What is happening to the earth's climate?

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What is happening to the earth's climate? by Mind Map: What is happening to the earth's climate?

1. i win

2. Limitations: Trees take many years to mature, so the positive effects of tree planting will take time to materialize. Even relatively fast-growing trees such as angsanas, raintrees and yellow flames that were planted by NParks took 25 years to reach their full height.

3. Explanation: Higher temperatures may result in longer growing seasons in some regions. the growing seasons refers to the period during which crops can be grown. Evidence: An increase in the types of crops that can be grown in the United Kingdom. New crops such as blackberries and maize can be cultivated.

4. Singapore Green Plan 2012 is a government blueprint for environmental sustainability in Singapore, prepared by the Ministry of the Environment and Water Resources. On 27 July 2005, a public forum was held to gather views for the plan on air and climate changes, water and clean land, conservation, waste reduction, and nature and public health. The Green Plan underwent a review which ended in December 2005, and a 2006 revision was launched. The Green Plan takes on the three challenges of Clean Air, Clean Water and Clean Land

5. Natural Causes of Climate Change

6. The Singapore Green Plan is to ensure that Singapore, through sound environmental management, achieves economic development that meets the needs of the present generation without compromising the needs of future generations

7. Anthropogenic Causes of Climate Change

8. The target(internationalagreement with long term goal of keeping any increase in the global mean maximum teperature within 2 degree of the global temperature before 1850) for the reduction of green house gas emission were successful :D

9. The Kyoto Protocol emerged from the United Nations so called Earth Summit held in Brazil in 1992. Seeing the need to cut greenhouse gas emissions, the organization proposed a treaty that would help stabilize emissions “ at a level that would prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system.” This would be a ten year agreement to cut greenhouse gas emissions. dog

10. Lengthening growing season in some regions

10.1. Explanation: Higher temperatures may result in longer growing seasons in some regions. The growing season refers to the period during which crops can be grown. Evidence: An increase in the types of crops that can be grown in the United Kingdom. New crops such as blackberries and maize can be cultivated.

11. The deal was brokered between China, South Africa, India, Brazil and the US, but it was unclear whether it would be adopted by all 192 countries in the full plenary session. The deal aims to provide $30bn a year for poor countries to adapt to climate change from next year to 2012, and $100bn a year by 2020.

12. reducing the level of green house gases in the atmosphere

13. More heat-related illness or diseases

14. National Urban Transport Policy

15. A significant portion of the average person's carbon footprint results from eating habits. Commercial fertilizers are made using fossil fuels, and most farm machinery burns diesel fuel. Meat, dairy and seafood all have a much greater carbon footprint and also require more land than fruit and vegetable crops; shifting your food consumption away from red meat and dairy toward fruits, vegetables, fish and poultry -- even a day's worth of calories -- has a greater positive environmental impact than buying local produce. Processed foods emit more carbon, because the factories that produce them use energy. Finally, transporting food, sometimes thousands of miles, uses a great deal of fuel.

16. Limitations

17. so that future generation have trees

18. Kyoto Protocol

18.1. Brief Info

18.1.1. Comsumation, The easiest way to reduce greenhouse gas emissions resulting from your lifestyle is simply to buy less. Failing that, avoid products with excessive plastic packaging, recycle or reuse whenever possible, and make fewer shopping trips in order to use less fuel.

18.2. Successes

18.2.1. Many countries have met or exceeded the targets (at least 5% below their 1990 levels)

18.2.2. Many nations have followed through on their agreement and cut greenhouse gas emissions, an example is the European Union. wk

18.2.3. Kyoto’s roots go back to 1992, when the international community gathered at the Rio Earth Summit. Leaders there signed the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, an attempt to stabilize global greenhouse gas emissions. “There was a feeling that the way to proceed would be with an international agreement that had some teeth in it,” said Eileen Claussen, President of the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions.

18.3. Limitations

18.3.1. Not compulsory for all countries to sign the Kyoto Protocol with low greenhouse gas emmissions

19. Copenhagen Conference

19.1. Brief Info

19.2. Successes

20. Limitations

21. Green Mark Scheme

22. National Level

22.1. Plant-A-Tree Programme

22.1.1. Description of Strategy: Started in 1971 as Tree Planting Day, the Plant-A-Tree Programme by the Garden City Fund and Singapore Environment Council aims to maintain Singapore’s status as a Garden City by planting trees. Residents are encouraged to donate money to buy a tree or take part in tree planting events that take place monthly throughout Singapore.

22.1.2. Successes: The programme has contributed to an estimated 60,000 tress planted yearly through Singapore by the National Parks Board (NParks). Trees help remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.

22.1.3. Limitations: Trees take many years to mature, so the positive effects of tree planting will take time to materialize. Even relatively fast-growing trees such as angsanas, raintrees and yellow flames that were planted by NParks took 25 years to reach their full height.

22.2. Energy Labelling Programme

22.3. Indian Network of Climate Change Assessment

22.3.1. The Indian Network on Climate Change Assessment (INCCA) is a proposed network of scientists in India to be set up to publish peer-reviewed findings on climate change in India.

22.4. Save energy everyday

23. Singapore Green Plan

24. Causes of Climate Change

25. Impact of Climate Change

25.1. Sea-Level Rise

25.1.1. Coastal communities in the Southeast will likely face sea level rise, increased hurricane intensity, and storm surge, among other climate change impacts.

25.2. More frequent extreme weather event

25.2.1. Explanation: INCREASING DUE TO HIGHER LAND AND SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURES. Evidence: Heat waves, floods, droughts and tropical cyclones.

25.2.1.1. Evidence:

25.2.1.1.1. глупо

26. Global warming

26.1. fart

26.1.1. Cow fart

26.1.1.1. YOLO fart~

27. Frequent Extreme Weather Events

27.1. Heat Waves

28. Responses

28.1. International Level

29. National Urban Transport Policy

29.1. Singapore, with its Rapid Transit Systems (RTS), buses, taxis, its control of private vehicle ownership and usage through the Electronic Road Pricing (ERP) scheme, vehicle tax schemes and the annual quota for growth of the private vehicle fleet, is to be lauded for striking an appropriate balance between economic efficiency, satisfying demand for better transportation and managing traffic congestion. In fact, the ERP systems in place in Singapore, the signboards of the parking guidance system, the speed-trap cameras, the proliferation of GPSs, in totality, all provide the foundation for an Intelligent Transport System (ITS), which could in the future: • Reduce accidents, by enabling vehicle-tovehicle (V2V) communications • Allow for individual vehicles to communicate seamlessly with traffic signals, i.e., vehicleto-infrastructure (V2I) communications, enabling smoother traffic flows [these may be based on Dedicated Short Range Communications (DSRC) technologies] • Provide real-time relevant traffic and weather data to all vehicles (also V2I), and • Enable data capture for traffic management, over time, to assess and improve upon multi-modal transportation performance. Beyond the safety aspects, such systems provide environmental benefits in reducing tail-pipe emissions from idling vehicles and thus improve overall energy efficiency and fuelsavingSF

30. Energy labelling programme

30.1. Since 1 January 08, registrable goods must carry energy labels under the Environmental Protection and Management Act (EPMA).

30.2. Under Section 40C of the EPMA, no person shall, in the course of any trade or business, supply any registrable goods in Singapore on or after the effective date unless the registrable goods are registered and labelled in the prescribed manner.

30.3. Under Section 40D of the EPMA, any importer and manufacturer who intends, in the course of any trade or business, to supply any registrable goods in Singapore on or after the effective date shall apply to the National Environment Agency (NEA) to be registered as a registered supplier and to register any registrable goods, which the importer or manufacturer intends to supply in Singapore.

31. Singapore, with its Rapid Transit Systems

32. (RTS), buses, taxis, its control of private

33. vehicle ownership and usage through the

34. Electronic Road Pricing (ERP) scheme, vehicle

35. tax schemes and the annual quota for growth

36. of the private vehicle fleet, is to be lauded

37. for striking an appropriate balance between

38. economic efficiency, satisfying demand

39. for better transportation and managing

40. traffic congestion.

41. In fact, the ERP systems in place in Singapore,

42. the signboards of the parking guidance system,

43. the speed-trap cameras, the proliferation of

44. GPSs, in totality, all provide the foundation for

45. an Intelligent Transport System (ITS), which

46. could in the future:

47. Reduce accidents, by enabling vehicle-tovehicle (V2V) communications

48. Allow for individual vehicles to communicate

49. seamlessly with traffic signals, i.e., vehicleto-infrastructure (V2I) communications,

50. enabling smoother traffic flows [these

51. may be based on Dedicated Short Range

52. Communications (DSRC) technologies]

53. Provide real-time relevant traffic and

54. weather data to all vehicles (also V2I), and

55. Enable data capture for traffic management,

56. over time, to assess and improve upon

57. multi-modal transportation performance.

58. Beyond the safety aspects, such systems provide

59. environmental benefits in reducing tail-pipe

60. emissions from idling vehicles and thus improve

61. overall energy efficiency and fuelsavings.

62. глупо