Types of Information Systems

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Types of Information Systems by Mind Map: Types of Information Systems

1. Transition Processing Systems

1.1. The data collected by a TPS is stored in databases, and can be used to produce a scheduled set of reports.

1.2. TPS can be used for different data types including monthly bills, weekly paychecks, annual inventory summaries, manufacturing schedules, periodic check register, along with many other uses.

1.3. Transactions nowadays use online processing, also known as OLTP, which means that each transaction is processed immediately once it is entered. transactions require numerous steps, so OLTP systems use strategies such as commit or rollback to ensure that each transaction is correctly processed.

2. Management Information Systems

2.1. MIS increases the efficiency of managerial activity. MIS creates a variety of data reports needed for managers including scheduled reports, ad hoc reports, summary reports, and exception reports.

2.2. Summary reports follow a fixed format and are produced according to a timetable. Ad hoc reports include specific detailed information that can not be found in a summary report. A summary reports show annual sales for example, that include combined totals of data. Exception reports provide information that is outside normal or acceptable ranges.reports follow a fixed format and are produced according to a timetable. Ad hoc reports include specific detailed information that can not be found in a summary report. A summary reports show annual sales for example, that include combined totals of data. Exception reports provide information that is outside normal or acceptable ranges.

3. Decision Support Systems

3.1. A DSS includes modeling tools, such as spreadsheets, so that managers can create a numerical representation of the data, then figure out alternative decisions to whatever the circumstance may be.

3.2. DSS includes data from an organization's TPS that might include or access external data, such as stock market reports or other similar data reports of that nature.

4. Expert Systems

4.1. The facts and rules for an expert system are usually derived by interviewing experts, and then incorporate that into a knowledge base. The knowledge base is then stored in a computer file and can be manipulated by software called an inference engine.

4.2. An expert system is not a problem solver or decision maker. Instead an expert system is designed to make decisions in a certain area or domain.

4.3. Expert systems can be designed with a computer programing language. A software tool that contains an inference engine and a user interface is called an expert system shell. Expert system shells allow developers to enter facts and rules for a knowledge base.

5. Neural Networks

5.1. A neural network uses computer circuitry to stimulate the way the brain may process, learn, and remember information. A neural network establishes it own criteria and rules about the data entered.

5.2. Business and financial applications have been successfully implemented since trend and identification analysis's are crucial. A useful application where neural networks take place is in video surveillance systems.