SEBTS MASTER ACADEMIC OUTLINE (DR. LEONARD O GOENAGA) LEONARDOGOENAGA.COM

SEBTS PHD COMPREHENSIVE EXAM (DR. LEONARD O GOENAGA)

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1. I. OUTLINE OF ACADEMIC DISCIPLINES

1.1. WWW.LEONARDOGOENAGA.COM

1.2. DEGREES: AA (BUSINESS & RELIGION; MDC)); BA (RELIGIOUS STUDIES; FIU); BA (POLITICAL SCIENCE; FIU)

1.3. A. HUMANITIES

1.3.1. 1. HUMAN HISTORY

1.3.2. 2. LINGUISTICS

1.3.3. 3. LITERATURE

1.3.4. 4. ARTS

1.3.5. 5. PHILOSOPHY

1.3.6. 6. RELIGION

1.3.6.1. Abrahamic Religions

1.3.6.1.1. Christianity (outline)

1.3.6.1.2. Islam/Islamic Studies

1.3.6.1.3. Judaism/Jewish Studies

1.3.6.2. Indian Religions

1.3.6.2.1. Buddhism

1.3.6.2.2. Hinduism

1.3.6.2.3. Jainism

1.3.6.2.4. Sikhism

1.3.6.3. East Asian Religions

1.3.6.3.1. Chinese Folk Religion

1.3.6.3.2. Confucianism

1.3.6.3.3. Shinto

1.3.6.3.4. Daoism

1.3.6.3.5. I-Kuan Tao

1.3.6.3.6. Caodaism

1.3.6.3.7. Chondogyo

1.3.6.3.8. Tenrikyo

1.3.6.3.9. Oomoto

1.3.6.4. Other Religions

1.3.6.4.1. African Religions

1.3.6.4.2. Ancient Egyptian Religions

1.3.6.4.3. Native American Religions

1.3.6.4.4. Gnosticism

1.3.6.4.5. Esotericism

1.3.6.4.6. New Religious Movements

1.3.6.4.7. Sumerian Religion

1.3.6.4.8. Zoroastrianism

1.3.6.5. Comparative Religion

1.3.6.6. Mythology and Folklore

1.3.6.7. Irreligion

1.3.6.7.1. Agnosticism

1.3.6.7.2. Atheism

1.4. B. SOCIAL SCIENCES

1.4.1. 1. ANTHROPOLOGY

1.4.2. 2. ARCHAEOLOGY

1.4.3. 3. AREA STUDIES

1.4.4. 4. CULTURAL AND ETHNIC STUDIES

1.4.5. 5. ECONOMICS

1.4.6. 6. GENDER AND SEXUALITY STUDIES

1.4.7. 7. GEOGRAPHY

1.4.8. 8. POLITICAL SCIENCE

1.4.8.1. American Politics

1.4.8.2. Civics

1.4.8.3. Comparative Politics

1.4.8.4. European Politics

1.4.8.5. Geopolitics

1.4.8.6. International Relations

1.4.8.7. International Organizations

1.4.8.8. Nationalism Studies

1.4.8.9. Peace and Conflict Studies

1.4.8.10. Policy Studies

1.4.8.11. Political Behaviour

1.4.8.12. Political Culture

1.4.8.13. Political Economy

1.4.8.14. Political History

1.4.8.15. Political Philosophy

1.4.8.16. Psephology

1.4.8.17. Public Administration

1.4.8.18. Public Policy

1.4.8.19. Social Choice Theory

1.4.9. 9. PSYCHOLOGY

1.4.10. 10. SOCIOLOGY

1.5. C. NATURAL SCIENCES

1.5.1. 1. BIOLOGY

1.5.2. 2. CHEMISTRY

1.5.3. 3. PHYSICS

1.5.4. 4. EARTH SCIENCES

1.5.5. 5. SPACE SCIENCES

1.6. D. FORMAL SCIENCES

1.6.1. 1. MATHEMATICS

1.6.2. 2. COMPUTER SCIENCES

1.6.3. 3. LOGIC

1.6.4. 4. STATISTICS

1.6.5. 5. SYSTEMS SCIENCE

1.7. E. PROFESSIONS

1.7.1. 1. AGRICULTURE

1.7.2. 2. ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN

1.7.3. 3. BUSINESS

1.7.4. 4. DIVINITY

1.7.4.1. Canon Law

1.7.4.2. Church History

1.7.4.3. Field Ministry

1.7.4.3.1. Pastoral Counseling

1.7.4.3.2. Pastoral Theology

1.7.4.3.3. Religious Education

1.7.4.3.4. Homiletics

1.7.4.3.5. Liturgy

1.7.4.3.6. Sacred Music

1.7.4.3.7. Missiology

1.7.4.4. Scriptural Study and Languages

1.7.4.4.1. Biblical Hebrew

1.7.4.4.2. Biblical Studies/Sacred Scripture

1.7.4.4.3. New Testament Greek

1.7.4.4.4. Latin

1.7.4.4.5. Old Church Slavonic

1.7.4.5. Theology

1.7.4.5.1. Dogmatic Theology

1.7.4.5.2. Ecclesiology

1.7.4.5.3. Sacramental Theology

1.7.4.5.4. Systematic Theology

1.7.4.5.5. Christian Ethics

1.7.5. 5. EDUCATION

1.7.6. 6. ENGINEERING

1.7.7. 7. ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES AND FORESTRY

1.7.8. 8. FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCE

1.7.9. 9. HUMAN PHYSICAL PERFORMANCE AND RECREATION

1.7.10. 10. JOURNALISM, MEDIA STUDIES, AND COMMUNICATION

1.7.11. 11. LAW

1.7.12. 12. LIBRARY AND MUSEUM STUDIES

1.7.13. 13. MEDICINE

1.7.14. 14. MILITARY SCIENCES

1.7.15. 15. PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION

1.7.16. 16. SOCIAL WORK

1.7.17. 17. TRANSPORTATION

2. II. OUTLINE OF DIVINITY/THEOLOGICAL STUDIES

2.1. WWW.BAPTISTETHICS.COM

2.2. DEGREES: MDIV (CHRISTIAN ETHICS; SEBTS)

2.3. A. HERMENEUTICS

2.4. B. CHRISTIAN ETHICS

2.5. C. BIBLICAL LANGUAGES

2.6. D. CHURCH HISTORY & MISSIONS

2.7. E. BIBLICAL STUDIES

2.8. F. CHRISTIAN PHILOSOPHY

2.9. G. CHRISTIAN MINISTRY (APPLIED)

2.10. H. THEOLOGY

2.10.1. 1. PROLEGOMENA

2.10.2. 2. DOCTRINE OF REVELATION

2.10.2.1. A) UNIVERSAL REVELATION

2.10.2.2. B) SPECIAL REVELATION

2.10.3. 3. DOCTRINE OF GOD

2.10.3.1. A) THE NATURE AND ATTRIBUTES OF GOD

2.10.3.2. B) THE WORKS OF GOD

2.10.4. 4. DOCTRINE OF THE TRINITY

2.10.5. 5. ANTHROPOLOGY

2.10.5.1. A) THE CREATION OF HUMANITY

2.10.5.2. B) THE IMAGE OF GOD

2.10.5.3. C) THE HUMAN CONSTITUTION

2.10.6. 6. HAMARTIOLOGY

2.10.7. 7. CHRISTOLOGY

2.10.8. 8. PNEUMATOLOGY

2.10.9. 9. SOTERIOLOGY

2.10.10. 10. ECCLESIOLOGY

2.10.11. 11. ESCHATOLOGY

3. III. OUTLINE OF ETHICS/MORAL PHILOSOPHY

3.1. WWW.EVANGELICALETHICS.COM

3.2. DEGREE: PHD (THEOLOGICAL STUDIES IN CHRISTIAN ETHICS; SEBTS)

3.3. A. METAETHICS

3.3.1. MORAL PHILOSOPHICAL APPROACH

3.3.2. 1. BRANCHES OF ETHICS

3.3.2.1. A. METAETHICS (WHY)

3.3.2.1.1. What is the meaning of moral terms or judgments?

3.3.2.1.2. What is the nature of moral judgments?

3.3.2.1.3. How may moral judgments be supported or defended?

3.3.2.2. B. NORMATIVE ETHICS (WHAT)

3.3.2.3. C. APPLIED ETHICS (COMMANDS->CONTEXT)

3.3.2.4. D. DESCRIPTIVE ETHICS (OBSERVATION)

3.3.3. 2. WORLDVIEWS BEHIND ETHICS

3.3.3.1. A. METAPHYSICS

3.3.3.2. B. EPISTEMOLOGY

3.3.3.3. C. ANTHROPOLOGY

3.3.3.4. D. THEOLOGY

3.3.3.5. E. ETHICS

3.3.4. 3. AUTHORITIES IN ETHICS

3.3.4.1. A. SCRIPTURE

3.3.4.2. B. TRADITION

3.3.4.3. C. REASON

3.3.4.4. D. EXPERIENCE

3.3.5. 4. CATEGORIES OF ETHICS

3.3.5.1. A. RELATIVISM

3.3.5.1.1. 1. SUBJECTIVISM

3.3.5.1.2. 2. CONVENTIONALISM

3.3.5.2. B. OBJECTIVISM

3.3.5.2.1. 1. MORAL INTUITIONISM

3.3.5.2.2. 2. DIVINE COMMAND

3.3.5.2.3. 3. MORAL REALISM

3.3.6. 5. MORAL DECISIONS IN ETHICS

3.3.6.1. A. ACTION

3.3.6.2. B. MOTIVE

3.3.6.3. C. CONSEQUENCES

3.3.6.4. D. CHARACTER

3.3.7. 6. FRAME'S TRISPECTIVALISM ETHIC

3.3.7.1. A. NORMS/PRINCIPLES

3.3.7.2. B. MOTIVES/EXISTENTIAL

3.3.7.3. C. CIRCUMSTANCES/CONTEXT

3.4. B. NORMATIVE ETHICS

3.4.1. 1. SYSTEMS IN ETHICS

3.4.1.1. 1. EGOISTIC

3.4.1.1.1. A. PSYCHOLOGICAL EGOISTIC

3.4.1.1.2. B. ETHICAL EGOISTIC

3.4.1.1.3. C. TWO FURTHER TYPES

3.4.1.2. 2. UTILITARIAN

3.4.1.2.1. A. ACT UTILITARIANISM

3.4.1.2.2. B. RULE UTILITARIANISM

3.4.1.3. 3. DEONTOLOGY

3.4.1.3.1. A. DUTY

3.4.1.3.2. B. 1CI: UNIVERSALIZATION

3.4.1.3.3. C. 2CI: RESPECT FOR EPRSONS

3.4.1.4. 4. VIRTUE (ARETAIC)

3.4.1.4.1. A. THE IDEAL TYPE

3.4.1.4.2. B. THE IDEAL INDIVIDUAL

3.4.2. 2. HISTORY OF ETHICS

3.4.2.1. 1. ORIGINS

3.4.2.2. 2. JEWISH ETHICS

3.4.2.3. 3. ANCIENT GREEK ETHICS

3.4.2.4. 4. CHRISTIAN ETHICS

3.4.2.5. 5. ASIAN ETHICS

3.4.2.5.1. A. HINDU ETHICS

3.4.2.5.2. B. BUDDHIST ETHICS

3.4.2.5.3. C. ISLAMIC ETHICS

3.4.2.5.4. D. TAOIST ETHICS

3.4.2.6. 6. NATURAL LAW ETHICS

3.4.2.7. 7. KANTIAN ETHICS

3.4.2.8. 8. UTILITARIAN ETHICS

3.4.2.9. 9. 20TH CENTURY ETHICS

3.4.3. 3. THINKERS IN ETHICS

3.4.3.1. 1. EPICURUS (EGOISM)

3.4.3.2. 2. JOHN STUART MILL (UTILITARIANSIM)

3.4.3.3. 3. DAVID HUME (HYBRID)

3.4.3.4. 4. IMMANUEL KANT (DEONTOLOGY)

3.4.3.5. 5. PLATO (VIRTUE)

3.4.3.6. 6. ARISTOTLE (VIRTUE)

3.4.3.7. 7. AUGUSTINE (DEONTOLOGICAL VIRTUE)

3.4.3.8. 8. THOMAS AQUINAS (NATURAL LAW)

3.4.3.9. 9. NIETZSCHE (POST MODERN)

3.4.3.10. 10. THOMAS HOBBES (SOCIAL CONTRACT ETHIC)

3.4.3.11. 11. RAWLS (SOCIAL CONTRACT ETHICS)

3.4.3.12. 12. SARTE (EXISTENTIAL ETHIC)

3.4.3.13. 13. KIERKEGAARD (EXISTENTIAL ETHIC)

3.4.3.14. 14. KARL MARX

3.5. C. APPLIED ETHICS

3.5.1. 1. BIOETHICS

3.5.2. 2. BUSINESS ETHICS

3.5.3. 3. ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS

3.5.4. 4. MACHINE ETHICS

3.5.5. 5.MILITARY ETHICS

3.5.6. 6. POLITICAL ETHICS

3.5.7. 7. PUBLIC SECTOR ETHICS

3.5.8. 8. PUBLICATION ETHICS

3.5.9. 9. SEXUAL ETHICS

3.6. D. DESCRIPTIVE ETHICS

4. IV. OUTLINE OF CHRISTIAN ETHICS/MORAL THEOLOGY

4.1. WWW.EVANGELICALETHICS.COM

4.2. DEGREE: PHD (THEOLOGICAL STUDIES IN CHRISTIAN ETHICS; SEBTS)

4.3. A. A CHRISTIAN METAETHIC

4.3.1. MORAL THEOLOGICAL APPROACH

4.3.2. 1. BRANCHES OF ETHICS

4.3.2.1. A. METAETHICS (WHY)

4.3.2.1.1. What is the meaning of moral terms or judgments?

4.3.2.1.2. What is the nature of moral judgments?

4.3.2.1.3. How many moral judgments be supported or defended?

4.3.2.2. B. NORMATIVE ETHICS (WHAT)

4.3.2.3. C. APPLIED ETHICS (COMMANDS->CONTEXT)

4.3.2.4. D. DESCRIPTIVE ETHICS (OBSERVATION)

4.3.3. 2. WORLDVIEWS BEHIND ETHICS

4.3.3.1. A. METAPHYSICS

4.3.3.2. B. EPISTEMOLOGY

4.3.3.3. C. ANTHROPOLOGY

4.3.3.4. D. THEOLOGY

4.3.3.5. E. ETHICS

4.3.4. 3. AUTHORITIES IN ETHICS

4.3.4.1. A. SCRIPTURE

4.3.4.2. B. TRADITION

4.3.4.3. C. REASON

4.3.4.4. D. EXPERIENCE

4.3.5. 4. CATEGORIES OF ETHICS

4.3.5.1. A. RELATIVISM

4.3.5.1.1. 1. SUBJECTIVISM

4.3.5.1.2. 2. CONVENTIONALISM

4.3.5.2. B. OBJECTIVISM

4.3.5.2.1. 1. MORAL INTUITIONISM

4.3.5.2.2. 2. DIVINE COMMAND

4.3.5.2.3. 3. MORAL REALISM

4.3.6. 5. MORAL DECISIONS IN ETHICS

4.3.6.1. A. ACTION

4.3.6.2. B. MOTIVE

4.3.6.3. C. CONSEQUENCES

4.3.6.4. D. CHARACTER

4.3.7. 6. FRAME'S TRISPECTIVALISM ETHIC

4.3.7.1. A. NORMS/PRINCIPLES

4.3.7.2. B. MOTIVES/EXISTENTIAL

4.3.7.3. C. CIRCUMSTANCES/CONTEXT

4.4. B. A CHRISTIAN NORMATIVE ETHIC

4.4.1. 1. SYSTEMS IN CHRISTIAN ETHICS

4.4.1.1. 1. EGOISTIC

4.4.1.1.1. A. PSYCHOLOGICAL EGOISTIC

4.4.1.1.2. B. ETHICAL EGOISTIC

4.4.1.1.3. C. TWO FURTHER TYPES

4.4.1.2. 2. UTILITARIAN

4.4.1.2.1. A. ACT UTILITARIANISM

4.4.1.2.2. B. RULE UTILITARIANISM

4.4.1.3. 3. DEONTOLOGY

4.4.1.3.1. A. DUTY

4.4.1.3.2. B. 1CI: UNIVERSALIZATION

4.4.1.3.3. C. 2CI: RESPECT FOR EPRSONS

4.4.1.4. 4. VIRTUE (ARETAIC)

4.4.1.4.1. A. THE IDEAL TYPE

4.4.1.4.2. B. THE IDEAL INDIVIDUAL

4.4.1.5. 5. TRISPECTIVAL

4.4.1.5.1. A. NORMS/PRINCIPLES

4.4.1.5.2. B. MOTIVES/EXISTENTIAL

4.4.1.5.3. C. CIRCUMSTANCES/CONTEXT

4.4.2. 2. HISTORY OF CHRISTIAN ETHICS

4.4.2.1. 1. THE OLD TESTAMENT ERA

4.4.2.2. 2. THE NEW TESTAMENT ERA

4.4.2.3. 3. THE EARLY CHURCH FATHERS

4.4.2.4. 4. THE LATER CHURCH FATHERS

4.4.2.5. 5. THE MEDIEVAL CHURCH & SCHOLASTICISM

4.4.2.6. 6. THE REFORMATION

4.4.2.7. 7. THE AGE OF REASON

4.4.2.8. 8. THE MODERN CHURCH

4.4.2.9. 9. THE POST-MODERN CHURCH

4.4.2.10. BEACH & NIEBUHR CHRISTIAN ETHICS

4.4.2.10.1. 1. EARLY CHRISTIAN CHURCH

4.4.2.10.2. 2. CLEMENT OF ALEXANDRIA

4.4.2.10.3. 3. ST. AUGUSTINE

4.4.2.10.4. 4. ETHICS OF MONASTICISM

4.4.2.10.5. 6. ETHICS OF MYSTICISM

4.4.2.10.6. 7. THOMAS AQUINAS AND SCHOLASTICISM

4.4.2.10.7. 8. MARTIN LUTHER (REFORMATION ETHICS)

4.4.2.10.8. 9. JOHN CALVIN (REFORMATION ETHICS)

4.4.2.10.9. 10. ETHICS OF PURITANISM AND QUAKERISM

4.4.2.10.10. 11. JOSEPH BUTLER AND ANGLICAN RATIONALISM

4.4.2.10.11. 12. JOHN WESLEY

4.4.2.10.12. 13. JONATHAN EDWARDS

4.4.2.10.13. 14. SOREN KIERKEGAARD

4.4.2.10.14. 15. SOCIAL GOSPEL (WALTER RAUSCHENBUSCH, FLETCHER, GUITIERREZ)

4.4.2.10.15. 16. EUROPEAN NEOORTHODOXY (KARL BARTH, BONHOEFFER)

4.4.2.10.16. 17. AMERICAN NEO-ORTHODOXY (R. NIEBUHR, H. R. NIEBUHR)

4.4.2.10.17. 18. REFORMED PERSPECTIVE (VAN TIL, MURRAY)

4.4.2.10.18. 19. EVANGELICAL FOUNDATIONS (HENRY, LEWIS)

4.4.3. 3. THINKERS IN CHRISTIAN ETHICS

4.4.3.1. 1. AUGUSTINE OF HIPPO

4.4.3.2. 2. THOMAS AQUINAS

4.4.3.3. 3. REINHOLD NIEBUHR

4.4.3.4. 4. JONATHAN EDWARDS

4.4.3.5. 5. MARTIN LUTHER

4.4.3.6. 6. JOHN FRAME

4.4.3.7. 7. JOHN CALVIN

4.4.3.8. 8. JOHN WESLEY

4.4.3.9. 9. CARL F. H. HENRY

4.4.3.10. 10. JOHN OWEN

4.4.3.11. 11. WALTER RAUSCHENBUSCH

4.4.3.12. 12. MENNO SIMMONS

4.4.3.13. 13. OLIVER O'DONOVAN

4.4.3.14. 14. JOSEPH BUTLER

4.4.3.15. 15. H. RICHARD NIEBUHR

4.4.3.16. 16. JOHN MILBANK

4.4.3.17. 17. FRANCIS SCHAEFFER

4.4.3.18. 18. CARL BARTH

4.4.3.19. 19. DIETRICH BONHOFFER

4.4.3.20. 20. HUGO GROTIUS

4.4.3.21. 21. SOREN KIERKEGAARD

4.4.3.22. 22. STANLEY HAUERWAS

4.4.3.23. 23. EMIL BRUNNER

4.4.3.24. 24. N. T. WRIGHT

4.5. C. A CHRISTIAN APPLIED ETHIC

4.5.1. 1ST COMMANDMENT: NO OTHER GODS

4.5.1.1. Love

4.5.1.2. Worship

4.5.1.3. Consecration

4.5.1.4. Sepeparation

4.5.1.5. The Occult

4.5.1.6. Secret Societies

4.5.1.7. False Religions

4.5.1.8. Secularism

4.5.1.9. PHILOSOPHICAL ETHICS

4.5.2. 2ND COMMANDMENT: PROHIBITED IMAGES, WORSHIP

4.5.2.1. Images

4.5.2.2. Regulative Principle

4.5.2.3. Worship

4.5.2.4. MINISTERIAL ETHICS

4.5.3. 3RD COMMANDMENT: GOD'S NAME

4.5.3.1. Name of the Lord

4.5.3.2. Bearers of God's Name

4.5.3.3. Vanity

4.5.3.4. Sanction

4.5.3.5. Oaths and Vows

4.5.3.6. Oaths and Sin

4.5.3.7. Confession

4.5.3.8. Blessing

4.5.3.9. Humor

4.5.3.10. Profanity

4.5.3.11. Slang

4.5.3.12. Language

4.5.4. 4TH COMMANDMENT: SABBATH KEEPING

4.5.4.1. Work

4.5.4.2. Rest

4.5.4.3. Recreation

4.5.4.4. Works of Mercy, Necessity

4.5.4.5. Worship

4.5.5. 5TH COMMANDMENT: AUTHORITIES, GENDER, RACE

4.5.5.1. Honoring Authorities

4.5.5.2. Father and Mother

4.5.5.3. Prosperity

4.5.5.4. The Family

4.5.5.5. The Church

4.5.5.6. The State

4.5.5.7. Civil Disobedience

4.5.5.8. Revolution

4.5.5.9. Man & Woman

4.5.5.10. The NAtions

4.5.5.11. Race

4.5.5.12. Slavery

4.5.5.13. Prejudice

4.5.5.14. POLITICAL ETHICS

4.5.5.15. RELATIONAL ETHICS (RACE, ETHNICITY)

4.5.5.16. SOCIAL ETHICS (MARRIAGE, FAMILY, STATE, SOCIETY)

4.5.6. 6TH COMMANDMENT: LIFE, WAR, PUNISHMENT

4.5.6.1. Love

4.5.6.2. Vengeance

4.5.6.3. Self-Defense

4.5.6.4. Punishment

4.5.6.5. Prison

4.5.6.6. Capital Punishment

4.5.6.7. War

4.5.6.8. Pacifism

4.5.6.9. Just War Theory

4.5.6.10. Nuclear War & Deterrence

4.5.6.11. Abortion

4.5.6.12. Death

4.5.6.13. Killing and Letting Die

4.5.6.14. Care for the Sick and Injured

4.5.6.15. Euthanasia

4.5.6.16. Suicide

4.5.6.17. Health and Safety

4.5.6.18. Environment

4.5.6.19. BIOMEDICAL ETHICS

4.5.6.20. ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS

4.5.7. 7TH COMMANDMENT: SEX, MARRIAGE, DIVORCE

4.5.7.1. Marriage

4.5.7.2. Polygamy

4.5.7.3. Prostitution

4.5.7.4. Homosexuality

4.5.7.5. Incest

4.5.7.6. Pedophilia

4.5.7.7. Fornification

4.5.7.8. Lust

4.5.7.9. Divorce

4.5.7.10. Remarriage

4.5.7.11. Birth Control

4.5.7.12. New Reproduction

4.5.7.13. Genetic Manipulation

4.5.7.14. Stem Cells

4.5.7.15. Cloning

4.5.7.16. SEXUAL ETHICS

4.5.8. 8TH COMMANDMENT: PROPERTY

4.5.8.1. Private Property

4.5.8.2. Work Ethic

4.5.8.3. Tithing

4.5.8.4. Taxation

4.5.8.5. Boycotts

4.5.8.6. Financial Responsibility

4.5.8.7. Gambling

4.5.8.8. Wealth

4.5.8.9. Poverty in the Covenant Community

4.5.8.10. World Poverty

4.5.8.11. Economic Systems

4.5.8.12. Homelessness

4.5.8.13. ECONOMICAL/WEALTH ETHICS

4.5.9. 9TH COMMANDMENT: TRUTHFULNESS

4.5.9.1. Lying

4.5.9.2. Truthtelling

4.5.9.3. Reputations

4.5.10. 10TH COMMANDMENT: DESIRES OF THE HEART

4.5.10.1. Coveting

4.6. D. A CHRISTIAN DESCRIPTIVE ETHIC

4.6.1. Barna studies

5. V. OUTLINE OF A PARTICULAR ETHICAL FIELD: POLITICAL ETHICS

5.1. WWW.PROTESTANTETHICS.COM

5.2. DEGREE: PHD (THEOLOGICAL STUDIES IN CHRISTIAN ETHICS; SEBTS)

5.3. A. INTRODUCTION POLITICAL "ETHICS"

5.3.1. 1. INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL "ETHICS"

5.3.2. 2. INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY

5.3.3. 3. INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL THEOLOGY

5.4. B. HISTORY OF POLITICAL "ETHICS"

5.4.1. 1. HISTORY OF POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY

5.4.2. 2. HISTORY OF POLITICAL THEOLOGY

5.5. C. FIGURES OF POLITICAL "ETHICS"

5.5.1. 1. FIGURES OF POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY

5.5.2. 2. FIGURES OF POLITICAL THEOLOGY

5.6. D. PROBLEMS IN POLITICAL "ETHICS"

5.6.1. MAIN QUESTION: The Problem of the Dirty Hands. Should political leaders violate the deepest constraints of morality in order to achieve great goods or avoid disasters for their communities?

5.6.1.1. http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/dirty-hands/

5.6.1.2. "according to which political and military leaders may sometimes find themselves in situations where they cannot avoid acting immorally, even when that means deliberately killing the innocent.” (Walzer)

5.6.1.3. “…dirty hands aren't permissible (or necessary) when anything less than the ongoingness of the community is at stake, or when the danger that we face is anything less than communal death” (Walzer 2004a, 46)

5.6.2. 1. ETHICS OF PROCESS

5.6.2.1. A) THE POLITICAL ORIGIN

5.6.2.1.1. 1) CONQUEST

5.6.2.1.2. 2) ORGANIC

5.6.2.1.3. 3) COVENANT

5.6.2.1.4. 4) CONTRACT

5.6.2.2. B) THE POLITICAL CONSTITUTION

5.6.2.2.1. 1) POWERS

5.6.2.2.2. 2) GOVERNMENT

5.6.2.2.3. 3) SOVEREIGNTY

5.6.2.2.4. 4) LEGITIMACY

5.6.2.2.5. 5) AUTHORITY

5.6.2.2.6. 6) REPRESENTATION

5.6.2.2.7. 7) LAW

5.6.2.2.8. 8) JUSTICE

5.6.2.2.9. 9) INTERNATIONAL

5.6.2.3. C) LIFE BEYOND THE POLITICAL POWERS

5.6.2.3.1. 1) CHURCH

5.6.2.3.2. 2) FAMILY

5.6.2.3.3. 3) STATE

5.6.2.3.4. 4) ECONOMY

5.6.3. 2. ETHICS OF POLICY

5.6.3.1. A) LIFE

5.6.3.2. B) MARRIAGE

5.6.3.3. C) FAMILY

5.6.3.4. D) ECONOMICS

5.6.3.5. E) ENVIRONMENT

5.6.3.6. G) NATIONAL DEFENSE

5.6.3.7. H) FOREIGN POLICY

5.6.3.8. I) FREEDOM OF SPEECH

5.6.3.9. J) FREEDOM OF RELIGION

5.6.3.10. K) SPECIAL GROUPS

5.6.3.11. L) EDUCATION

5.6.3.12. M) LAW

5.6.3.13. N) LIBERTY

5.7. E. MODEL FOR POLITICAL "ETHICS"

5.7.1. PRISMATIC COVENANTAL CONSTITUIONALISM

6. VI. OUTLINE OF A PARTICULAR THEOLOGICAL DOCTRINE: INDIVIDUAL & COMMUNITY

6.1. WWW.PROTESTANTETHICS.COM

6.2. DEGREE: PHD (THEOLOGICAL STUDIES IN CHRISTIAN ETHICS; SEBTS)

6.3. I. HISTORICAL SURVEY: CONCEPT OF THE INDIVIDUAL & COMMUNITY IN HISTORY

6.3.1. A. INDIVIDUAL & COMMUNITY IN HISTORY

6.3.2. B. INDIVIDUAL & COMMUNITY IN PSYCHOLOGY

6.3.3. C. INDIVIDUAL & COMMUNITY IN POLITICS

6.3.4. D. INDIVIDUAL & COMMUNITY IN THEOLOGY

6.4. II. BIBLICAL SURVEY: CONCEPT OF THE INDIVIDUAL & COMMUNITY IN THE BIBLE

6.4.1. A. OLD TESTAMENT

6.4.2. B. NEW TESTAMENT

6.4.3. C. PAULINE STUDIES

6.5. III. MORAL THEOLOGICAL PROBLEMS: ISSUES IN THE CONCEPT OF THE INDIVIDUAL & COMMUNITY

6.5.1. A. CENTRAL PROBELM: RIGHTS OF INDIVIDUAL VS. COMMUNITY

6.5.2. B. AUTHORITY

6.5.3. C. RIGHTS

6.5.4. D. DISCIPLINE

6.5.5. E. FREEDOM

6.6. IV. MORAL THEOLOGICAL RESPONSE: A COVENANTAL-CONSTITUTIONAL APPRAISAL OF THE INDIVIDUAL & COMMUNITY

6.6.1. A. ANTHROPOLOGICAL

6.6.2. B. ECCLESIOLOGICAL

6.6.3. C. SOCIETAL

6.6.4. D. POLITICAL-ETHICAL

6.6.5. E. THEOLOGICAL

7. VII. OUTLINE OF A PARTICULAR CHRISTIAN ETHICIST: OLIVER O'DONOVAN

7.1. WWW.PROTESTANTETHICS.COM

7.2. DEGREE: PHD (THEOLOGICAL STUDIES IN CHRISTIAN ETHICS; SEBTS)

7.3. A. MAJOR WORKS

7.3.1. Resurrection and Moral Order (1986)

7.3.2. The Desire of the Nations

7.3.3. The Ways of Judgment

7.4. B. BOOKS

7.4.1. Self, World, and Time: Volume 1: Ethics as Theology: An Induction (Eerdmans 2013) ISBN 0-8028-6921-1[6]

7.4.2. The Word in Small Boats: Sermons from Oxford (Eerdmans 2010) ISBN 0-8028-6453-8

7.4.3. A Conversation Waiting to Begin: The Churches and the Gay Controversy (SCM 2009) ISBN 0-334-04210-0

7.4.4. Church in crisis: The gay controversy and the Anglican Communion. (Eugene, Or: Cascade Books. 2008) ISBN 1556358970

7.4.5. The Ways of Judgment (Eerdmans 2005) ISBN 0-8028-2920-1

7.4.6. The Just War Revisited (CUP 2003) ISBN 0-5215-3899-8

7.4.7. Common Objects of Love (Eerdmans 2002) ISBN 0-8028-6349-3

7.4.8. The Desire of the Nations (CUP 1996) ISBN 0-521-66516-7

7.4.9. New Dictionary of Christian Ethics & Pastoral Theology (co-edited) (IVP Academic, 1995) ISBN 0-8308-1408-6

7.4.10. Peace and Certainty (Eerdmans 1989) ISBN 0-8028-0414-4

7.4.11. Resurrection and Moral Order (IVP 1986, 2nd ed IVP/Eerdmans 1994) ISBN 0-8028-0692-9

7.4.12. On the Thirty-Nine Articles (Paternoster 1986 and SCM 2011) ISBN 0-3340-4398-0

7.4.13. Begotten or Made? (OUP 1984) ISBN 0-1982-6678-2

7.4.14. Principles in the public realm: The dilemma of Christian moral witness. (Oxford 1984) [Oxfordshire: Clarendon Press.] ISBN 0-19-951539-5

7.4.15. The Problem of Self-Love in Saint Augustine (Yale 1979) ISBN 0-300-02468-1

7.4.16. Liturgy and Ethics (1993)

7.5. C. BOOKLETS

7.5.1. Transsexualism and the Christian Marriage. (Bramcote: Grove Books. 1982) ISBN 0907536336

7.5.2. Marriage and permanence. (Bramcote: Grove Books. 1978) ISBN 0905422473

7.5.3. In pursuit of a Christian view of war. (Bramcote: Grove Books. 1977) ISBN 090542204X

7.5.4. Measure for measure: Justice in punishment and the sentence of death. (Bramcote: Grove Books. 1977) ISBN 0905422228

7.5.5. The Christian and the unborn child. (Bramcote, Notts: Grove Books. 1975) ISBN 1851740228

7.6. D. SOURCEBOOKS

7.6.1. From Irenaeus to Grotius: A Sourcebook in Christian Political Thought edited with Joan Lockwood O'Donovan (Eerdmans 1999) ISBN 0-8028-4209-7

7.7. E. ESSAYS AND ARTICLES

7.7.1. "Prayer and Morality in the Sermon on the Mount" Studies in Christian Ethics 22.1 (2009): 21–33.

7.7.2. "Judgment, Tradition and Reason: A Response" Political Theology 9.3 (2008): 395–414. This is from a Special Issue of Political Theology on The Ways of Judgment.

7.7.3. Bonds of Imperfection: Christian politics past and present, edited collection with Joan Lockwood O'Donovan (Eerdmans 2004) ISBN 0-8028-4975-X

7.7.4. A Royal Priesthood? A dialogue with Oliver O'Donovan ed. Craig Batholomew et al. (Paternoster 2002). O'Donovan provides a short response to every paper in this edited collection.

7.7.5. "Government as Judgment", First Things: A Monthly Journal of Religion and Public Life, April 1999, p.36(1)[7]

7.7.6. "How Can Theology Be Moral?" Journal of Religious Ethics 17, no. 2 (Fall 1989), 81–94.

7.7.7. "The Natural Ethic" in Essays in Evangelical Social Ethics ed. David F. Wright (Paternoster, 1978) ISBN 0-85364-290-7

7.7.8. "Prides Progress." in Christian Ethics. Feb2015, Vol. 28 Issue 1, p59-69. 11p. DOI: 10.1177/0953946814555445.

7.8. E. JOURNAL ARTICLES

7.8.1. O'Donovan, Oliver. "A Theology of Public Life." Political Theology 12, no. 4 (October 2011): 616-620. Academic Search Premier, EBSCOhost (accessed September 3, 2015). O’Donovan, Oliver. "Book Review: Church of Scotland, Theological Commission on Same-Sex Relationships and the Ministry and Church of England, Report of the House of Bishops Working Group on Human Sexuality (The Pilling Report)." Studies In Christian Ethics 27, no. 3 (August 2014): 344-350. Academic Search Premier, EBSCOhost (accessed September 3, 2015). O’Donovan, Oliver. "Book Review: Duncan B. Forrester, Forrester on Christian Ethics and Practical Theology: Collected Writings on Christianity, India, and the Social Order." Studies In Christian Ethics 27, no. 1 (February 2014): 95-98. Academic Search Premier, EBSCOhost (accessed September 3, 2015). O'Donovan, Oliver. "DE IMPERIO SUMMARUM POTESTATUM CIRCA SACRA (Book)." Theological Studies 64, no. 3 (September 2003): 627-630. Academic Search Premier, EBSCOhost (accessed September 3, 2015). O’Donovan, Oliver. "Ethics and Politics: Selected Essays, Volume 2." Studies In Christian Ethics 21, no. 2 (August 2008): 306-311. Academic Search Premier, EBSCOhost (accessed September 3, 2015). O'Donovan, Oliver. "Faith before Hope and Love." New Blackfriars 95, no. 1056 (March 2014): 177-189. Academic Search Premier, EBSCOhost (accessed September 3, 2015). O'Donovan, Oliver. "Friendship and Society (Book)." Journal Of Theological Studies 52, no. 1 (April 2001): 518. Academic Search Premier, EBSCOhost (accessed September 3, 2015). O'Donovan, Oliver. "Government as Judgment." First Things: A Monthly Journal Of Religion & Public Life no. 92 (April 1999): 36-44. Academic Search Premier, EBSCOhost (accessed September 3, 2015). O'Donovan, Oliver. "Hospitality and Holiness." Political Theology 10, no. 1 (January 2009): 187-189. Academic Search Premier, EBSCOhost (accessed September 3, 2015). O'Donovan, Oliver. "HOW CAN THEOLOGY BE MORAL?." Journal Of Religious Ethics 17, no. 2 (Fall89 1989): 81. Academic Search Premier, EBSCOhost (accessed September 3, 2015). O'Donovan, Oliver. "JUDGMENT, TRADITION AND REASON: A RESPONSE." Political Theology 9, no. 3 (July 2008): 395-414. Academic Search Premier, EBSCOhost (accessed September 3, 2015). O'Donovan, Oliver. "KARL BARTH AND RAMSEY'S 'USES OF POWER'." Journal Of Religious Ethics 19, no. 2 (Fall91 1991): 1. Academic Search Premier, EBSCOhost (accessed September 3, 2015). O'Donovan, Oliver. "Kierkegaard (Book)." Studies In Christian Ethics 16, no. 1 (April 2003): 105. Academic Search Premier, EBSCOhost (accessed September 3, 2015). O'Donovan, Oliver. "O'Donovan's The Ways of Judgment." Ecclesiology 5, no. 1 (January 2009): 82-94. Academic Search Premier, EBSCOhost (accessed September 3, 2015). O'Donovan, Oliver. "ONTOPOLITICAL CONVERSATIONS." Expository Times 119, no. 6 (March 2008): 307-308. Academic Search Premier, EBSCOhost (accessed September 3, 2015). O'Donovan, Oliver. "PRAYER AND MORALITY IN THE SERMON ON THE MOUNT." Studies In Christian Ethics 22, no. 1 (February 2009): 21-33. Academic Search Premier, EBSCOhost (accessed September 3, 2015). O’Donovan, Oliver. "Pride’s Progress." Studies In Christian Ethics 28, no. 1 (February 2015): 59-69. Academic Search Premier, EBSCOhost (accessed September 3, 2015). O'Donovan, Oliver. "Public Theology and the Missiological Task." Ecclesiology 2, no. 2 (January 2006): 213-219. Academic Search Premier, EBSCOhost (accessed September 3, 2015). O'Donovan, Oliver. "Reviews." Journal Of Theological Studies 48, no. 2 (October 1997): 763. Academic Search Premier, EBSCOhost (accessed September 3, 2015). Williams, Stephen N., et al. "Reviews." International Journal Of Systematic Theology 2, no. 3 (November 2000): Academic Search Premier, EBSCOhost (accessed September 3, 2015). Loades, Ann, et al. "REVIEWS." Modern Theology 21, no. 3 (July 2005): 511-537. Academic Search Premier, EBSCOhost (accessed September 3, 2015). O’Donovan, Oliver. "The Future of Theological Ethics." Studies In Christian Ethics 25, no. 2 (May 2012): 186-198. Academic Search Premier, EBSCOhost (accessed September 3, 2015). O'Donovan, Oliver. "THE LANGUAGE OF RIGHTS AND CONCEPTUAL HISTORY." Journal Of Religious Ethics 37, no. 2 (June 2009): 193-207. Academic Search Premier, EBSCOhost (accessed September 3, 2015). O'Donovan, Oliver. "The Mystical as Political: Democracy and Non-radical Orthodoxy." International Journal For The Study Of The Christian Church 13, no. 1 (February 2013): 75-77. Academic Search Premier, EBSCOhost (accessed September 3, 2015). O'Donovan, Oliver. "THE OBJECT OF THEOLOGICAL ETHICS." Studies In Christian Ethics 20, no. 2 (August 2007): 203-214. Academic Search Premier, EBSCOhost (accessed September 3, 2015). O'Donovan, Oliver. "The Oxford Handbook of Theological Ethics." Studies In Christian Ethics 20, no. 3 (December 2007): 429-435. Academic Search Premier, EBSCOhost (accessed September 3, 2015). O'Donovan, Oliver. "THE PATH." American Journal Of Jurisprudence 56, (January 2011): 1-16. Academic Search Premier, EBSCOhost (accessed September 3, 2015). O'Donovan, Oliver. "The Republic of Grace: Augustinian Thoughts for Dark Times." Augustinian Studies 42, no. 1 (January 2011): 129-131. Academic Search Premier, EBSCOhost (accessed September 3, 2015). O'Donovan, Oliver. "TRANSSEXUALISM AND CHRISTIAN MARRIAGE." Journal Of Religious Ethics 11, no. 1 (Spring83 1983): 135. Academic Search Premier, EBSCOhost (accessed September 3, 2015). O'Donovan, Oliver. "What Kind of Community is the Church?." Ecclesiology 3, no. 2 (January 2007): 171-193. Academic Search Premier, EBSCOhost (accessed September 3, 2015). O'DONOVAN, OLIVER. "What shall we do?." Tls no. 5831 (January 2, 2015): 24. Academic Search Premier, EBSCOhost (accessed September 3, 2015).

7.9. F. CRITICISMS/REVIEWS OF O'DONOVAN

8. VIII. DISSERTATION: COVENANT AND CONSTITUTION

8.1. WWW.POLITICALTHEOLOGY.ORG

8.2. DISSERTATION: COVENANT AND CONSTITUTION: AN APPRAISAL OF COVENANT AS AN ECCLESIAL, MARITAL, AND POLITICAL IDEA

8.2.1. AWARDING INSTITUTION: SOUTHEASTERN BAPTIST THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY

8.2.2. THESIS: This dissertation will argue the thesis that O’Donovan’s criticism of traditional Protestant social theory is not warranted because applying the idea of covenant to social life is both scripturally and doctrinally supported, and better able to address the problem of particularity and universality.

8.2.3. DISSERTATION CHAIR, MENTOR, AND READER: DR. DANIEL HEIMBACH (SEBTS)

8.2.4. DISSERTATION READER: DR. DAVD JONES (SEBTS)

8.2.5. DISSERTATION EXTERNAL READER: DR. RICHARD LAND (SES; FORMER ERLC PRESIDENT)

9. PREAMBLE: ACADEMIC STRATEGY

9.1. STRATEGY: I would like to prepare for my comprehensive exam by using this time to review, in reason of course, comprehensive human knowledge. I take this to mean a review of the building blocks of knowledge. I have had to set certain foundations of knowledge in order to arrive at this point in my PhD exam, and much of what I have learned at a doctoral level has presupposed foundational points learned earlier. As such, I would like the ability to zero in on the unfolding of my discipline. I would like a way to properly orient and contextualize exactly where it is I will be contributing to the wider framework of human knowledge. The comprehensive exam is designed to test my comprehensive knowledge in my discipline area (Theological Studies in Christian Ethics). It is intentionally designed to be broader in scope than what I will actually do in my dissertation. As such, it touches on a broad historical survey of the field of Christian Ethics, and then proceeds to dig slightly deeper into that field by examining me on my ability to develop a particular problem/approach area in that field, a particular doctrine in theology, and a particular Christian thinker who demonstrates major contributions in both. After my comprehensive exam demonstrates this horizontal/broad knowledge, I will then dive into the vertical, by approaching a very particular question in the discipline, and advancing it as much as possible. As mentioned earlier, the PhD comprehensive exam and dissertation both presuppose a large noetic network of ideas I learned in my earlier years. Given the trajectory of the Comprehensive exam (General Christian Ethics --> Particular Ethical Area, Particular Doctrine, Particular Christian Thinker), and the dissertation (General Christian Ethical Questions --> Particular Question --> Particular Answer -- Particular Application), I think ti advantageous to have a very brief survey of the scope of knowledge where this particular puzzle piece becomes oriented. It is helpful to summarize it along academic degrees/levels.

10. PREAMBLE: EARLY EDUCATION

10.1. EDUCATION: GOENAGA FAMILY, MIAMI FL

10.2. EARLY EDUCATION (PRESCHOOL): This occurred around the age of 4, and consisted of early childhood education (Preschool). It was primarily an extension of learning through play and imitation in my home environment, but differed in that the educator was no longer a familial relation, and the environment was more structured. During these years, I developed the most basic physical, social, emotional, linguistic, and cognitive skills. Through play and imitation, I learned through discovery. I developed physical skills such as my eyesight, motorskills, and handeye coordination. Through interacting with other children, I learned basic social engagement and customs. Through relating with other people and sharing in feelings, I learned emotional connections and self-confidence. Through communicating with others, I learned basic grammatical constructions and extended vocabulary. Finally, through processing these four developmental domains, I gained cognitive skills as I was forced to organize information, solve problems, memorize data, create solutions, and fill absences of my knowledge with my imagination. The imagination also fed the investigation into new acquisitions of knowledge, as I fabricated questions and answers, and then verified whether these imaginate cases cohered to reality.

11. PREAMBLE: PRIMARY EDUCATION (ELEMENTARY SCHOOL)

11.1. EDUCATION: EMERSON ELEMENTARY, MIAMI FL; SOUTH MIAMI ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (MAGNET), MIAMI FL

11.2. PRIMARY EDUCATION (ELEMENTARY SCHOOL): This occurred between the ages of 5 and 11. It consisted of elementary school. Teh beginning of primary school focused on developing basic academic learning and socialization skills. In addition, it began to introduce me to the broad range of knowledge, skills, and behaviors needed to succeed in later education and life. In particular, it developed fundamental areas of knowledge. It continued my early education's development of physical skills by providing physical education that maintained a healthy physicality conducive to learning. It developed my socialization beyond simply familial and peer-based relations, by also introducing me to social sciences, and with it the wider framework of social existence/knowledge (basic authority figures, basic historical and environmental contexts, etc). It developed my proficiency in communications by introducing me to proper English grammar, spelling, reading, and vocabulary. It developed my cognitive skills by introducing me to right/logical thinking, such as is present in arithmetic and mathematical problem solving. Finally, it developed my emotional and self-awareness by introducing me to fields that focused on self-expression and self-awareness: such as art, music, and recreation.

12. PREAMBLE: SECONDARY EDUCATION (MIDDLE SCHOOL & HIGHSCHOOL)

12.1. EDUCATION: SOUTH MIAMI MIDDLE SCHOOL (MAGNET), MIAMI FL

12.2. EDUCATION: SOUTH MIAMI HIGH SCHOOL, MIAMI FL

12.3. SECONDARY EDUCATION (MIDDLE SCHOOL & HIGHSCHOOL): This occurred between the ages of 11-14 (Middle School), and 14-18 (High School). It continued to develop basic skills in a number of disciplines, but differed from elementary in the class structure. Instead of spending most of the time with a single teacher, we were given more freedom by having class selections, moving between different teachers for different classes, and even picking electives. Courses in language arts, science, mathetics, history, and social sciences were continued, with the addition of electives (and in my case, magnet arts in photography). The Highschool portion began to focus more on academic development in preparation for the collegiate environment, and testing and other courses usually had this as a focus.

13. PREAMBLE: POST-SECONDARY EDUCATION (UNDERGRADUATE SCHOOL)

13.1. EDUCATION: MIAMI DADE COLLEGE (ASSOCIATES OF THE ARTS), MIAMI FL

13.2. EDUCATION: FLORIDA INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY (BACHELOR OF THE ARTS), MIAMI FL

13.3. EDUCATION: FLORIDA INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY (SECOND BACHELOR OF THE ARTS), MIAMI FL

13.4. POST-SECONDARY EDUCATION (UNDERGRADUATE SCHOOL): At this academic level, I began a formal introduction to the wider world of academia. My undergraduate degrees were designed to do two things: (1) They they were designed in their first two years to introduce me to a number of important disciplines, which included introductory courses in the humanities, social sciences, natural sciences, and formal sciences. The second two years then consisted of courses that explored in greater depth subject areas in these disciplines, and these formed my degree's concentrations. I chose Religious Studies and Political Science as dual B.A. degrees, and spend the last two years of my undergraduate education moving beyond introductions within these areas. These areas were explored in greather depth, such as introducing me to their sub-disciplines. I then further refined my focus by choosing some of these sub-disciplines, such as political theory, and Christian studies, which were the informal choice of certain types of courses I took. At this point, I had developed basic skills in my early education that were developed in an academic environment in my primary education. I then took those skills into my secondary education, which began a formal development along subjects. My post-secondary undergraduate education then introduced me to the numerous academic disciplines, and I chose two in particular to further explore their sub-disciplines, and chose certain sub-disciplines to develop and expertise in.

14. PREAMBLE: GRADUATE EDUCATION

14.1. EDUCATION: SOUTHEASTERN BAPTIST THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY (MASTER OF DIVINITY), WAKE FOREST NC

14.2. GRADUATE EDUCATION: My collegiate experience helped me develop a framework of knowledge that surveyed the wider academic disciplines, how they all fit together, and where my particular disciplines existed. My graduate experience then sough to develop my academic discipline within a more profession-focused area. Along the academic disciplines, my undergraduate degrees explored disciplines in the areas of humanities (religion), and social sciences (political science). My undergraduate degree then focused on a professions discipline, which was divinity. THis M.Div. degree area is usuallybroken down into the disciplines of Canon Law, Church History, Field Ministry, Scriptural Study & Languages, and Theology (which further break down into sub-disciiplines). Within Theology was found my particular sub-discipline, which was Christian Ethics. The M.Div. degree was designed to provide introductions to all of these subdisciplines, and a particular expertise in my subdiscipline of Christian ethics.

15. PREAMBLE: POST-GRADUATE EDUCATION

15.1. EDUCATION: SOUTHEASTERN BAPTIST THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY (DOCTORATE IN PHILOSOPHY), WAKE FOREST NC

15.2. POST-GRADUATE EDUCATION: After being introduced to the professional discipline of Divinity, introduced to its numerous sub-disciplines, and developing expertise in a particualr sub discipline (Christian Ethics), I decided to further my knowledge to the highest academic level in this sub-discipline. In the PhD program, I explored Theological Studies in Christian Ethics to it's furthest levels, which helped me learn the type of arguments, discussions, and questions asked in depth within the discipline. I even began to choose a formal question within the discipline to contribute to, and this focused on political theology. Seminars in Theology and Ethics courses helped me develop my thoughts in these areas, and begin to find a dissertation topic. At the comprehensive exam level, I am now tasked with proving the comprehensive knowledge gained on the subjects of theology and ethics. In particular, the exam is designed to show my master over the broad subdiscipline of Christian ethics by historically surveying its major figures, questions, and proposals. After evidencing a mastery over this swath of experience, I am then to prove proficiency as a thinker by diving even deeper into that matrix. I am then asked to zoom from general introduction to Christian Ethics and its questions, and towards a particular approach in Christian Ehtics (in this case, political ethics). I am tasked with showing an ability to master a specific problem/approach area, by surveying the general approaches within the field, and then how my Christian ethics provides a response. Afterwards, I am to show this same mastery over a particular theological doctrine (individual and community), performing the same action as with the particular ethical question, but here focusing on a theological doctrine (and how it influences a Christian ethical approach). Finally, I am to pick a particular person (Oliver O'Donovan), and how a figure much more advanced than myself, addressed question of Christian ethics throughout his distinguished life. In this I acknowledge a dependence on my forebearers, but also the ability to master a specific thinker, and engage with him as a potential peer. In the dissertation stage, I then choose one specific question in a specific field, and whereas the comprehensive exam shows my horizontal comprehensive knowledge, my dissertation topic then shows my ability to participate as a peer in academia, by advancing a very specific/particular question past its current academic boundaries.

16. PREAMBLE: WORK AND LIFE

16.1. DR. GOENAGA’S RESUME: WWW.LEONARDGOENAGA.COM

16.2. DR. GOENAGA’S THE BARD COMPANY: WWW.THEBARDCOMPANY.COM

16.3. DR. GOENAGA’S LINKEDIN: WWW.LEONARDOGOENAGA.COM

16.4. DR. GOENAGA’S FACEBOOK: WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/LEONARDOOH

16.5. DR. GOENAGA’S FAMILY

16.5.1. WIFE: KATRINA LYNNE GOENAGA, MA, BA

16.5.2. DAUGHTER: CHARLOTTE ANN A GOENAGA

16.5.3. DAUGHTER: OLIVIA MARIE W GOENAGA

16.5.4. SON: LELAND JAMES E GOENAGA

16.5.5. SON: REAGAN LEIGH S GOENAGA

16.5.6. MOTHER: IRAIDA FRAGA GOENAGA

16.5.7. FATHER: RICARDO GOENAGA

16.5.8. SISTER: NADIA LYNN GOENAGA

16.5.9. BROTHER: RICARDO JR. GOENAGA