Chapter 2: The Aesthetics of Domination

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Chapter 2: The Aesthetics of Domination by Mind Map: Chapter 2: The Aesthetics of Domination

1. Class, Culture, and the Lives of Domestic Workers

1.1. Domestic work is a very low paying job with high numbers of Brazilian women working there

1.1.1. women cook and clean for others

1.1.2. most common mentioned characteristic of D.worker is that they "talk differently"

2. THE STRUGGLE TO EARN A LIVING WAGE

2.1. The workers cannot live on their wages

2.2. Can have long travel time to employer's home

2.3. After long day of work, Gloria had to go home a cook and clean at her own house

2.4. Treated like slaves

2.4.1. there are roles that are respected, but not typical

2.5. not enough wealthy people to have jobs for less fortunate

2.6. Middle Class in Rio de Janeiro:

2.6.1. necessary to employ a domestic worker

2.6.1.1. class marker

3. POVERTY IN BRAZIL AND RIO DE JANEIRO

3.1. Rio is the second largest city in Brazil

3.1.1. unequal distribution of income across the metropolitan area in Brazil

3.1.2. drastic change in demographics was the increasing feminization of workforce and increase in child work

3.1.3. migration has helped the cities growth : 22% of city's total population

4. CLASS, CULTURE AND THE EFFECTS OF DOMINATION

4.1. Economic perspective : exchange of labor for wages

4.2. Domestic worker/employer relationship have intimacies that are there even with the class gap ("Social apartheid" of Brazil)

4.2.1. Social Apartheid is a division of the classes and everyday culture

5. FROM SLAVERY TO SERVITUDE

5.1. Gloria worked an early part of her childhood as a servant on a large farm (fazenda)

5.1.1. her mother worked in fields

5.1.2. Gloria worked as a cook in the kitchen

5.1.3. Food was never the same for the workers/employers

6. COLONIAL RIO DE JANEIRO

6.1. HISTORY: Rio has a connection to slaves, ex-slaves, and domestic workers since the beginning of the colonial period

6.2. extremities of domestic worker/employer relationship

6.2.1. racial dimension

6.2.2. Domestic Worker = dirty work

6.3. even after legal abolition: D.servants expected to provide sexual/nurturing services

6.4. still has a colonial and seigneurial past

7. PARA INGLES VER, OR FOR THE ENGLISH TO SEE

7.1. Racial tension shown in postmancipation urban and architectural design

7.1.1. physically reinforced separation of classes: privileged and unprivileged

8. AMBIGUOUS AFFECTIONS

8.1. Gloria's child was allowed to come to work with her

8.1.1. not to make more money but to learn how to do the job and help to finish in less time

8.2. ambiguties and complications are embodied in daily social relations

8.2.1. fine line between wanting to help and recognizing what was possible/expected

8.3. middle and upper-class talk about D.workers with love and appreciation

8.3.1. family like - nanny, cook, comforter in times of sorrow

9. EUPHEMIZATION OF POWER RELATIONS

9.1. Protection of class privilege is seen

9.1.1. less civilized, less worthy as citizen, less human

9.2. Brazil has vibrant consumer culture, encourage consumer habits

9.3. poor neighborhoods and favelas pushed out to hillsides and outer edges of city

9.3.1. reinforced that poor should be out of sight

9.4. Scott Bourdieu (pg.88) "masking the many nasty facts of domination and giving them harmless or sanitized aspect"

9.4.1. slavery in best interest of slaves because it kept them fed and clothed

10. A GAME OF SIGNS: CULTURAL CAPITAL AND THE REPRODUCTION OF CLASS

10.1. When a D.worker it is hard to get academic credentials

10.1.1. Handwriting, bodily movements, ways of behaving: gives away class status

10.1.2. Act differently in a situation that you are unfamiliar: Gloria had never seen a menu before or talked to a waiter

11. LIMITATIONS OF ACADEMIC CAPITAL

11.1. more limited in Brazil than in the U.S. or France

11.2. education capital of Brazil is tied to cultural capital and cultural capita; parallels privelege

11.3. poor conditions in class rooms, hard to concentrate

11.3.1. barely learn to read and write

11.4. poor children need to help make money or do chores so there is little time to go to school

12. LAUGHTER OF A COMMUNITY

12.1. always group activities

12.2. made fun of the tragedies of the poor lives

12.3. laughter psychologically sustain families

13. LAUGHTER OUT OF PLACE : DONNA M. GOLDSTEIN