Scaffolding Strategies for a Grade 9 Writing Class (Tasneem Damji)

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Scaffolding Strategies for a Grade 9 Writing Class (Tasneem Damji) by Mind Map: Scaffolding Strategies for a Grade 9 Writing Class    (Tasneem Damji)

1. Objectives

1.1. 1. The student will be able to identify 5 characteristics of a personal essay

1.1.1. Scaffolding Strategies

1.1.1.1. "Not ready" students

1.1.1.1.1. Share examples of essay topics (e.g. my summer vacation, the invention of skateboards, my family, the Great Wall of China, my hobbies, etc.); in pairs, students identify personal essay topics.

1.1.1.1.2. Introduce new vocabulary using Word Wall

1.1.1.1.3. Introduce new vocabulary using Anchor Charts

1.1.1.2. "Just ready" and "Ready to go beyond" students

1.1.1.2.1. Read two sample texts of varying reading levels on the same topic - 1 personal essay and 1 essay of a different genre (e.g. expository, persuasive, literary analysis of a novel)

1.1.1.2.2. In mixed pairs, students work to understand new vocabulary (and include on Word Wall) and answer specific prompting questions about similar and different characteristics of both essays

1.1.1.2.3. "Beyond ready" students create a Venn diagram to compare and contrast the characteristics of both essays

1.2. 2. The student will be able to examine which facets of their own identity have played key roles in shaping who they are today

1.2.1. Scaffolding Strategies

1.2.1.1. Teacher shows example of own poster board with pictures and words that have shaped her identity (let's call this the "identity board"); class discussion about different components, students ask teacher questions to explain influences on own identity

1.2.1.2. For all students, add word "identity" and synonyms on Word Wall and define in various ways at different levels so all students can understand.

1.2.1.3. In mixed pairs ("not ready" and "just ready" students), students look through magazines and cut out pictures or words that have shaped their lives and glue them on a poster board.

1.2.1.4. For "ready to go beyond" students, independently create own identity board.

1.3. 3. The student will be able to write an effective thesis statement in response to the personal essay prompt "Who Am I?"

1.3.1. Scaffolding Strategies

1.3.1.1. All students

1.3.1.1.1. Introduce topic by showing Flocabulary video, Writing a Thesis, all the way through

1.3.1.1.2. Show the video again, pausing to discuss key points

1.3.1.1.3. Review key concepts with comprehension questions (this can be a competition with mixed level groups)

1.3.1.2. "Not ready" and "Just ready" Students

1.3.1.2.1. Go through lyrics of Writing a Thesis video, identify key vocabulary, define and put new words on Word Wall

1.3.1.2.2. Teacher prompts students with comprehension questions

1.3.1.2.3. Show lyrics with missing words; students fill in the blanks to review key concepts

1.3.1.2.4. Go through sample thesis statements, determine if they are effective and explain why - using Gradual Release of Responsibility Method

1.3.1.2.5. Exit slip - individually, students take Flocabulary's interactive quiz about topic and receive immediate results

1.3.1.2.6. Students write thesis statement for personal essay and get detailed feedback from teacher during teacher-student conferences (pull-in Intensive English teacher facilitates this process for low level ELLS, giving them more time)

1.3.1.3. "Ready to go beyond" Students

1.3.1.3.1. Individually, students take Flocabulary's interactive quiz about topic and receive immediate results

1.3.1.3.2. Provide students with reading passages on topics of interest; students identify thesis statements, determine if they are effective, and explain why

1.3.1.3.3. Students write thesis statement for personal essay and get detailed feedback from teacher during student-teacher conferences.

1.4. 4. The student will be able to create an outline of the personal essay that includes (1) the introductory hook, (2) ideas for 3 body paragraphs, and (3) a conclusion

1.4.1. Scaffolding Strategies

1.4.1.1. All students

1.4.1.1.1. Assess prior knowledge of creating outline with KWL chart (type of graphic organizer) - ask students to recall what they know and help define their search for knowledge by posing questions

1.4.1.1.2. Students read sample personal essay they read earlier in the unit (when identifying 5 characteristics of a personal essay)

1.4.1.1.3. Students (in same level groups) identify main idea in each paragraph and write down on pre-made handout (in similar format of an outline) prepared by teacher

1.4.1.1.4. In same level pairs, students create mind map with main idea of each paragraph (as separate bubbles) and sub-ideas as an example of an outline

1.4.1.1.5. Individually, students create mind map of own topic (pull-in Intensive English teacher facilitates this process for low levels ELLs, giving them more time)

1.4.1.1.6. Peer-to-peer feedback - students give feedback to same level peer's mind map; students write down feedback/records feedback on mobile device and include feedback in revised mind map (pull-in Intensive English teacher facilitates this process for low level ELLs, giving them more time)

2. Background

2.1. Standard

2.1.1. The student will explore topics for a personal essay

2.2. Big ideas

2.2.1. 1. The Pre-Writing stage of the Writing Process is the first and crucial step in writing an essay

2.2.2. 2. An essay cannot be structured, focused or flow effectively if one does not spend time brainstorming topic ideas

2.2.3. 3. A thesis statement is the main idea of the essay - all the ideas in the essay should support the thesis

2.2.4. 4. A thesis statement is a sentence that someone can disagree with

2.2.5. 5. An outline is like a road map to a destination - it guides the development of a well structured essay that supports the thesis statement

2.3. Students

2.3.1. Prior knowledge

2.3.1.1. some students have written personal essays and learned about thesis statements and outlines at the middle school level

2.3.1.2. Some students have written paragraphs about themselves but haven't learned about thesis statements or outlines

2.3.2. Readiness level

2.3.2.1. Advanced English level

2.3.2.1.1. likes to be challenged and work independently

2.3.2.2. Intermediate English level

2.3.2.2.1. excellent study habits and motivation

2.3.2.3. Low English level

2.3.2.3.1. poor study habits and lack motivation

3. Bibliography

3.1. Edutopia. (2014, November 5). Reaching all High School Students: A Multi-Tiered Approach. Retrieved June 9, 2015, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-_lqi7KYKTA eMedia Workshop. (2012, September 17). Teaching Matters: Scaffolding. Retrieved June 9, 2015, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9gNjGD_W3dM Northern Illinois University. (n.d.). Instructional Scaffolding to Improve Learning. Retrieved June 9, 2015, from https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BzYfzjQoASL_Zi1DVklMeDlDNW8/edit Robinson, L. P. (n.d.). Tiering to Avoide Tears: Developing Assignments That Address All Learners' Needs. Retrieved June 9, 2015, from http://www.learnnc.org/lp/editions/every-learner/6680