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STYLES OF PAINTING by Mind Map: STYLES OF PAINTING

1. Renaissance

1.1. Period immediately following the Middle Ages in Europe. 14-16 centuries. 1. A renewed interest in classical antiquity; 2. a rise in humanist philosophy (a belief in self, human worth, and individual dignity); 3. radical changes in ideas about religion, politics, and science.

1.2. NAMES OF ARTISTS

1.2.1. Leonardo da Vinci

1.2.1.1. Mona Lisa - Louvre,Paris

1.2.1.2. The Last Supper - Santa maria delle grazie, Milan

1.2.2. Michelangelo

1.2.2.1. The Sistine Chapel ceiling - Vatican museums

1.2.3. Raphael

1.2.3.1. Saint George and the Dragon- National Gallery of Art, Washington DC

1.2.3.2. Sistine Madonna- Old Masters Picture Gallery, Dresden State Art Museums

1.2.3.3. The Triumph of Galatea- the Villa Farnesina,Rome

1.2.4. Sandro Botticelli

1.2.4.1. The Birth of Venus - Uffizi Gallery, Florence

1.2.4.2. Primavera- Uffizi Gallery, Florence

1.2.4.3. Madonna del Padiglione-Pinacoteca Ambrosiana

1.2.5. Titian

1.2.5.1. Madonna del Padiglione-Pinacoteca Ambrosiana

1.2.5.2. Bacchus and Ariadne- The National Gallery, London

1.2.5.3. Assumption of the Virgin- Basilica di Santa Maria Gloriosa dei Frari

1.2.5.4. Louvre,Paris

2. Mannerism

2.1. Mannerist artists evolved a style that is characterized by artificiality and artiness, by a thoroughly self-conscious cultivation of elegance and technical facility, and by a sophisticated indulgence in the bizarre. The figures in Mannerist works frequently have graceful but queerly elongated limbs, small heads, and stylized facial features, while their poses seem difficult or contrived.

2.2. NAMES OF ARTISTS

2.2.1. Jacopo Pontormo

2.2.1.1. The Carmignano Visitation - Propositura dei Santi Michele e Francesco,Carmignano

2.2.1.2. Portrait of Alessandro de' Medici – Hermitage, Saint Petersburg

2.2.2. Parmigianino

2.2.2.1. Portrait of Camilla Gonzaga and Her Three Sons- Museum Prado, Madrid

2.2.2.2. Madonna with the Long Neck - Uffizi Gallery,Florence

2.2.2.3. Vision of Saint Jerome- The National Gallery, London

2.2.3. Jan Brueghel the Elder

2.2.3.1. A Fantastic Cave with Odysseus and Calypso - Johnny van Haeften Gallery, London

2.2.3.2. The Garden of Eden with the Fall of Man - Mauritshuis, The Hague

3. Baroque

3.1. Сharacterized by exaggerated motion and clear detail used to produce drama, exuberance, and grandeur. The development of this style was considered to be closely linked with the Catholic Church. The popularity of the Baroque style was encouraged by the Catholic Church, which had decided at the Council of Trent that the arts should communicate religious themes and direct emotional involvement in response to the Protestant Reformation.

3.2. NAMES OF ARTISTS

3.2.1. Caravaggio

3.2.1.1. Bacchus- Uffizi, Florence

3.2.1.2. Supper at Emmaus - National Gallery, London

3.2.1.3. Medusa - Uffizi, Florence

3.2.2. Rembrandt

3.2.2.1. The Night Watch – Rijksmuseum, Groningen

3.2.2.2. David and Uriah - Hermitage, St-Petersburg

3.2.2.3. Self-portrait- Louvre, Paris

3.2.3. Peter Paul Rubens

3.2.3.1. The Elevation of the Cross- Cathedral of Our Lady, Antwerp

3.2.3.2. The Rape of the Daughters of Leucippus- Alte Pinakothek, Munich

3.2.3.3. Assumption of the Virgin Mary- Cathedral of Our Lady, Antwerp

4. Rococo

4.1. 1. eternal youth and beauty 2. sophistication 3. grace 4. flight from reality

4.2. NAMES OF ARTISTS

4.2.1. François Boucher

4.2.1.1. The Bridge - Louvre Museum, France

4.2.2. Nicolas Lancret

4.2.2.1. Le Déjeuner de jambon - Condé Museum, France

4.2.3. Jean-Antoine Watteau

4.2.3.1. The Embarkation for Cythera - Louvre Museum, France

5. Classicism

5.1. 1. associated with the art of antiquity 2. canons stricts 3. rationalism

5.2. NAMES OF ARTISTS

5.2.1. Nicolas Poussin

5.2.1.1. The Martyrdom of Saint Erasmus - Pinacoteca, Vatican

5.2.2. Charles Le Brun

5.2.2.1. Venus Clipping Cupid’s Wings - Museo de Arte de Ponce, Ponce, Puerto Rico

5.2.3. Jacques-Louis David

5.2.3.1. Oath of the Horatii - Louvre Museum, France

6. Romantism

6.1. 1. cult of nature, feelings and natural in man 2. unity of man and nature 3. scientific rationalization of nature 4. historical plot

6.2. NAMES OF ARTISTS

6.2.1. Caspar David Friedrich

6.2.1.1. Wanderer above the Sea of Fog - Kunsthalle Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany

6.2.2. John William Waterhouse

6.2.2.1. The Magic Circle - Tate Britain, London

6.2.3. Eugène Delacroix

6.2.3.1. Liberty Leading the People - Louvre Museum, France

7. Realism

7.1. 1. objective reflection of reality 2. rebuttal of traditional value systems 3. stories from everyday life

7.2. NAMES OF ARTISTS

7.2.1. Jules Breton

7.2.1.1. The End of the Working Day - Brooklyn Museum, USA

7.2.2. Édouard Manet

7.2.2.1. The Cafe Concert - The Walters Art Museum, USA

7.2.3. Jean-François Millet

7.2.3.1. Woman Baking Bread - Kröller-Müller Museum, Otterlo

8. Impressionism

8.1. 1. beauty of everyday reality 2. live image accuracy 3. painting from nature

8.2. NAMES OF ARTISTS

8.2.1. Pierre-Auguste Renoir

8.2.1.1. Two Sisters - Art Institute of Chicago, USA

8.2.2. Edgar Degas

8.2.2.1. Dancers at The Bar - The Phillips Collection, Washington, USA

8.2.3. Claude Monet

8.2.3.1. The Cliff at Étretat after the Storm - Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, USA

9. Modernism

9.1. 1. striving for new things 2. conventions of style 3. continuous updating of art forms 4. abstract art

9.2. NAMES OF ARTISTS

9.2.1. Henri Matisse

9.2.1.1. Le bonheur de vivre - Barnes Foundation, Merion, USA

9.2.2. Egon Schiele

9.2.2.1. Portrait of Wally - Leopold Museum, Vienna

9.2.3. Gustav Klimt

9.2.3.1. The Kiss - Österreichische Galerie Belvedere, Vienna

10. Cubism

10.1. Cubism is based on the artist’s desire to decompose the depicted three-dimensional object into simple elements and assemble it on canvas in a two-dimensional image.

10.2. NAMES OF ARTISTS

10.2.1. Pablo Picasso

10.2.1.1. Girl with a Mandolin - Museum of Modern Art, USA

10.2.2. Albert Gleizes

10.2.2.1. Man on a Balcony (Portrait of Dr. Théo Morinaud)- Philadelphia Museum of Art,USA

10.2.3. Juan Gris

10.2.3.1. Portrait of Picasso - Art Institute of Chicago,USA

11. Expressionism

11.1. 1. expression of the emotional state of the author 2. subjectivity of the creative act 3. motives of pain and screaming

11.2. NAMES OF ARTISTS

11.2.1. Edvard Munch

11.2.1.1. The Scream - National Gallery of Norway

11.2.2. Irma Stern

11.2.2.1. Still life with African pot - Johans Borman Fine Art Gallery, Cape Town

11.2.3. Wassily Kandinsky

11.2.3.1. Akhtyrka - Lenbachhaus, Kunstarealm, Munich

12. Surrealism

12.1. 1. using allusions 2. paradoxical combinations of forms 3. combination of dream and reality 4. absurdity

12.2. NAMES OF ARTISTS

12.2.1. Salvador Dalí

12.2.1.1. Dream Caused by the Flight of a Bee Around a Pomegranate a Second Before Awakening - Thyssen-Bornemisza Museum, Madrid

12.2.2. Giorgio de Chirico

12.2.2.1. The Red Tower - Guggenheim Museum

12.2.3. René Magritte

12.2.3.1. The Treachery of Images - Los Angeles County Museum of Art, USA

13. Pop-art

13.1. The movement presented a challenge to traditions of fine art by including imagery from popular and mass culture, such as advertising, comic books and mundane mass-produced cultural objects. One of its aims is to use images of popular (as opposed to elitist) culture in art, emphasizing the banal or kitschy elements of any culture, most often through the use of irony

13.2. NAMES OF ARTISTS

13.2.1. Andy Warhol

13.2.1.1. Campbell's Tomato Juice Box - Museum of Modern Art, New York City,USA

13.2.2. Roy Lichtenstein

13.2.2.1. Drowning Girl- Museum of Modern Art, New York City, USA

13.2.3. Marcel Duchamp

13.2.3.1. The Large Glass - Philadelphia Museum of Art Collection, USA