UX Talk, David Malouf

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UX Talk, David Malouf by Mind Map: UX Talk, David Malouf

1. title

1.1. Anyone can be a UX designer

2. about

2.1. says

2.1.1. philospher

2.1.2. possible a designer

2.1.3. loves observing

2.2. consultant & educator

2.2.1. conflict there

2.3. @daveixd

3. what is design

3.1. useful art?

3.2. being useful is all that's matters

4. Outcome

4.1. = execution

4.2. excution is all facets

4.2.1. everything is thought about

5. Philosophy

5.1. Bauhaus

5.1.1. simple

5.1.2. functional

5.1.3. user-centric

5.2. For the people!

5.2.1. for all people

5.2.1.1. not just the end-users

5.2.2. Jacob Nielsen

5.2.2.1. "99% of everything is bad"

5.3. By the numbers

5.3.1. Google's approach

5.3.2. Data driven design

5.3.2.1. A-B testing

5.3.3. Criticism

5.3.3.1. Not accounting context & other options

6. Process

6.1. Design process

6.1.1. Usually

6.1.1.1. Think -> Concept -> Build

6.1.2. David's

6.1.2.1. Evaluate

6.1.2.2. Experience

6.1.2.3. Experiment

6.1.2.4. Execute

6.1.3. Envision -> Deconstruct -> Construct

6.1.3.1. Imagine end result & then tear it apart

6.1.3.2. Do all 3 all the time

6.2. how do you measure?

6.2.1. how do you understand value?

6.2.1.1. what's the success criteria of each iteration point

6.3. Experience

6.3.1. knowing what you don't know is wisdom

6.3.1.1. know when to ask/who to ask/what to learn

6.3.1.2. know when to look for help

7. Work environment

7.1. where do you work?

7.1.1. in a cubicle?

7.1.1.1. example: Bloomberg

7.1.1.1.1. cubeless

7.1.1.1.2. 100% transparency

8. Bouncing people.. leads to bouncing ideas

8.1. Research found correlation between most innovative cities & those in which you drive less

8.2. Example: people moving positions inside companies

8.3. Example: coworkspaces

9. Designer's temple

9.1. Ideo work space

9.1.1. looks like a large garage

9.2. characteristics

9.2.1. Bumping

9.2.2. Interrupting

9.2.3. Playful

9.2.4. Inspiring

9.2.5. No ownership

9.2.5.1. IP co-owned by team

9.2.6. Fluid leadership

9.2.7. Criticism

9.3. The designer soul is the sketch

9.3.1. The more he sketch the faster he finishes

9.3.2. Book: Bil Buxton: Sketching user experience

9.3.3. Sketch isn't a prototype

10. Criticism

10.1. In a group setting

10.2. All involved

10.3. Positive tones

10.4. Always the truth

11. What design isn't?

12. What is UX?

12.1. Honeycomb diagram by Morville

12.2. David: Happy people spend more money

13. Apple

13.1. They have fans

13.1.1. Do you want fans?

13.2. Why apple?

13.2.1. Shows stock graph

13.3. Deep commitment to design

13.3.1. "everywhere" in the company

13.4. iPod happened because

13.4.1. CEO vision

13.4.2. Holistic design & engineering

13.4.3. Legal & marketing tied to design

13.4.4. Product as a channel

13.4.4.1. product goal is to sell something else

13.5. From iPod to iPhone

13.5.1. they knew much before they're going there

13.5.2. full eco-system around it

14. Anyone can be a UX designer

14.1. if you have the

14.1.1. passion

14.1.2. will

14.1.3. effort

14.1.4. time

14.2. but not everyone is

15. Observe

15.1. & relate what you've seen

15.2. notice everything & deconstruct it

15.3. Do it together

15.3.1. To

15.3.1.1. relate

15.3.1.2. align

15.3.1.3. empower

15.3.1.4. engage

15.3.1.5. share the experience

15.4. Participate

15.4.1. To

15.4.1.1. learn

15.4.1.2. feel

15.5. Measure

15.6. Model

15.6.1. abstract what you see

15.6.2. reference

15.6.3. analysis

15.7. Testing/validation

15.7.1. prioritize

15.7.2. recruite

15.7.3. facilitate

15.7.4. listen

15.7.5. recor

15.7.6. analyze

15.7.7. Fix!

15.8. Recommended book:

15.8.1. Designing for the digital age

15.8.1.1. Kim Goodwin

15.8.1.2. process in your pocket

16. Experience prototypes

16.1. Nothing like the real thing, but if you can't

16.2. Example

16.2.1. Comics

16.2.1.1. Google explanation on why it developed a new browser

16.2.2. Video

16.2.2.1. example

16.2.2.1.1. cooper.com/journal

16.3. Build it

16.3.1. to put it infront of people

16.3.2. allows you to do changes/tweeks

17. How do you know you need help

17.1. Enterprise

17.1.1. you don't know the people that will use your product

17.2. Broad appeal

17.2.1. when designing something not for yourself

18. Can I just hire a visual designer?

18.1. Yes, if you're an idiot

18.2. Great designs does great things

18.3. Example of companies emphasizing UX from day 1

18.3.1. Apple

18.3.2. Flickr

18.3.3. Boxee

18.3.4. Mint

18.3.5. Zappos

18.3.5.1. Happy people lead to happy feet

18.3.5.2. Example their iPhone app

19. What about Google & Craigslist

19.1. Luck & simplicity

19.2. Google's complexity is in the algorithm not the UI

19.3. In craig's list the content IS the interface

20. The lean startup

20.1. It's about culture

20.2. Adaptive UX

21. Can we do it?

21.1. Yes we can

21.2. To start

21.2.1. Read Bill Buxton's book

22. More books

22.1. Must for anyone creating sometihing

22.1.1. The desugb if everthing

22.2. B J Fogg

22.2.1. Persuassion theory