Raver EBP Models

Get Started. It's Free
or sign up with your email address
Raver EBP Models by Mind Map: Raver EBP Models

1. ARCC EBP Model

1.1. Purpose and components of the model,

1.1.1. Epistemological assumptions (what counts as "evidence" in this model?)

1.1.2. What kinds of questions are you encouraged to ask?

1.1.3. How is the model justified--how is it unique? Why do we need it?

1.1.3.1. Takes into account organizational culture and readiness Primarily addresses implementation (Individual Change)

1.1.3.2. Offers tools to assess organizational feasibility and evaluate EBP outcomes

1.1.4. Components

1.1.4.1. Organizational culture and readiness for implementation

1.1.4.2. EBP Mentors identification

1.1.4.2.1. Facilitator of nurses' skills to develop the knowledge and skills to implement EBP projects effectively

1.1.4.3. EBP Belief Scale: the strengths and barriers of the EBP process in the organization

1.1.4.4. Implementing evidence into the organization's practice

1.1.4.5. Evaluating evidence outcomes resulting from any practice change

1.1.5. Purpose/Goals

1.1.5.1. (1) promoting EBP among both advanced practice and staff nurses locally and nationally

1.1.5.2. (2) establishing a cadre of EBP mentors to facilitate EBP in health care organizations,

1.1.5.3. (3) disseminating and facilitating use of the best evidence from well-designed studies to advance an evidence-based approach to clinical care

1.1.5.4. (4) conducting an annual national EBP conference

1.1.5.5. (5) conducting studies to evaluate the effectiveness of the ARCC model on the process and outcomes of clinical care

1.1.5.6. (6) conducting studies to evaluate the effectiveness of the EBP implementation strategies

1.2. Levels of assessed:

1.2.1. What are the levels of evidence?

1.2.2. How many levels of evidence are there?

1.3. Search strategies:

1.3.1. Where would you start looking to answer questions in this model (e.g., the library? Medline?)

1.3.1.1. External

1.3.1.1.1. systematic reviews

1.3.1.1.2. randomized control trials

1.3.1.1.3. best practice

1.3.1.1.4. clinical practice guidelines that support change in clinical practice

1.3.1.2. Internal

1.3.1.2.1. Healthcare provider expertise

1.3.1.2.2. quality improvement projects outcome management initiatives

1.3.1.3. Patient

1.3.1.3.1. Preferences

1.3.1.3.2. Values

1.3.2. What kinds of tools are recommended for searching?

1.4. References:

1.4.1. https://health.ucdavis.edu/cnr/download/1-s2.0-S8755722305001456-main.pdf

1.5. Based on: Cognitive Behavior theory

1.5.1. "Cognitive Behavioural Theory guides clinicians to change behaviour towards adopting EBP Organizational and Readiness Scale for EBP for assessment of organizational culture Evidence-Based Implementation Scale for measurement of EBP in practice."

1.6. Control Theory

2. IOWA EBP Model

2.1. Systemic Design

2.1.1. How the organizations change their practice based on the research

2.2. Purpose and components of the model,

2.2.1. Epistemological assumptions (what counts as "evidence" in this model?)

2.2.2. What kinds of questions are you encouraged to ask?

2.2.3. How is the model justified--how is it unique? Why do we need it?

2.2.3.1. Used to promote quality patient care and is based on Diffusion of Innovation

2.3. Levels of assessed:

2.3.1. What are the levels of evidence?

2.3.2. How many levels of evidence are there?

2.4. Search strategies:

2.4.1. Where would you start looking to answer questions in this model (e.g., the library? Medline?)

2.4.1.1. searches, critiques, and synthesizes of the literature

2.4.2. What kinds of tools are recommended for searching?

2.5. Module for EBP Change

2.6. Decision Points

2.6.1. The first decision is whether the problem or knowledge-focused trigger is a priority for the organization. An affirmative decision leads to formation of a team which searches, critiques, and synthesizes the literature.

2.6.2. The second decision point considers the adequacy of evidence tochange practice. Inadequate evidence leads the practitionerto a choice between conduction of research or utilization ofalternative types of evidence (i.e. case reports and expertopinion). When adequate evidence is found, a pilot of thechange is conducted

2.6.3. Evaluation of the pilot leads to the third decision point–whether to adopt the change in practice.

3. Johns Hopkins Nursing EBP Model

3.1. Johns Hopkins EBP

3.2. Purpose and components of the model,

3.2.1. Epistemological assumptions (what counts as "evidence" in this model?)

3.2.2. What kinds of questions are you encouraged to ask?

3.2.3. How is the model justified--how is it unique? Why do we need it?

3.2.3.1. Good for Clinical settings

3.2.3.2. Strength is not in organizational or cultural change

3.3. Levels of assessed:

3.3.1. What are the levels of evidence?

3.4. Search strategies:

3.4.1. Where would you start looking to answer questions in this model (e.g., the library? Medline?)

3.4.2. What kinds of tools are recommended for searching?

3.4.2.1. Rating tools

3.4.2.2. Practitioner and Patient expertise accounted for

3.5. 3 Major steps

3.5.1. (1) identification of the practice question, using a team approach;

3.5.2. (2) collection of the evidence, which involves searching, critiquing, summarizing, determining strength of evidence, and making recommendations

3.5.3. 3)translation of the evidence for use in practice, which includes determining feasibility of adopting the change and creating an action plan for implementation

4. Joanna Briggs EBP Model

4.1. Purpose and components of the model,

4.1.1. Epistemological assumptions (what counts as "evidence" in this model?)

4.1.2. What kinds of questions are you encouraged to ask?

4.1.3. How is the model justified--how is it unique? Why do we need it?

4.1.3.1. Provides tools for assisting the user: a question development tool, an evidence rating scale, and appraisal criteria for research and non-research evidence

4.1.3.2. User friendly for the beside nurse as well as academic application

4.2. Levels of assessed:

4.2.1. How many levels of evidence are there?

4.2.2. What are the levels of evidence?

4.3. Search strategies:

4.3.1. Where would you start looking to answer questions in this model (e.g., the library? Medline?)

4.3.2. What kinds of tools are recommended for searching?

5. PARIHS EBP model

5.1. Purpose and components of the model,

5.1.1. Epistemological assumptions (what counts as "evidence" in this model?)

5.1.1.1. Robust

5.1.1.2. Accessible

5.1.1.3. What is the evidence?

5.1.1.3.1. Research

5.1.1.3.2. Clinincal Experience

5.1.1.3.3. Patient experience

5.1.1.3.4. Local data/Information

5.1.2. What kinds of questions are you encouraged to ask?

5.1.2.1. What is the context of the evidence?

5.1.2.1.1. Culture

5.1.2.1.2. Leadership

5.1.2.1.3. Evaluation

5.1.2.2. Facilitation of the evidence

5.1.2.2.1. Purpose

5.1.2.2.2. Role

5.1.2.2.3. Skill and Attributes

5.1.3. How is the model justified--how is it unique? Why do we need it?

5.1.3.1. Recognizes unpredictable and changing factors and includes evidence from patients and practitioners

5.1.3.2. framework allows for a complex process of EBP implementation

5.1.3.3. offers users online tools with a User Guide. In terms of a process guide to implement practice change

5.1.3.4. Collaboration!!

5.1.3.5. Focus is on ways to deliver evidence-based and clinically effective care to clients

5.2. Levels of assessed:

5.2.1. How many levels of evidence are there?

5.2.2. What are the levels of evidence?

5.3. Search strategies:

5.3.1. Where would you start looking to answer questions in this model (e.g., the library? Medline?)

5.3.2. What kinds of tools are recommended for searching?

5.4. 3 Elements

5.4.1. Evidence, is described as sources of knowledge as perceived by multiple stakeholders.

5.4.2. The second element, context, describes the quality of the environment where the research is being con-ducted.

5.4.3. The third element, facilitation, is a technique to support people to change (i.e. attitude and skills)

6. Stetler EBP Model

6.1. Prescriptive Design

6.1.1. "Focus on how individual practitioners implement the research"

6.2. Purpose and components of the model,

6.2.1. Epistemological assumptions (what counts as "evidence" in this model?)

6.2.2. What kinds of questions are you encouraged to ask?

6.2.3. How is the model justified--how is it unique? Why do we need it?

6.2.3.1. Critical Thinking process

6.2.3.2. Used by groups > change

6.2.3.3. Internal and external facilitation of the evidence

6.3. Levels of assessed:

6.3.1. What are the levels of evidence?

6.3.2. How many levels of evidence are there?

6.4. Search strategies:

6.4.1. Where would you start looking to answer questions in this model (e.g., the library? Medline?)

6.4.1.1. literature review

6.4.2. What kinds of tools are recommended for searching?

6.5. Phases

6.5.1. Phase I, preparation, includes definition ofthe purpose, contextual assessment and search for sources of evidence

6.5.2. Phase II is validation of the evidence found

6.5.3. Phase III is comparative evaluation/decision-making, where the evidence found is critiqued, synthesized, and a decision for use is made with consideration of external and internal factors

6.5.4. Phase IV refinements provide implementation/trans-lation guidance for change in practice

6.5.5. Phase V is evaluation, which includes outcomes met and the degree to which the practice change was implemented

7. The Clinical Scholar Module

8. Steven Star Module of Knowledge Transformation

8.1. Individual and Organizational use