With reference to a major Internet business, address the question,"What is the fundamental basis ...

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With reference to a major Internet business, address the question,"What is the fundamental basis of Internet commerce?" by Mind Map: With reference to a major Internet business, address the question,"What is the fundamental basis of Internet commerce?"

1. Major Internet Business

1.1. Google

1.2. Ebay

1.3. Facebook

1.4. iTunes

1.5. PayPal

1.6. YouTube

1.7. Twitter

1.8. Amazon.com

1.8.1. Business Model

1.8.1.1. Brokerage Model

1.8.1.1.1. Business to Consumer (b2c)

1.8.1.1.2. Consumer to Consumer (c2c)

1.8.1.1.3. Business to Business (b2b)

1.8.1.1.4. Virtual Marketplace

1.8.1.1.5. Transaction Broker

1.8.1.1.6. Search Agent

1.8.1.2. Advertising Model

1.8.1.2.1. Business to Business

1.8.1.3. Merchant Model

1.8.1.3.1. E-Tailer

1.8.1.3.2. Business to Consumer

1.8.1.4. Affiliate Model

1.8.1.4.1. Banner Exchange - users feature Amazon banners on their webpages, in return get paid a % if click through generates sale.

1.8.2. Consumer Advantages

1.8.2.1. Long Tail

1.8.2.2. Social Network

1.8.2.2.1. Peer Reviewed Ratings

1.8.2.2.2. Social Media Sharing

1.8.2.3. Immediate Price Comparison

1.8.2.4. Recommended Products

1.8.3. Market Advantages

1.8.3.1. First Mover Advantage?

2. E-commerce Business Models

2.1. Business to Business (b2b)

2.1.1. E-Distributor

2.1.2. E-Procurement

2.1.3. Exchange

2.1.4. Industry consortium

2.2. Business to Consumer (b2c)

2.2.1. Portal

2.2.1.1. Horizontal

2.2.1.2. Vertical / Specialised

2.2.1.3. Search

2.2.2. E-Tailer

2.2.2.1. Virtual Merchant

2.2.2.2. Bricks-and-Clicks

2.2.2.3. Catalogue Merchant

2.2.2.4. Manufacturer-Direct

2.2.3. Content Provider

2.2.4. Transaction Broker

2.2.5. Market Creator

2.2.6. Service Provider

2.2.7. Community Provider

2.3. Consumer to Consumer (c2c)

2.4. Peer to Peer (p2p)

2.5. Mobile commerce

3. Fundamentals of E-commerce

3.1. User Experience

3.1.1. Customer Service/Support

3.1.2. Accessibility

3.1.3. Functionality

3.1.4. Navigation

3.2. Trust/Credibility

3.2.1. Peer Review

3.2.2. Online Community

3.3. Content

3.3.1. Niche Markets

3.3.2. Long Tail

3.4. Accessibility

3.4.1. "Always on" 24/7

3.4.2. Breakdown of geographical barriers

3.4.3. Diversity of technologies

3.4.4. Division between connected and disconnected

3.5. Speed

3.6. Privacy

4. Elements of a business model

4.1. Value Proposition

4.2. Revenue Model

4.2.1. Advertising

4.2.2. Subscription

4.2.3. Transaction Fee

4.2.4. Sales

4.2.5. Affiliate

4.3. Market Opportunity

4.3.1. Product Life Cycles

4.3.2. Consumer attention span

4.4. Competitive Environment

4.5. Competitive Advantage

4.5.1. First-Mover advantage

4.5.2. Second-Mover advantage

4.5.3. Complementary Resources

4.5.4. Unfair competitive advantage

4.5.5. Perfect Market

4.5.6. Leverage

4.6. Market Strategy

4.7. Organisational Development

4.8. Management Team

5. Features of E-commerce Technology

5.1. Protean

5.2. Ubiquitous

5.3. Global reach

5.3.1. Globalisation

5.3.2. Decentralisation

5.3.3. Diversification

5.4. Universal standards

5.4.1. Rapid technological advancement

5.5. Interactivity

5.6. Personalisation / Customisation

5.7. Information density

5.8. Social Networking technologies

5.8.1. Many-to-Many Communication

5.9. Tangible and Intangible Goods

5.9.1. Long "shelf" life (Long Tail)

5.9.2. Digital Products

5.10. Connectedness

6. Customers

6.1. Advantages

6.1.1. Niche Content

6.1.2. Specific

6.1.3. Convenience

6.1.4. Time

6.1.5. Abandonment of location

6.1.6. Search engines

6.1.7. Cost effective

6.1.8. Global accessibility

6.1.9. Immediacy

6.1.9.1. Price comparison

6.1.9.2. Product reviews

6.1.9.3. Purchase transaction

6.2. Disadvantages

6.2.1. Impersonal customer service

6.2.2. Miscommunication

6.2.3. Security

6.2.4. New skills necessary

6.2.5. Infrastructure necessary for connectedness

6.2.6. Fear of new technologies

6.2.7. Misuse of information

7. Economic Models

7.1. Network Economy

7.1.1. "Age of Access" (Rifkin 2001)

7.1.1.1. Ownership versus Access

7.1.1.2. Speed

7.1.1.2.1. Increased research and marketing costs

7.1.1.2.2. Volatility

7.1.1.2.3. Advancement of Technology

7.1.1.3. Commodification of Play

7.1.2. Departure from Industrial Economy

7.1.3. Intellectual Property

7.1.4. Temporality

7.1.5. Abundance = value

7.1.5.1. Value in "free"

7.1.6. Emphasis on first mover advantage

7.2. Attention Economy

7.2.1. Illusory Attention

7.2.2. Value to the Individual

7.2.3. Temporality

7.2.4. Originality

7.2.5. Power through level of "enthrallment"

7.2.6. Breakdown of organisational barriers

7.2.7. Copying promotes attention

7.2.7.1. Intellectual Property

7.2.8. Identity

7.2.9. Advertising Revenue model

8. Amazon.com

8.1. "The Culture of Metrics"

8.1.1. search relevance rankings

8.1.2. home page design

8.1.3. consumer behaviour

8.1.3.1. network economy

8.1.3.2. attention economy

8.1.4. software based recommendations

8.1.5. data driven automation

8.1.5.1. merchandising

8.1.5.2. recommendations

8.1.5.3. ad generation and bidding

8.2. Customer Service

8.2.1. Web Design

8.2.2. Standard e-tail facilities

8.2.3. Gift economy

8.2.3.1. free shipping

8.2.3.2. read it first

8.2.3.3. customer reviews

8.2.4. Amazon shopping experience

8.2.5. Large range of products

8.2.5.1. The Long Tail

8.2.6. Competitve/Low prices

8.3. Innovation

8.3.1. Third party use of Amazon technologies

8.3.1.1. 'Syndicated Stores' program

8.3.1.2. Amazon Web Services (AWS)

8.3.1.3. Licensing

8.3.2. Developing technology internally

8.3.2.1. first mover advantage

8.3.2.2. innovator's dilemma

8.3.2.3. second mover advantage

8.3.3. Efficiency/Optimisation

8.3.3.1. Links to Metrics

8.3.3.2. Links to Attention Economy

8.3.3.3. Links to Customer Service

8.4. Investment

8.4.1. Links to Innovation

8.4.2. Kindle

8.4.2.1. Links to Network Economy

8.4.2.2. Links to tangible/intangible goods

8.4.3. Partnerships

8.4.3.1. Links to Network Economy

8.4.3.2. Expansion into new markets

8.4.4. "Law of Churn"

8.5. Exponential Growth

8.5.1. Network Effects

8.5.2. Large range of products

8.5.2.1. The Long Tail

8.5.3. Dominant market share

8.6. Generating Income

8.6.1. Commission from partnerships

8.6.1.1. Waterstones.co.uk

8.6.1.2. Borders.com

8.6.1.3. Toys R Us

8.6.1.4. Earning income off its competitors

8.6.1.5. Operating alongside competitors to offer customers wide range of products

8.6.1.5.1. Links to Network Economy

8.6.2. Commission from Amazon Marketplace

8.6.3. Amazon [email protected]

8.6.3.1. fixed fees

8.6.3.2. commission

8.6.4. "Shelf space"

8.6.4.1. charging for prime position on website

8.6.5. Sales

8.6.6. Co-branded credit card agreements

8.7. Customer set

8.7.1. Content creators

8.7.2. Consumers

8.7.3. Sellers

8.7.4. Enterprises