YouTube Risks

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YouTube Risks by Mind Map: YouTube Risks

1. if used in embedded mode into your site then can limit the drag

2. Articles

2.1. blog July 2008

2.1.1. YouTube is an unnecessary risk to reputation.

2.1.2. "drag"

2.1.2.1. They pull along a little red wagon full of undesirable content behind them.

2.1.2.2. Positioned alongside this often questionable content, your message could end up sending a viewer to a competitor, or worse still, cause them to be offended.

2.1.3. Forms of drag

2.1.3.1. Advertising

2.1.3.1.1. Ads on some sites are extremely inappropriate, offering Viagra and Cialis, or dating services, adding an undesirable sleaze factor to the viewing experience.

2.1.3.1.2. Perhaps worse is the prospect, quite real, of a viewer being hijacked by an ad for a competitive product or service.

2.1.3.1.3. check what is on YT

2.1.3.2. Related Videos

2.1.3.2.1. videos linked to yours through the virtue of a few key words

2.1.3.2.2. This offers a multitude of ways for your message to be diluted or connected with something you’d prefer not to have your company associated with.

2.1.3.2.3. Delta case study

2.1.3.3. Comments

2.1.3.3.1. This is really a problem on YouTube, where it seems there are thousands of people with nothing better to do than leave comments like “this video sucks” and “fail!”

2.1.3.3.2. “All in all, do they really think they are going to win over one extra voter with this stuff? All interaction is another way of people saying they hate you. People on the internet feel a lot braver than when they are face to face with you.”

2.1.3.3.3. YT does not check what is uploaded

2.1.3.4. Rating

2.1.3.4.1. star ratings

2.1.3.5. YT links to articles that refer to a video

2.1.4. Alternatives to free services

2.1.4.1. Bright Cove

2.1.4.1.1. long text

2.1.4.2. There are a number of similar offerings to Brightcove, such as Permission TV, Maven Networks, KIT Digital, The FeedRoom, and VMIX, Twistage, and Move Networks. I have singled out Brightcove not because it is the best of these (though it may be), but because I am familiar with it.

2.2. May 09 Gordon Browns Youtube Trauma

2.2.1. YT here

2.2.1.1. 70K views

2.2.1.1.1. as of April 4000 watch this one but video of him picking his nose has been watched 630,000 times

2.2.1.2. no comments

2.2.1.2.1. looks bad

2.2.1.3. when did he post it?

2.2.2. Brown’s mistake, in this instance, was poor management and a lack of empathy.

2.2.3. On a matter dear to the hearts of all MPs - their pay and expenses - rather than consult, he pronounced his verdict. That he used YouTube to do it is a sideshow.

2.2.4. Social Media tools are just that. In the hand of a craftsman they can achieve great things, but if used in a sloppy manner they will not magically give great results.

2.2.5. another whole article on "he turned off comments"

2.2.5.1. reason - moderating offensive comments would be too arduous.

2.2.5.2. Closing down the conversation

2.2.5.3. However, I suspect in this case, it was pretty good crisis management.

2.2.5.4. people took the conversation elsewhere

2.2.5.5. For although the stated aim of the exercise is to speak directly to voters, it seems that No 10 seems less keen to have the voters talk back.

2.2.5.6. follow Civil Service Code

2.2.5.6.1. In terms of allowing people to comment online, we need to adhere to the Civil Service code: no content on the website can be party-political. We would need to monitor and moderate all comments posted online.”

2.2.5.6.2. big limitation

2.2.6. His performance in the expenses video, notably his awkward smile and disconcerting body movements, have been widely mocked.

2.2.7. "woeful viewing figures"

2.2.7.1. you get judged like this

2.2.8. general internet presence

2.2.8.1. official Downing Street YouTube portal

2.2.8.1.1. something you can setup?

2.2.8.1.2. YouTube channel, started under Tony Blair in 2007

2.2.8.1.3. it has a Twitter feed, a Facebook page and an e-petitions site, on which voters can lobby the Prime Minister.

2.2.8.2. Paul Staines, who is author of the Guido Fawkes political blog, said that Downing Street was playing into the hands of Mr Brown’s detractors by trying to conquer the internet.

2.2.8.3. e-petitions

2.2.8.3.1. The e-petitions website, launched in 2006, has proved to be a headache for the Government,

2.2.8.3.2. with people more likely to use it to petition for Jeremy Clarkson to be made prime minister than to save their local school.

2.2.8.3.3. The eighth most popular petition of the moment, with 17,665 signatures and counting, asks Mr Brown to do just one thing: resign.

2.3. Highjack YouTube Marketing Videos

2.3.1. Publishing content on your corporate website using the YouTube service is a risky game.

2.3.2. examples

2.3.2.1. good

2.3.2.1.1. Lloyds TSB ad

2.3.2.2. bad

2.3.2.2.1. IBM Blade vs HP

2.3.3. how to hijack example example

2.4. Security Oct 08

2.4.1. Computer security specialists warn that hackers are using fake YouTube pages to trick people into opening their machines to diabolical software.

2.4.2. "Essentially this can be used as a tool to serve up everything -- botnets, key loggers. Visually, you can't differentiate this from your regular YouTube page, it is done so well."

2.4.3. While people may be wary of links or programs emailed to them by strangers, they eagerly open such offerings from "friends" in social networking communities.

2.4.4. Estimates are that as much as 40 percent of social networking profiles are fakes, according to figures cited by Cloudmark Inc., a company specializing in protecting Internet messaging systems from spam and hackers.

2.5. Using YouTube, Oz Gov

2.5.1. ease of use, its cost effectiveness and its ability to reach an established audience.

2.5.2. issues

2.5.2.1. availability

2.5.2.1.1. YouTube reserves it right to interrupt, modify or discontinue aspects of its services. YouTube’s potential unreliability may have ramifications for the stability of government web pages when using embedded YouTube players.

2.5.2.1.2. imitation as on occasion, they have been unable to effectively upload and release their videos at appointed times in Australia, due to scheduled outages and maintenance

2.5.2.1.3. ‘timed’ release of content, to coordinate with the launch of a program for example, this is a significant limitation.

2.5.2.2. embedding

2.5.2.2.1. Embedded YouTube players incorporate prominent YouTube branding and link to the YouTube website, of which the removal is prohibited. The issue for Government is an implied endorsement of a commercial third party and potentially unfair competitive advantage.

2.5.2.2.2. Embedded YouTube players include links to and advertising of other videos at the conclusion of each video's content, this 'banner' of content represents advertising on the part of YouTube and cannot be controlled or removed and it may include irrelevant, inappropriate and potentially offensive video clips.

2.5.2.2.3. trailers

2.5.2.2.4. tagging

2.5.2.3. related

2.5.2.3.1. YouTube use a system of promoting ‘related’ videos and ‘promoted’ videos on the page that contains an agencies uploaded video (where videos are uploaded to the YouTube site as opposed to the YouTube player being embedded onto the government website). These related videos are also presented on the basis of related keywords. For example, a campaign targeted at youth on the topic of binge drinking might include the ‘tags’ of ‘teenage’ and ‘drinking’ and ‘nightmare’.

2.5.2.4. rights granted

2.5.2.4.1. By submitting a YouTube video government automatically grants a broad licence to YouTube and YouTube users to reproduce, distribute and prepare derivative works of and display the video. YouTube can use any submitted video in anyway whether commercial or non-commercial.

2.5.2.4.2. According to the YouTube Terms of use, agencies loose control of their content once it is posted.

2.5.2.5. actors copyright

2.5.2.5.1. Many agencies are successfully using YouTube and some have negotiated their own YouTube channel. However, they have found additional issues around the use of their content especially if the video content used actors that were contracted under advertising guidelines for a certain media that has been extended into video on the internet. Permissions must be sought from actors and people appearing in the videos to be broadcast on video sharing websites.

2.5.2.6. deletion

2.5.2.6.1. YouTube licenses do not automatically terminate once a video is removed - licences remain for a 'commercially reasonable amount of time'.

2.5.2.7. ToC

2.5.2.7.1. The Terms of Use are heavily in favour of YouTube.

2.5.2.7.2. They purport to deny or heavily limit their liability to the user, and generally require the user of the site to indemnify the provider against any loss or damage arising out of their use of the site or service.

2.5.2.7.3. Dispute resolution clauses specify the U.S. as the relevant jurisdiction for resolving any disputes. Acceptance of the Terms of Use by the user forms a legally binding agreement.

2.5.2.7.4. It should be noted though that these are not dissimilar terms to those offered by most private organisations, but the issue should be considered by agencies in their assessment of the use of YouTube.

2.5.2.8. endorsement

2.5.2.8.1. Another issue agencies should consider is the brand ‘YouTube’ is used in their embedded video player and all over the YouTube website itself. There is an issue that relates to what might appear to be Government endorsement of a particular service or website because of the branding that is automatically affixed to downloads or content from that site.

2.6. scribd

2.6.1. youtube marketing

2.6.2. video marketing

3. Other

3.1. actions

3.1.1. check the drag around Jimbo's articles

3.2. observations

3.2.1. youtube videos are downloadable

3.2.1.1. best to assume permanent and not deletable

3.3. Why YouTube?

3.3.1. People don't want to join more communities, so YouTube useful

3.3.2. tired of FaceBook groups

3.3.3. some answers

3.3.4. viral marketing ideas

3.3.5. presence or dominance?

3.3.5.1. It is like a giant attention lottery

3.3.5.2. where the very few motivate the very many, through their success stories of 15 minute world fame, to copy their endeavour and try to achieve that kind of world wide recognition.

4. youtube in education

4.1. why?

4.1.1. easy to use interface

4.1.2. a robust connection

4.1.3. and the largest collection of videos on the Internet.

4.1.4. reasonable to good quality for streaming

4.1.5. It is the standard others are measured against

4.2. may be blocked

4.2.1. security

4.2.2. avoid inappropriate content

5. youtube in business

5.1. why

5.1.1. More than 100 million videos viewed each day

5.1.2. tens of millions of unique visitors

5.1.3. one of the top sites on the Internet and so on.

5.1.4. majority are watching not uploading, so you really have an audience

5.2. what to upload

5.2.1. executive ppt

5.2.2. training

5.2.3. help

5.2.3.1. eg. answer to common help desk call

5.2.4. marketing

5.2.5. events

6. LA times Sept 2008

6.1. YouTube helped jump-start the online video craze with consumers. Corporate parent Google Inc. is banking that it can do the same in the business world.

6.2. integrate with G Docs

6.2.1. The free add-on to Google Apps allows employees to upload a video -- say a training video, a corporate announcement or highlights of a sales conference -- and then invite colleagues to view it securely. Employees can also comment on videos, add descriptions and tags, embed videos in internal Web pages, search for any video to which they have access or download videos to their laptops or phones.

6.3. How big a draw will video be for businesses?

6.3.1. Analysts aren't sure. Until now, companies have been slower to adopt video because of the cost and complexity.

6.3.2. AMR Research analyst Jim Murphy says he's impressed with the progress Google is making in appealing to corporate America.

7. The-YouTube-Revolution

7.1. connect with your target audience.

8. How-to-Use-Online-Video-for-Marketing