17 de desarrollo sustenable objetivos

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17 de desarrollo sustenable objetivos by Mind Map: 17 de desarrollo sustenable  objetivos

1. Zero hunger

1.1. Extreme hunger and malnutrition remains a barrier to sustainable development and creates a trap from which people cannot easily escape. Hunger and malnutrition mean less productive individuals, who are more prone to disease and thus often unable to earn more and improve their livelihoods. There are nearly 800 million people who suffer from hunger worldwide, the vast majority in developing countries.

2. Good health

2.1. Ensuring healthy lives and promoting wellbeing for all at all ages is important to building prosperous societies. However, despite great strides in improving people’s health and wellbeing in recent years, inequalities in health care access still persist. More than six million children still die before their fifth birthday each year, and only half of all women in developing regions have access to the health care they need. Epidemics like HIV/ AIDS thrive where fear and discrimination limit people’s ability to receive the services they need to live healthy and productive lives.

3. Quality education

3.1. Education is the key that will allow many other Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to be achieved. When people are able to get quality education they can break from the cycle of poverty. Education therefore helps to reduce inequalities and to reach gender equality. It also empowers people everywhere to live more healthy and sustainable lives. Education is also crucial to fostering tolerance between people and contributes to more peaceful societies.

4. Gender equality

4.1. Women and girls represent half of the world’s population and therefore also half of its potential. But, today gender inequality persists everywhere and stagnates social progress. As of 2014, 143 countries have guaranteed equality between men and women in their Constitutions but 52 have yet to take this step.

5. No poverty

5.1. More than 700 million people still live in extreme poverty and are struggling to fulfil the most basic needs like health, education, and access to water and sanitation, to name a few. That’s a lot of people. Yes. The overwhelming majority of people living on less than $1.90 a day live in Southern Asia and sub-Saharan Africa and they account for about 70 per cent of the global total of extremely poor people. Lower middle-income countries, including China, India, Indonesia and Nigeria, are home to about half of the global poor. However, this issue also affects developed countries. Right now there are 30 million children growing up poor in the world’s richest countries.

6. Clean water

6.1. Access to water, sanitation and hygiene is a human right, yet billions are still faced with daily challenges accessing even the most basic of services. Around 1.8 billion people globally use a source of drinking water that is fecally contaminated. Some 2.4 billion people lack access to basic sanitation services, such as toilets or latrines. Water scarcity affects more than 40 per cent of the global population and is projected to rise. More than 80 per cent of wastewater resulting from human activities is discharged into rivers or sea without any treatment, leading to pollution.

7. Clean energy

7.1. Our everyday lives depend on reliable and affordable energy services to function smoothly and to develop equitably. A well-established energy system supports all sectors: from businesses, medicine and education to agriculture, infrastructure, communications and high-technology. Conversely, lack of access to energy supplies and transformation systems is a constraint to human and economic development.

8. Decent work

8.1. Poverty eradication is only possible through stable and well-paid jobs. Nearly 2.2 billion people live below the US$2 poverty line.

9. Industry and innovation

9.1. Economic growth, social development and climate action are heavily dependent on investments in infrastructure, sustainable industrial development and technological progress. In the face of a rapidly changing global economic landscape and increasing inequalities, sustained growth must include industrialization that first of all, makes opportunities accessible to all people, and two, is supported by innovation and resilient infrastructure.

10. Reduced inequalites

10.1. Inequalities based on income, sex, age, disability, sexual orientation, race, class, ethnicity, religion and opportunity continue to persist across the world, within and among countries. Inequality threatens longterm social and economic development, harms poverty reduction and destroys people’s sense of fulfilment and self-worth. This, in turn, can breed crime, disease and environmental degradation. Most importantly, we cannot achieve sustainable development and make the planet better for all if people are excluded from opportunities, services, and the chance for a better life.

11. Sustainable communites

11.1. Half of humanity—3.5 billion people—live in cities today, and this number will continue to grow. Because the future will be urban for a majority of people, the solutions to some of the greatest issues facing humans— poverty, climate change, healthcare, education— must be found in city life.

12. Responsible consupmtion and production

12.1. More people globally are expected to join the middle class over the next two decades. This is good for individual prosperity but it will increase demand for already constrained natural resources. If we don’t act to change our consumption and production patterns, we will cause irreversible damage to our environment.

13. Climate action

13.1. Climate change is caused by human activities and is threatening the way we live and the future of our planet. By addressing climate change, we can build a sustainable world for everyone. But we need to act now.

14. Life under water

14.1. Oceans provide key natural resources including food, medicines, biofuels and other products. They help with the breakdown and removal of waste and pollution, and their coastal ecosystems act as buffers to reduce damage from storms. Maintaining healthy oceans supports climate change mitigation and adaptation efforts. And have you been to the seaside? It’s also a great place for tourism and recreation. Even more, Marine Protected Areas contribute to poverty reduction by increasing fish catches and income, and improving health. They also help improve gender equality, as women do much of the work at small-scale fisheries. The marine environment is also home to a stunning variety of beautiful creatures, ranging from single-celled organisms to the biggest animal ever to have lived on the Earth–the blue whale. They are also home to coral reefs, one of the most diverse ecosystems on the planet.

15. Life on lad

15.1. Forests cover nearly 31 per cent of our planet’s land area. From the air we breathe, to the water we drink, to the food we eat–forests sustain us. Think about it. Around 1.6 billion people depend on forests for their livelihood. Almost 75 per cent of the world’s poor are affected directly by land degradation. Did you know that forests are home to more than 80 per cent of all terrestrial species of animals, plants and insects? And of the 8,300 animal breeds known, 8 per cent are extinct and 22 per cent are at risk of extinction. Biodiversity and the ecosystem services it underpins can also be the basis for climate change. Adaptation and disaster risk reduction strategies as they can deliver benefits that will increase the resilience of people to the impacts of climate change. Forests and nature are also important for recreation and mental well-being. In many cultures, natural landscapes are closely linked to spiritual values, religious beliefs and traditional teachings.

16. Peace and justice

16.1. Peaceful, just and inclusive societies are necessary to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). People everywhere need to be free of fear from all forms of violence and feel safe as they go about their lives whatever their ethnicity, faith or sexual orientation. In order to advance the SDGs we need effective and inclusive public institutions that can deliver quality education and healthcare, fair economic policies and inclusive environmental protection.

17. Partnerships for the goals

17.1. In 2015, world leaders adopted the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development that aims to end poverty, tackle inequalities and combat climate change. We need everyone to come together—governments, civil society, scientists, academia and the private sector— to achieve the sustainable development goals.