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CBR Big Idea: Self Identity and Future Goals by Mind Map: CBR Big Idea: Self Identity and
Future Goals
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CBR Big Idea: Self Identity and Future Goals

Special Populations

Mexican-Americans

14. von Destinon, M. (1990). Descubriendo el sueno: Programming for success. Retrieved from http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/contentdelivery/servlet/ERICServlet?accno=ED318355 The author examine the elements of success for Mexican Americans at the University of Arizona. It was found that if the bureaucracy was explained to them and the education was personalized with the inclusion of Hispanic studies, that Hispanic students were more apt to be successful.

African Americans

18. Gibson, M. A. (2005). Promoting academic engagement among minority youth: Implications from John Ogbu's Shaker Heights ethnography. International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education, 18(5), 581-603. Retrieved from http://taylorandfrancis.metapress.com/link.asp?target=contribution&id=J60274573487LH70 The author compared their study of a bi-racial high school to an earlier study. The author recognized the community factors and their influence on minority student success in school. A key element to success the author puts forth is allowing students an opportunity to maintain a sense of self-identity in light of their surroundings at school.

20. Ogbu, J. U. (2004). Collective Identity and the Burden of “Acting White” in Black History, Community, and Education. Urban Review, 36(1), 1-35. Retrieved from http://www.springerlink.com/content/n508482060h051q0/ “Collective identity refers to people’s sense of who they are, their ‘‘we- feeling’’ or ‘‘belonging.’’ People express their collective identity with emblems or cultural symbols which reflect their attitudes, beliefs, feelings, behaviors, and language or dialect. The persistence of a group’s collective identity depends on the continuity of the external (historical and structural) forces that contributed to its formation. It also depends on the continuity of responses of the group (Castile and Kushner, 1981; DeVos, 1995; Spicer, 1966, 1971).”

4. Price, D. V., & Reeves, E. B. (2003). Student poverty, school accountability, and postsecondary enrollment: A challenge for educational reform in Kentucky. Journal of Poverty, 7(4), 21-35. Retrieved from http://www.units.muohio.edu/journalofpoverty/jopabs/JPOABS23.HTM#2 The greatest information found in this article that poverty and race are not necessarily directly linked together. Minority populations can increase math scores in a school. I am in a school with a high minority and poverty rates in its population.

Asian Americans

7. Krashen, S. (2005). The hard work hypothesis: Is doing your homework enough to overcome the effects of poverty?. Multicultural Education, 12(4), 16-19. Retrieved from http://www.sdkrashen.com/articles/hardwork/index.html Krashen examines the hard work principle and if it is able to overcome poverty levels. After examining two groups of Asian descent, he concludes that students are able to overcome poverty through hard work.

Socio-Economic

Single Mothers

Lipman, E. L., & Boyle, M. H. (2005). Social support and education groups for single mothers: A randomized controlled trial of a community-based program. CMAJ: Canadian Medical Association Journal, 173(12), 1451-1456. doi:10.1503/cmaj.050655

10. Hollander, D. D. (2001). Young mothers' disadvantage not their age itself, accounts for their children's educational problems. Family Planning Perspectives, 33(6), 282. Retrieved from http://www.guttmacher.org/pubs/journals/3328201.html The author examined two different high risk age groups for pregnancy- teens and mothers over 35. Hollander concludes that children of teenage mothers have more difficulties in school due to socioeconomic conditions.

Poverty

1. Mack-Kirschner, A. (2007, February). Closing the achievement gap: The odds are against it. California English, 12. Retrieved from http://www.cateweb.org/california_english/ce_2007_february.htm#GAP Article discusses the realistic possibilities of closing the achievement gap between the students in poverty and students from affluent homes. The author is a teacher in a California inner-city school and sees first hand the struggles that some students face. She raises the point that the United States is the only country that tries to educate all of the citizens.

2. Tilak, J. G. (2002). Education and Poverty. Journal of Human Development, 3(2), 191-207. doi:10.1080/14649880220147301 The author draws a direct connection between the level of education and the poverty level of students. The author believes that if society invests heavily into education, that it will see a return in the economic strength of the nation. The author notes that the poor do not place a high value on education.

. Gelberg, D. (2007). The business agenda for school reform: A parallel universe. Teacher Education Quarterly, 34(2), 45-58. Retrieved from http://www.teqjournal.org/backvols/2007/34_2/34_2.htm The author examines the business approach to education. It examines the effects of newer facilities in high poverty areas, but advocates more mentors being placed in schools to provide role models in the building. It also notes the ineffectiveness of NCLB as students in poverty deal with every day life struggles and focus less on education.

6. Betts, J. R., & Morrell, D. (1999). The determinants of undergraduate grade point average. Journal of Human Resources, 34(2), 268-293. Retrieved from http://www.ssc.wisc.edu/jhr/1999ab/betts.html The article views different variables and their effects on a students’ GPA. It also examined the effects of GPA and a student’s earnings. It showed that a student’s college and high school GPA both had positive effects on a student’s earnings. It also shows that, outside of financial levels, teacher experience level has the greatest indication of a student’s success in college.

Bennett, M. M. (2008). Understanding the students we teach: Poverty in the classroom. Clearing House, 81(6), 251-256. doi:10.3200/TCHS.81.6.251-256 Bennet examines the preparation of teachers for students in poverty levels. The author concludes that most teacher candidates are from middle class backgrounds and have a difficult time working with students from impoverished backgrounds.

19. Wikeley, F., Bullock, K., Muschamp, Y., & Ridge, T. (2009). Educational relationships and their impact on poverty. International Journal of Inclusive Education, 13(4), 377-393. Retrieved from http://www.informaworld.com/openurl?genre=article&id=doi:10.1080/13603110802141045 The authors studied the effects of personal relationships between low-income students and adults on the students’ success in school.

Middle Class

17. Seider, M. (2008). The dynamics of social reproduction: How class works at a state college and elite private college. Equity & Excellence in Education, 41(1), 45-61. doi:10.1080/10665680701774154 Author interviewed three sets of white students. One set of 15 was less affluent students at a State College, 15 less affluent students at a Little Ivy College and 15 affluent students at the same affluent college. The students did not believe they acknowledged class but their work ethic. However, affluent students aspired to positions of power in law and medicine and less affluent students aspired to careers such as teaching.

Affluent

17. Seider, M. (2008). The dynamics of social reproduction: How class works at a state college and elite private college. Equity & Excellence in Education, 41(1), 45-61. doi:10.1080/10665680701774154 Author interviewed three sets of white students. One set of 15 was less affluent students at a State College, 15 less affluent students at a Little Ivy College and 15 affluent students at the same affluent college. The students did not believe they acknowledged class but their work ethic. However, affluent students aspired to positions of power in law and medicine and less affluent students aspired to careers such as teaching.

Developmental Students

9. Skiba, R. J., Poloni-Staudinger, L., Simmons, A. B., Feggins-Azziz, L., & Choong-Geun, C. (2005). Unproven links: Can poverty explain ethnic disproportionality in special education?. Journal of Special Education, 39(3), 130-144. Retrieved from http://sed.sagepub.com/content/39/3.toc The authors examine the links between poverty and the disproportionate rate of African Americans in special education. They found that there is a direct link to the poverty rate and the numbers of African Americans in special education courses.

16. Di Tommaso, K. (2010). The connection between role model relationships and self-direction in developmental students. Research & Teaching in Developmental Education, 27(1), 4-19. Retrieved from http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1P3-2249175451.html The study examines the different socio-variables have on developmental students. The descriptors not only apply to developmental students, but all students.

21. Parker, D. R., White, C. E., Collins, L., Banerjee, M., & McGuire, J. M. (2009). Learning technologies management system (LiTMS): a multidimensional service delivery model for college students with learning disabilities and ADHD. Journal of Postsecondary Education and Disability, 22(2), 130-136. Retrieved from http://www.ahead.org/publications/jped The researchers provide a framework where students with learning disabilities can become successful in a college setting using different technologies.

22. Orr, A. C., & Goodman, N. (2010). "People like Me Don't Go to College:" The Legacy of Learning Disability. Journal of Ethnographic & Qualitative Research, 4(4), 213-225. Retrieved from http://www.cedarville.edu/event/eqrc/journal/journal.htm Orr and Goodman interviewed fourteen undergraduate students with learning disabilities to understand how college faculty members can change their instructional methods to retain more students.

15. The study examines the positive effects of social partnerships on learning. The author found that if the learning was related to the community that they are member, then it the learner becomes more engaged and success increases for the student.