Arts & Culture

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Arts & Culture by Mind Map: Arts & Culture

1. Dancer

1.1. What are working conditions like for this job? (i.e. hours, benefits, high risk?)

1.1.1. Spend many hours a day rehearsing, training, and practising, particularly when preparing for a production

1.1.2. When a production opens they work about 30 hours a week.

1.1.3. Sometimes, dancers will be required to travel, if their company goes on tour.

1.2. What do people in this career do?

1.2.1. Dancers usually get work through auditioning. If the audition is successful, it’s likely more doors will be opened for them.

1.2.2. They have to train hard and learn the steps to keep up with other members. They are sort of self-explanatory, they are dancers so they dance.

1.2.3. Experienced dancers may also become choreographers or instructors. Choreographing is a behind the scenes career, they create the dancing/movement for shows or collections. Instructing is the teaching of dance, working at a studio to train aspiring athletes and artists.

1.3. What salaries do people in this career earn?

1.3.1. The typical earnings of corps ballet dancers with the National Ballet of Canada are at least $875 a week for the duration of their contract. Those who progress to soloist or principal dancer earn the highest salaries, upwards of $1,100 a week.

1.4. How do their job responsibilities change as they move up in position/seniority? (look at sample career path)

1.4.1. “apprentice dancer”: understudy the leads/higher positioned dancers.

1.4.2. progress to “dancer”: responsibilities change to auditioning, rehearsing, learning new moves from a choreographer

1.4.3. “principal dancer”: responsibilities change to auditioning, rehearsing, learning moves from a choreographer, performing lead roles; soloing, doing some choreography work

1.4.4. “choreographer” (if they choose): responsibilities change to creating sequences of movements or dances for dancers and setting it to music, and keeping in shape

1.5. Example of post-secondary program to pursue this path.

1.5.1. Most dancers don’t attend university, instead they attend ballet schools from the time they are about 12, up until they begin working in a professional company. However there are undergrads, and masters in dance that you can do at universities. These are best if you want a career in teaching.

1.5.1.1. 2-3 postsecondary institutions that offer this/these program/programs

1.5.1.1.1. York University-Dance-Master’s degree

1.5.1.1.2. George Brown College-Dance-Certificate

1.5.1.1.3. Ryerson University-Theatre Performance: Dance-Undergraduate degree

1.6. What related experience could be required to follow this path? (i.e. volunteer, co-op)

1.6.1. Dancers need to have trained in some form of dance as well as experience in performing. The amount of required training depends on the type of dance you want to do. For example, most ballet dancers begin their training at around five to eight years old and enter ballet school in their early teens.

1.7. Look at the trends for this career in the job market today. How will the trends affect the world of work for your career? What is the future outlook for this career?

1.7.1. The future outlook for this career is, unfortunately, undetermined. However, after consulting my dance teacher, she informed me that studios are always looking for teachers, but performing is hard.

1.8. What potential barriers could you face in choosing this career?

1.8.1. Some potential barriers are that auditions are scarce and hard to get, and I haven’t been doing ballet as long as some other people.

2. Kinesiologist

2.1. What are working conditions like for this job? (i.e. hours, benefits, high risk?)

2.1.1. Clinical kinesiologists typically work indoors, ergonomic kinesiologists work more on the road, doing vocational work and visiting work sites to examine.

2.2. What do people in this career do?

2.2.1. They use their knowledge of human movement to treat injured or ill patients. They study and assess how movement affects our body, to properly diagnose an injury or illness.

2.2.2. There are 2 main areas of kinesiology: clinical and ergonomic

2.2.2.1. Clinical- start by testing muscular strength of clients, and flexibility, as well as posture.

2.2.2.2. Ergonomic- concerned with working environments, specialize in work site analysis or workplace health and safety. Recommend changes that will help injured workers return to work more quickly and efficiently.

2.3. What salaries do people in this career earn?

2.3.1. Full-time, salaried kinesiologists generally earn somewhere between $30 000 and $70 000 a year. Self employed kinesiologists earn as much as $100 000 a year.

2.4. How do their job responsibilities change as they move up in position/seniority? (look at sample career path)

2.4.1. They begin as “entry-level kinesiologists,” meaning their responsibilities are seeing clients, performing assessments at home or in the workplace, recommending exercise programs, preparing reports.

2.4.2. move to “experienced kinesiologist,” and possibly developing a client base in preparation for own business. Is added to their responsibilities (on top of entry-level responsibilities)

2.4.3. progress to “business owner,” and their responsibilities shift to doing work site, patient and ergonomic assessments; drafting home exercise programs, doing assessment work for companies, evaluating insurance company’s clients, performing some administrative and managerial duties, keeping track of finances.

2.5. Example of post-secondary program to pursue this path.

2.5.1. One post secondary program that I could take is to study kinesiology / exercise science

2.5.1.1. 2-3 postsecondary institutions that offer this/these program/programs

2.5.1.1.1. Brock University-Kinesiology- Undergraduate degree

2.5.1.1.2. Queen’s University-Kinesiology/Health Studies-Master’s degree

2.5.1.1.3. University of Guelph-Human Kinetics-Undergraduate degree

2.6. What related experience could be required to follow this path? (i.e. volunteer, co-op)

2.6.1. It is a good idea to have CPR training as well as first aid certification. Also, volunteer work at a clinic or hospital will give you a feel for the kinesiologist’s working environment.

2.7. Look at the trends for this career in the job market today. How will the trends affect the world of work for your career? What is the future outlook for this career?

2.7.1. Employment growth is expected to be moderate.

2.7.2. A small number of people are expected to retire.

2.7.3. This occupation has recently experienced low levels of unemployment.

2.8. What potential barriers could you face in choosing this career?

2.8.1. A university degree is required, and universities can be hard to get into. Also the employment growth is only expected to be moderate, so getting a job in this area will be difficult.

3. Connections between the 2 careers

3.1. The future outlook for both of these jobs is technically undefined, it is unclear what the opportunity for jobs will be in the future.

3.2. There is little volunteer experience needed in both fields.

3.3. They are both not extremely high risk careers.

3.4. Both require a knowledge of the human body and how muscles work