Crohn's Disease

Get Started. It's Free
or sign up with your email address
Rocket clouds
Crohn's Disease by Mind Map: Crohn's Disease

1. Pathogenesis

1.1. Genetic abnormalities

1.1.1. Causes defects in mucosal barrier function

1.1.2. Immunoregulation

1.1.3. Bacterial clearance

1.1.4. Overly aggressive T cell responses

1.2. Environmental factors

1.2.1. Break the mucosal barrier

1.2.2. Stimulate immune responses

1.2.3. Alter the balance between beneficial and pathogenic enteric bacteria

2. Risk factors

2.1. Age

2.1.1. More likely to develop when young

2.2. Ethnicity

2.2.1. Whites

2.2.2. Eastern European

2.3. Family history

2.3.1. Higher risk if close relative has disease

2.3.1.1. Parent

2.3.1.2. Sibling

2.4. Smoking

2.5. NSAID medication use

2.5.1. Ibuprofen

2.5.1.1. Advil

2.5.1.2. Motrin IB

2.5.2. Naproxen sodium

2.5.2.1. Aleve

2.5.3. Diclofenac sodium

2.5.3.1. Voltaren

2.6. Location

2.6.1. Urban area

2.6.2. Industrialized area

3. Signs and symptoms

3.1. Diarrhea

3.2. Fever

3.3. Fatigue

3.4. Abdominal pain

3.5. Blood in stool

3.6. Mouth sores

3.7. Reduced appetite

3.8. Weight loss

3.9. Pain around the anus

3.10. Inflammation

3.10.1. Skin

3.10.2. Eyes

3.10.3. Joints

3.10.4. Liver

3.10.5. Bile ducts

3.11. Delayed growth

4. Treatments

4.1. Anti-inflammatory drugs

4.1.1. Corticosteroids

4.1.1.1. Prednisone

4.1.1.2. Budesonide

4.1.2. Oral 5-amniosalicylates

4.1.2.1. Mesalamine

4.1.2.2. Sulfasalazine

4.2. Immune system suppressors

4.2.1. Azathioprine

4.2.2. Mercaptopurine

4.2.3. Infliximab

4.2.4. Methotrexate

4.2.5. Vedolizumab

4.3. Antibiotics

4.3.1. Ciprofloxacin

4.3.2. Metronidazole

4.4. Other medications

4.4.1. Anti-diarrheals

4.4.2. Pain relievers

4.4.3. Iron supplements

4.4.4. Vitamin B-12 shots

4.4.5. Calcium supplements

4.5. Nutrition therapy

4.5.1. Enteral nutrition

4.5.2. Parenteral nutrition

4.6. Surgery

4.6.1. Colostomy

4.6.2. Ileostomy

4.6.3. Close fistulas

4.7. Clinical trials

4.8. Diet changes

4.8.1. Limit dairy

4.8.2. Low fat foods

4.8.3. Limit fiber

4.8.4. Eat small meals

4.8.5. Drink water

4.8.6. Multivitamins

4.9. Alternative medicine

4.9.1. Herbal supplements

4.9.2. Probiotics

4.9.3. Fish oil

4.9.4. Acupuncture

4.9.5. Prebiotics

5. Diagnostics

5.1. Blood tests

5.1.1. Anemia

5.1.2. Infection

5.1.3. Fecal occult blood test

5.2. Procedures

5.2.1. Colonoscopy

5.2.2. Capsule endoscopy

5.2.3. Balloon assisted enteroscopy

5.3. Scans

5.3.1. Computerized Tomography

5.3.2. Magnetic resonance imaging

6. Incidence/ Prevalence

6.1. 780,000 Americans have Crohn's

6.2. Between 3-14 people out of every 100,000 are diagnosed each year

6.3. More common in adults than children

6.3.1. 241 cases per 100,000 people in people over 20

6.3.2. 58 cases per 100,000 people under 20

6.4. Twice more likely in whites than Hispanics.

6.5. Hospitalizations due to Crohn's has almost doubled since 2004

6.6. Total cost of Crohn's is about $3.6 billion a year

7. Sources

7.1. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/crohns-disease/symptoms-causes/syc-20353304

7.2. https://crohnsdisease.com/basics/statistics/

7.3. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/crohns-disease/diagnosis-treatment/drc-20353309

7.4. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16819502