Each Director will have a different name, and normally a different password as well. The following is an example of a valid Director resource definition: ## List Directors who are permitted to contact the File daemon#Director { Name = HeadMan Password = very_good # password HeadMan must supply}Director { Name = Worker Password = not_as_good Monitor = Yes}

Name

Password

Monitor (allow control)

FileDaemon

The Client Resource (or FileDaemon) resource defines the name of the Client (as used by the Director) as well as the port on which the Client listens for Director connections. The following is an example of a valid Client resource definition: Client { # this is me Name = rufus-fd WorkingDirectory = $HOME/bacula/bin/working Pid Directory = $HOME/bacula/bin/working}

Name

WorkingDirectory

Pid Directory

Optional, Heartbeat Interval (disabled), Maximum Concurrent Jobs (2), FDAddress (any available), FDport (9102), FD Addresses, FDSourceAddress (use system routing), SDConnectTimeout (30 minutes), Maximum Network Buffer Size (65536 bytes), PKI Encryption, PKI Signatures, PKI Keypair, PKI Master Key

Messages

director

Name

bconsole.conf

Director

Name

address

DIRport

Password